Likes Likes:  0
Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 47 of 47
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Does anybody here play through an amp modeler, such as the Line 6 Pod?
    Are you satisfied with the sounds (especially the clean, jazzy sound) you get?
    Would you use it even in a gig?
    Thanks in advance!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    The impression I get about amp modelers in general is that the clean live sound through headphones is not at all satisfactory, just lifeless, whereas the recorded sound can be very convincing. This is (was) my experience with a Yamaha DG stomp, so I generally practice on electric unplugged (great for when it grabs you at 3 a.m.), or otherwise pick up the acoustic, which I have have strung with my usual flatwounds for this purpose.I know some people have had success putting modelers straight thru PAs at gigs. The (DG's) distortion and effected sounds are a lot closer for headphone practice, but who cares about them ? John McLaughlin's live electric set up is (or was) sans amp, as I remember.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    I use a GNX3000 by digitech and use it with the MFX Supermodels supplied by a third party. I've recorded comparisons vs. my favorite amps a fender twin and a vintage Princeton Reverb. All my friends ended up prefering the Digitech.

    Regarding a Pod, check out my buddy RLD, he really knows how to get good sounds out of a Pod (rock, blues, pop sounds). Scroll and look for songs that are rock blues or pop (he does a lot different styles).

    Music page of Dem Ohh - MP3 music page on SoundClick

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Big thumbs-up for modelers...

    I switched from tube amps to modelers and solid-state almost two years ago and haven't regretted it for a moment.

    A few important points to note:

    1. The labels on the box are merely suggestions. If you take them literally you're bound to be disappointed.

    2. Every vendor has its own "flavor" (see #1) which includes various strengths and weaknesses.

    3. If you're finicky about how your gear sounds you'll be much better off shopping for a modeler that can produce one or two of you most cherished sounds. Think of the other thirteeen bazillion sounds in the box as a "free bonus"...


    Yes, I have gigged with modelers (specifically a Boss GT-8 and a Digitech RP350). It's an absolute joy being able to walk into a venue with my guitar in one hand and a lightweight bag (modeler, cables, and gig essentials) in the other. No more multiple trips from the car to the venue, no handtrucks, ...

    The sound using a modeler can be pretty much whatever you'd like it to be (within the limitations of the device - see #1 above). However - and this is very important - you need to set up your sounds using the right kind of amplification. If you're expecting to plug into the venue's PA when you play out, you must set up your patches by playing through a full-range amp. You don't have to match the venue's PA gear - just get a decent full-range powered speaker designed for sound-reinforcement work. (If you set up your patches for a guitar amp and then try to use the same patches through a PA, you will be displeased - I guarantee it.)

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C View Post
    The impression I get about amp modelers in general is that the clean live sound through headphones is not at all satisfactory, just lifeless, whereas the recorded sound can be very convincing.
    A lot of this has to do with the loss of ambient sound when you're wearing the headphones. You can compensate to a certain extent using reverb and EQ. I still prefer the hear a real room, though.

    John McLaughlin's live electric set up is (or was) sans amp, as I remember.
    Last I checked JM uses an audio interface and a Mac laptop.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Ha! I meant sans amp as in amp-less rather than a SansAmp
    Yes, I had read somwhere about John's use of a Mac.

    I also found that for headphone practice you have to dial in a lot more reverb than you'd normally use, plus maybe some compression (which I rarely use), so that sort of defeats the object for me.

    As I said, modeler > PA works well for some folks. Practical it is.

  8. #7
    chitlinsonrye Guest
    It's nothing fancy, but I have a Digitech RP150. I find the Fender Twin model, clean, with a touch of plate reverb and some EQ tweaking sounds not too bad in the headphones. It's not a professional piece of equipment, but less than a c-note it works, and there's lotsa stuff to play around with

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Chitlins,

    I wholeheartedly agree with you about the Digitech. I have an RP 200a, which goes on ebay for probably less than $70. I have several different jazz settings on it but my current fave is the Fender Twin amp model with a touch of reverb and a touch of vibrato. I run this into my computer sound card and out through some relatively cheap m-audio studio monitors. This is an ideal set up for home practicing. I also have a Roland Cube 60 and the effects on it are horrible so I use my digitech modeler plugged into the amp if I need an amp, and keep the amp effects off.

    Also, Fidelcaster, check out the Youtube videos of a guy named Jazzerman. He uses an RP300, i think, for his recordings and sounds great, not to mention he is also an incredible player. He has one particular video where he details how he gets his sound.

    The cheap Digitech modelers are a testatment to what one can do with inexpensive equipment.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by bob32069 View Post
    Chitlins,
    Also, Fidelcaster, check out the Youtube videos of a guy named Jazzerman. He uses an RP300, i think, for his recordings and sounds great, not to mention he is also an incredible player. He has one particular video where he details how he gets his sound.
    Jazzerman is awesome! Thank you for the tip, Bob!

  11. #10
    chitlinsonrye Guest
    Oh yeah Bob. I wish they had stuff like this when I started. I had an Electric Mistress that I'm sure gave off gamma rays it was so noisy...

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Honestly, amp modelers like the Line 6 POD are pieces of junk. They don't even sound like the amps they claim they sound like.

    All you need is a good 25-watt amp. I run a stereo setup of two amplifiers: a Jay Turser Classic 25 RC and a Fender Sidekick Reverb 35. Both are small amps that will BLOW you out of the room!

    In my experience with the POD, I thought the tones were pretty fake sounding. Nothing natural about the tones. I'm not too impressed with amp modelers and Line 6 in general. Line 6 did, however, make a good pedal: the DL4 Delay Modeler. The only reason I like that pedal was for it's looping function. That pedal sounded great.

    I wouldn't waste your money on a POD or anything that models amplifiers. It's not worth your money or time.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Generation gap?

    You need zero gizmos to shed guitar. Period. Maybe a metronome.

    Play the guitar, that's all. If you need some amplification to enhance the bass, turn on an amp. Any one ever made will do.

    The sound comes from you, not some gizmo.

    Hours of fun.

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    I think maybe you're missing the point, Donelson. 90% of the time I play an unplugged acoustic guitar; just for fun, I've bought an electric, but living in an apartment with other people most of the time I can't plug it in my 30W solid-state amplifier.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    Honestly, amp modelers like the Line 6 POD are pieces of junk. They don't even sound like the amps they claim they sound like.

    All you need is a good 25-watt amp. I run a stereo setup of two amplifiers: a Jay Turser Classic 25 RC and a Fender Sidekick Reverb 35. Both are small amps that will BLOW you out of the room!

    In my experience with the POD, I thought the tones were pretty fake sounding. Nothing natural about the tones. I'm not too impressed with amp modelers and Line 6 in general. Line 6 did, however, make a good pedal: the DL4 Delay Modeler. The only reason I like that pedal was for it's looping function. That pedal sounded great.

    I wouldn't waste your money on a POD or anything that models amplifiers. It's not worth your money or time.
    Wow, what a narrow, ill informed opinion. Line 6 modelers have been used on tour from groups like Megadeath and Weazer. I have had one for years that I play thru an Atomic tube amp. I have gone direct with it numerous times. It is not the only amp I have, but for what it does, it does it well.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    ... for what it does, it does it well.
    True of all modelers, regardless of brand or cost.

    There are differences in the sound of any given amp model from brand to brand. That's why I recommend checking out a modeling rig in person rather than by reading literature, reviews or recommendation. Most people wouldn't buy a "real" amp without hearing it first; they should give the same care to selection of a modeler.

    Many of the other so-called shortcomings of modelers can be attributed to psychoacoustic differences. If you were able to turn a "real" amp down to whisper levels, it'd sound a lot like a modeler sounds at those listening volumes. Conversely if you crank a modeler up to "flap your pants" volumes, it's going to sound a lot like the "real" amp does at those volumes.

    Finally, if you have *any* expectation of a modeler sounding even remotely like the label on the selector dial suggests, you *must* run it through a full-range speaker. Modelers only reach their full potential through a powered full-range speaker or a good PA.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    I completely agree with TieDyedDevil.

    After being a tube amp player for decades I've totally switched camps. I did blind sound comparisons of my amp modelers vs. my favorite amp a vintage Fender Princeton Reverb (and that amp has new new properly biased tubes, caps etc.) I set the modelers (a GT-3 and a Digitech GNX300) to sound like a Fender amp. When I did the blind sound comparisons with my musician friends, the modelers were the favored sounds... actually they thought the modelers were tube amps.

    I believe those that don't like the amp modelers are being closed minded and/or just don't know how to use them... and they are much more complicated to use than a guitar amp (and accordingly you can get a much larger variety of sounds). Also, you need to create your own sounds, the factory presets may not be anything near the sound you're looking for.

    Take a great sounding Dumble amp, mic it with a good mic, and route that signal to a Marshall stack dialed in the way you would normally dial in a Marshall stack. Sounds stupid, right? Yeah that is stupid and sounds like crap. Guitar amps aren't designed for that kind of signal. But that's the type of signal you get out of an optimally dialed in amp modeler, and you don't want to send that signal into a guitar amp, that's just stupid... and sounds bad.

    Like TieDyedDevil said, send the amp modeler through a good servo or PA amp and full range speaker then make your comparison.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    Wow, what a narrow, ill informed opinion. Line 6 modelers have been used on tour from groups like Megadeath and Weazer. I have had one for years that I play thru an Atomic tube amp. I have gone direct with it numerous times. It is not the only amp I have, but for what it does, it does it well.

    So you're saying someone who has owned the Line 6 POD like I have, that my experience with it is ill informed? Are you kidding me?

    I don't give a damn if the Pope used it, the Line 6 POD is a piece of junk. I found myself bypass it most of the time just to get a good signal. It sucks the hell out of your tone.

    It might be alirght for you, but I found the unit to be totally useless and it offered nothing in the way of tone. It sounded like crap.

    All you need is a good little 25-watt amp, reverb unit like a Lexicon, and a good guitar. BOOM, instant tone.

    Enjoy your piece of crap.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    I completely agree with TieDyedDevil.

    After being a tube amp player for decades I've totally switched camps. I did blind sound comparisons of my amp modelers vs. my favorite amp a vintage Fender Princeton Reverb (and that amp has new new properly biased tubes, caps etc.) I set the modelers (a GT-3 and a Digitech GNX300) to sound like a Fender amp. When I did the blind sound comparisons with my musician friends, the modelers were the favored sounds... actually they thought the modelers were tube amps.

    I believe those that don't like the amp modelers are being closed minded and/or just don't know how to use them... and they are much more complicated to use than a guitar amp (and accordingly you can get a much larger variety of sounds). Also, you need to create your own sounds, the factory presets may not be anything near the sound you're looking for.

    Take a great sounding Dumble amp, mic it with a good mic, and route that signal to a Marshall stack dialed in the way you would normally dial in a Marshall stack. Sounds stupid, right? Yeah that is stupid and sounds like crap. Guitar amps aren't designed for that kind of signal. But that's the type of signal you get out of an optimally dialed in amp modeler, and you don't want to send that signal into a guitar amp, that's just stupid... and sounds bad.

    Like TieDyedDevil said, send the amp modeler through a good servo or PA amp and full range speaker then make your comparison.

    Let me tell you how to get your own tone, Einstein, pick out some pedals you like, get an amplifier you like, and a guitar you like, then start messing with them until you reach the sound you like.

    Those Line 6 POD's a pieces of junk and sound like crap whether you're playing them through your computer or listening to it through a pair of headphones. The result is always the same: crap. I'll stick to my good old trusty pedals and rackmount gear.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Last edited by fep; 10-04-2008 at 01:27 AM.

  21. #20
    chitlinsonrye Guest
    Freedom of choice is a great thing...

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    So you're saying someone who has owned the Line 6 POD like I have, that my experience with it is ill informed? Are you kidding me?

    I don't give a damn if the Pope used it, the Line 6 POD is a piece of junk. I found myself bypass it most of the time just to get a good signal. It sucks the hell out of your tone.

    It might be alirght for you, but I found the unit to be totally useless and it offered nothing in the way of tone. It sounded like crap.

    All you need is a good little 25-watt amp, reverb unit like a Lexicon, and a good guitar. BOOM, instant tone.

    Enjoy your piece of crap.
    Of course you are entitled to your opinion, didn't mean to suggest you weren't. However, it sounds like perhaps you used in ways that it wasn't intended, like an effects pedal in front of an amp. It IS at it's best using it direct, whether thru a PA or into a computer.

    There are plenty of pros who use them regularly, so you are right and they are are wrong, or perhaps it didn't fit what you were looking for, or were using it in ways it is not that great. It certainly is not like a tube amp, that is for sure.

    Sounds like you are a tube amp + pedals player. That is my primary set up for rock/pop stuff too.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    Of course you are entitled to your opinion, didn't mean to suggest you weren't. However, it sounds like perhaps you used in ways that it wasn't intended, like an effects pedal in front of an amp. It IS at it's best using it direct, whether thru a PA or into a computer.

    There are plenty of pros who use them regularly, so you are right and they are are wrong, or perhaps it didn't fit what you were looking for, or were using it in ways it is not that great. It certainly is not like a tube amp, that is for sure.

    Sounds like you are a tube amp + pedals player. That is my primary set up for rock/pop stuff too.

    I have actually used the Line 6 POD in several different ways. Through the computer, as a practice tool, through another amplifier, etc. I still didn't like it, but that's my opinion. The tones are just unnatural to me.

    I actually like some pedals. I like rackmount reverb units like the Lexicon MPX-110, which I own. I really don't play rock, so I don't have any need for anything but reverb, delay, and a compression pedal.

    Having said that, there are plenty of jazz guitarists who use pedals. Look at all the gear Pat Metheny or John Scofield uses. It's really ridiculous, but they manage to incorporate those sounds into jazz music.

    You don't have to be a rock player to use a lot of pedals, especially nowadays.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    I have actually used the Line 6 POD in several different ways. Through the computer, as a practice tool, through another amplifier, etc. I still didn't like it, but that's my opinion. The tones are just unnatural to me.

    I actually like some pedals. I like rackmount reverb units like the Lexicon MPX-110, which I own. I really don't play rock, so I don't have any need for anything but reverb, delay, and a compression pedal.

    Having said that, there are plenty of jazz guitarists who use pedals. Look at all the gear Pat Metheny or John Scofield uses. It's really ridiculous, but they manage to incorporate those sounds into jazz music.

    You don't have to be a rock player to use a lot of pedals, especially nowadays.
    Agreed. I saw Sco in August, and he had the junkiest pedal board I have seen for a pro. Lots of boss pedals, though he didn't use them. He did use his Boomrang looper which is pretty noisy. Got his dirt from the AC30 he was playing thru. Sounded pretty sweet.

    I have seen Metheny a couple of times live, and never seen him with any pedals. Maybe his set up has changed thru the years. He does do that rack delay to two amps thing still.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    Agreed. I saw Sco in August, and he had the junkiest pedal board I have seen for a pro. Lots of boss pedals, though he didn't use them. He did use his Boomrang looper which is pretty noisy. Got his dirt from the AC30 he was playing thru. Sounded pretty sweet.

    I have seen Metheny a couple of times live, and never seen him with any pedals. Maybe his set up has changed thru the years. He does do that rack delay to two amps thing still.


    I'm not a big Sco fan, so I'm not very familiar with what kind of pedals and stuff he uses, but I knew he had a big pedalboard, because I read an interview he did with Guitar Player several years ago.

    Metheny's setup is pretty complex. I'm not sure if it is now, but he once upon a time used several Roland Guitar Synthesizer units. I was aware he still used those Lexicon Prime Delays. That's an important part of his sound.

    Frisell is my favorite my biggest idol, but what is so remarkable about him, besides, his amazing guitar technique, is his use of effects. He, like Metheny and Scofield, has an instantly recognizable tone. This is something that a lot of guitarists need to work. Getting a good tone, for me anyway, is more important than anything you play. If I don't have a good tone or if I don't have my tone, then I can't play well.

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Hello,
    I have the Line 6 Pocket POD and i'm happy with it for home prectice.
    *Hofner President 1959 *Epiphone Broadway
    *Crafter TB-Rose *Gitane DG 320 Gibson L5 1951
    - Fender Champion 600
    - Laney Linebreaker 100 Reverb

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    Metheny's setup is pretty complex. I'm not sure if it is now, but he once upon a time used several Roland Guitar Synthesizer units. I was aware he still used those Lexicon Prime Delays. That's an important part of his sound.
    Yes, and he is not too keen in talking about it. He played his old guitar synth when I saw him last summer. He likes it for getting a more aggressive tone he said. He is from where I live, and his brother Mike (horn player) is a regular at all the jazz clubs. I have gotten to talk to Pat on a few occassions, and is always a pleasant and interesting guy.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by frisellfan19 View Post
    getting a good tone, for me anyway, is more important than anything you play. If I don't have a good tone or if I don't have my tone, then I can't play well.
    That's an interesting observation. I have taken that position myself in the not-too-distant past.

    Over the years I've moved to cleaner, less-effected "tones". I've found that as I pay more attention to nuances of *how* I play, I want to hear more of the guitar iteself. Conversely, as I hear more of the *guitar*, I pay more attention to the nuances of my playing.

    This is just one point in my own personal development. I can't predict how I'll feel about this subject in a year or two. Looking back, though, I was *firmly* in the "no amp is good enough if it doesn't have tubes" camp up until two years ago. A move toward saner (i.e. earplugs not required) playing volumes and a desire to have less mass to lug (tube amps - even small ones - are on the heavy side) led me to switch - first to modelers, then to solid-state amps.

    I'm at the point now where I don't want to hear *any* nonlinearity in my signal. My Fender Jazz King, which has a certain "warmth" to its sound, gets that warmth through very low levels of distortion. I prefer now to play direct to board (which is really convenient because all I need to carry is my guitar and a DI) or through a clean-clean amp designed for acoustic instruments (currently an 18-pound AER Compact 60).

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    I just picked up a Used but great condition GT8 and am getting used to it. I have a PodXT Live and had no issues getting good and sometimes great tones from it. The GT8 frequently sounds overdriven or muddy despite maniacal tweaking. I run everything through an Alesis USB16 then to the 212 amp in stereo. I really think what I need would be some decent patches to get started on making my own from them, or any suggestions on system or patch settings.

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    I just sold my GT-8 a couple weeks ago. It's a great unit, but overkill (both in terms of size and capabilities) for my requirements.

    There are a couple of good resources on the net that can offer help with your GT-8 programming.

    Welcome to Boss GT Central
    TheStompBox.Net - Powered by vBulletin

    First, though, I'd suggest taking a few hours to wade through the manual. Even though you won't understand everything the first time through, recognizing that you've seen a term or concept before and having an idea of where to find it in the manual will prove invaluable in the long run.

    Adopting other people's patches is at best a gamble since you're dealing with unknown quantities in terms of the programmer's other gear and sonic preferences. It's better, IMO, to learn how to program your own patches.

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    I have the orginal, the GT-3 and I really like it, and the GT-8 no doubt is much better.

    The problem is there are so many places to adjust the volume and eq in the signal chain. You've got global volume and eq, master volume, amp sim volume and eqs, distortion pedal volume and eq other effects volumes and eqs etc. You don't want all these to conflict with each other.

    What I do is turn off all effects, zero out all eqs, and set the volumes all equal at about 3/4 of max (if I recall that's 75).

    Then I pick an amp sim, like the fender twin, and set the gain, master volume, treble middle and bass to taste. I then add effects one at a time to a patch, building to the sound you're after.

    I use the master volume to 'volume' match my various patches. I think of the global eq as a way to adjust all patches (globally) to different rooms and/or PAs.
    Last edited by fep; 10-23-2008 at 09:54 PM.

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    I bought a Johnson J-stations when the original POD's were popular. I love it, I don't use the effects but It has done me well for recording. I'm not sure how it comparison to a real tube amp but for what I do. I get decent tone direct to my computer or 4-track.

    I've not herd good things about the line 6 combo amps, and recently purchase the Vox Valvetronix amp. I've been very happy with it for recording and also get a good sound through the speaker as a combo but not quite as good as direct.

    I love tube amps but i'm on a solid state budget so i have to make do.

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    I will say again that I'm not a fan of amp modelers nor am I fan of amps that have built-in effects like those Line 6 Spiders, Roland Cubes or Fender G-DEC. I just think that you can get better sounds out of actual pedals. I don't have time in a live performance to adjust something on my amp while I'm playing. That's why pedals are still popular and are still being used to this day.

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    I can see that, frisellfan. The UI on modelers, even the high-end ones, is not great. I'd much rather have a line of knobs to adjust, I think...

    Then again, I *have* had rigs with lots of knobs (for example a Boogie Mark IV and a pedalboard) and didn't find all those knobs to be of much help on a dark stage.

    My current aesthetic in rig design emphasizes simplicity. Even when I use a modeler I use *one* patch and don't bother to tweak anything (nor do I need to.) I started down this path about five years ago when I was having a guitar built for me. I had originally designed a very complex pickup switching system (something like 15 different combinations from a pair of humbuckers). Before the builder started wiring I realized that "It's music, not rocket science" and dropped back to a standard wiring scheme.

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    My setup is pure simplicity: Fender Stratocaster, Morley volume pedal, Boss ME-50, Lexicon MPX-110, Line 6 DL4, and a Jay Turser Classic 25RC. It doesn't get much simpler than that.

    I used to have a pretty complex rig: had about 7 pedals and four rackmount units. It was ridiculous. My tone is much more purer these days and has been for the last 9 years or so.
    Last edited by frisellfan19; 11-10-2008 at 03:46 AM.

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    I am asking for help!
    Are there any modeling amplifiers that may be deemed suitable for guitar recording ... that is, for making recordings on my notebook (preferably) using he USB input?
    I am somewhat reluctant to go directly to the mic input with my guitar since there is (I believe) a voltage (+5V) on the ring (sleeve), acting as a phantom supply for those (typically condenser) multimedia microphones.

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    There are a number of modelers that have a USB audio connection. Zoom, Digitech, Line6, ... Google for specifics.

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    i have a boss me 50 and digitech gnx 3. still trying to understand how to use the gnx3.

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    Thanks, everybody!
    I borrowed the Fast Track USB audio interface and the Line 6 POD Studio UX2. Initial impressions - well, uh ... I will have to learn the software first (hope that a MIT degree in programming is not a prerequisite for doing this at home). The intended comparisons are to be made against a (good quality but unwieldy) pre-amp and stereo mic setup (I am still leaning towards the later, but ... who knows).
    Once again, I am very grateful for the input.

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Like I said before, "Generation Gap?"

    I thought this was a jazz guitar forum.

    If your playing is too loud when you shed, thus annoying others, you have two choices. A. Stop. Lay off. Find a good time to shed that is amenable to all. B. Find a quiet axe that you can use in those quiet times.

    Don't confuse "practicing" with "rehearsal". Practicing requires you to play the instrument. Period. Music only. Rehearsal means using your gig sound to check it, tweak it, etc.

    Gizmos, etc., are useless for shedding jazz guitar. As are headphones. How many trumpet players do you know that shed with headphones?

    The sound comes from you, only, if you've got some talent. The gizmos are a distraction re: practice or shedding.

    None of the expert players I've ever encountered need or want jive gizmos for their core shed time. Maybe a metronome.

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    I agree with Donelson. Your sound comes from you, not your gear.

    I will say that having good equipment, if used correctly, will do nothing but enhance your sound.

    You can never go wrong with delay or reverb.

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Donelson View Post
    I thought this was a jazz guitar forum.
    You were right.

    If your playing is too loud when you shed, thus annoying others, you have two choices. A. Stop. Lay off. Find a good time to shed that is amenable to all. B. Find a quiet axe that you can use in those quiet times.
    Fortunately I do have more choices.

    How many trumpet players do you know that shed with headphones?
    Weird question. Many trumpeters practice with the mute plugged into the trumpet's bell, and probably would love to be able to practice with headphones, if it were possible.

    Last edited by Fidelcaster; 11-16-2008 at 08:31 AM.

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    I don't use amp modeler units. I really haven't found that much use for them outside commercial recording--for that they do come in handy. But even for recording music for that purpose a lot of times I still find it more desirable to plug into an amp and just mic the amp.

    For actual practice, I can't see any reason to use a modeler. As Donelson pointed out when you shed your working on your own sound on the instrument. A lot of times, if it's too late to plug in, I'll just play my ES175 acoustically. That's plenty loud enough for me to shed whatever (scales, arps, chord solos, etc.) When I can plug in I still don't really turn up very loud and the actual sound is only secondary to that of the actual practice of the instrument. The entire point for me is to further my knowledge of the instrument, the tunes, style(s) of music, and musicality in general. I say shed for shed's sake and forget the gizmos. After all, if your sound is great but you can't really play proficiently no gizmo in the world's gonna fix that.

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    I can certainly appreciate that viewpoint, bdrhythm. It's beneficial to be able to produce a good sound without the aid of effects. And it's certainly possible - perhaps preferable - to work on technique and the application of theory to the instrument without amplification.

    However, my jazz improv instructor strongly recommends that we practice under gig conditions (volume and posture in particular) as much as possible.

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Fine. I think you're confusing "rehearsal" with "practice." They're two different animals. I think, in some cases, the only way to make this clear would be with a one-on-one study session with me or one of my colleagues: as such one might very well leave the studio either inspired, enraged, or sobbing...that's my world (I've been doing this a very long time and I know and have had the honor of studying with, gigging with, and just playin with some of the greatest guitarists on earth).

    Happy Holly Daze and best o' luck
    bdrhythm

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    I assume you're referring to "However, my jazz improv instructor strongly recommends that we practice under gig conditions..."

    I'm not confused about that. That's *his* recommendation.

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by bdrhythm View Post
    I think, in some cases, the only way to make this clear would be with a one-on-one study session with me or one of my colleagues: as such one might very well leave the studio either inspired, enraged, or sobbing...that's my world (I've been doing this a very long time and I know and have had the honor of studying with, gigging with, and just playin with some of the greatest guitarists on earth).

    Gee thanks for that... I'm impressed. How about posting or linking us to some of your recordings?

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    I use the Adrenalinn II, sometimes for recording, sometimes for practice, sometimes for rehearsal too. It depends from several factors, but I like it on those occasions.

    I use the Mesa V-twin too, for similar purposes. Live: I had at least one signal from this one into the console, besides the other line-out of my Fender Superchamp. It gives consistency to my tone.

    Whoever disses the POD, I don't give much of a credit, sorry. It's not a toy. I saw several good players on live with it. Not awesome, but usable thingy.