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  1. #1

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    Hi guys.

    I was wondering if there are more "easy" examples like the first standard Autumn Leaves in The_Beginners_Guide_To_Jazz_Guitar.

    In addition, some of the other examples in (the listening section) of the beginners guide are a bit too advanced in regards to drop chords, more complicated, etc at this point.

    AL's chords, melody, and comping was a perfect after you've practised the basics of the first chapter.

    Looking forward to a few answers.

    Best regards, Anders

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders1
    Hi guys.

    I was wondering if there are more "easy" examples like the first standard Autumn Leaves in The_Beginners_Guide_To_Jazz_Guitar.

    In addition, some of the other examples in (the listening section) of the beginners guide are a bit too advanced in regards to drop chords, more complicated, etc at this point.

    AL's chords, melody, and comping was a perfect after you've practised the basics of the first chapter.

    Looking forward to a few answers.

    Best regards, Anders

  4. #3

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    Here's some I like.

    The progression is straight blues in Bb



    This is just a nice melody and easy. Also in Bb but starts on the IV.


  5. #4
    The Shadow of Your Smile is worth a look at. And chords can be simplified to a degree that's now all that complicated.

  6. #5
    Thanks for the tips, and welcoming as well.

    I will defiantly look into these examples.

    Anyway, I'm Anders 43 years old from Sweden. Been playing guitar for 3 years in total. Self taught, so getting into jazz guitar is quite a ride.

    Have a great weekend,

    Cheers

  7. #6
    Hi Anders - The first song my teacher gave me after Autumn Leaves was "All The Things You Are" aka ATTYA.
    Why? Because it's a longer form to master; it has the minor ii-V and other harmonic devices common to jazz standards; it gets called at jams and even advanced players don't complain; jazz fans and non-fans recognize the tune; it lays easily on the fretboard for chord melody; it has enough space that you can work out all kinds of subs, arpeggios and scales; and Jerome Kern is a freakin' great songwriter. Oh, and there's hundreds of recorded versions from Tommy Dorsey to Dizzy & Charlie to Brad Mehldau.
    That said, I prefer to learn songs in pairs to avoid the tedium of working on one thing for weeks. So a jazz blues, as mentioned above (maybe not a Bird blues, yet), would be rewarding for many of the same reasons as ATTYA but also because variations on the blues form show up everywhere in jazz music.
    Best luck.

  8. #7
    Thanks again guys!

    Looking into the songs now.

    Is there anyone who knows if The Easy Guide To Jazz Guitar Chords eBook has more beginner standards like Autumn Leaves with, chord sheets, backing tracks, melody examples, etc?

    Thank you.

  9. #8

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    I would stick to songs instead of buying books. You can Google a lead sheet for just about anything. Check Google images. But take my advice cautiously, I'm not very good lol

  10. #9

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    Blue Bossa
    Beautiful Love

  11. #10

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    Tune Up is good for practicing a series of major II - V - Is plus a turnaround.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders1
    Hi guys.

    I was wondering if there are more "easy" examples like the first standard Autumn Leaves in The_Beginners_Guide_To_Jazz_Guitar.
    I'm not sure I entirely understand your question. As someone who has been on a jazz guitar learning journey I can share what I have found helpful.

    1) It's all about learning songs. Not scales or exercises. Learn songs you like not because someone said it's a must know standard. Why? Because creating joy is the number one goal.
    2) Learn the melody, really know it. Learn it on one string. Learn it in multiple fret board locations. (this is where knowing how to read standard notation comes in handy)
    3) When playing chords to a song try and keep the voicings in the same proximity on the neck, don't jump around if you can avoid it. This is where knowing multiple chord voicings including drop 2 and drop 3 voicings comes in handy (see chart below)
    4) Learn about chord substitution basics. Here's one: you can approach any chord with it's V chord so in Autumn Leaves slip in a quick A7 before the D7.
    5) Beware of buying too many books,video courses and watching endless YouTube "lessons" It can be a real time waster. Nothing beats sitting down with your guitar and a lead sheet and trying to work something out on your own. Again knowing how to read music is invaluable.
    6) When starting to improvise know were your 3rd and 7th are for each chord you are on.

    How about My Romance for another standard to works on? Catchy (easy) melody, typical jazz chord cadences. But do you like the tune? Does it speak to you?

    Jazz Chord Voicings and Drop 2.pdf

  13. #12
    Learning to solo, to improvise, to essentially rewrite a melody over existing harmony can be a tricky concept when it comes to separating the forest from the trees.
    Here's a tune that's got a very similar set of changes to Autumn leaves. Listening to this will let you see how something that may sound different can be so similar. Bill Evans plays this tune in G/Eminor, which some people play Autumn Leaves in. He does switch to something like the key of B and then returns to G. He does this a lot; modulating keys, but have a listen and see if you can see the theme from MASH and its relationship to the form of Autumn Leaves as related.
    I know it was helpful for me when I was learning to listen to tunes that were related. It really helped me to "get it".

  14. #13
    ---
    Last edited by Anders1; 02-27-2021 at 04:27 PM. Reason: edit

  15. #14
    Thanks.

    Jazz is very complicated so following the beginner book examples is a great way to start. At least for me. You learn the chords, the comping, standards, the melody, arpeggios etc. *And maybe after that you can start to improvise.


    You can't paint the house before you have a foundation, floors, walls, and roof etc.

    Since there are tons of advices, it's very easy to get lost; I've been there before, as many others. That's why I wanted more examples like AL in the early chapters.


    But, thank you for the tips.

    Quote Originally Posted by alltunes
    I'm not sure I entirely understand your question. As someone who has been on a jazz guitar learning journey I can share what I have found helpful.

    1) It's all about learning songs. Not scales or exercises. Learn songs you like not because someone said it's a must know standard. Why? Because creating joy is the number one goal.
    2) Learn the melody, really know it. Learn it on one string. Learn it in multiple fret board locations. (this is where knowing how to read standard notation comes in handy)
    3) When playing chords to a song try and keep the voicings in the same proximity on the neck, don't jump around if you can avoid it. This is where knowing multiple chord voicings including drop 2 and drop 3 voicings comes in handy (see chart below)
    4) Learn about chord substitution basics. Here's one: you can approach any chord with it's V chord so in Autumn Leaves slip in a quick A7 before the D7.
    5) Beware of buying too many books,video courses and watching endless YouTube "lessons" It can be a real time waster. Nothing beats sitting down with your guitar and a lead sheet and trying to work something out on your own. Again knowing how to read music is invaluable.
    6) When starting to improvise know were your 3rd and 7th are for each chord you are on.

    How about My Romance for another standard to works on? Catchy (easy) melody, typical jazz chord cadences. But do you like the tune? Does it speak to you?

    Jazz Chord Voicings and Drop 2.pdf

  16. #15

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    I would say...

    There Will Never be Another You
    Blue Bossa

  17. #16

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    What I recently discovered and has really helped me is using garageband to create my own backing tracks. There are tons of backing tracks for you to solo on, but only few (or none?) where you have to do the comping for a soloist or vocalist.

    So, I set the speed on the metronome and play the melody. Then I loop the melody, add a drummer and grab my base. I add a very simple baseline. Next is comping time. I try a simple approach, inversions, all kinds of things. The key thing is that I have to make it work with the 'vocalist'.

    You might give it a try.

    BTW, Autumn Leaves is my go to standard to try out new voicings. If I can make it work in a song that I know, the chances that I'll remember those voicings is much bigger.
    Last edited by Joeontheguitar; 02-28-2021 at 12:40 PM.

  18. #17
    Thank you for all the answers!

    In the beginners guide there are examples/lessons similar to this one. There Will Never Be Another You (For Guitar)

    It's a perfect example where you can listen to the complete song, plus see the chord progressions, melody structure and use a backing track.

    Some lessons are a bit too complicated though, so I was wishing for more easy standards.

    Cheers

    / Anders

  19. #18

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    After Autumn Leaves you could tackle Fly Me to the Moon. Many common characteristics but also some new themes/chord progressions. It's also a song that can be played in many tempos and styles..... which opens other avenues of jazz expression.

  20. #19
    Hi again.

    Been under the weather for some time.

    Anyway, to be more clear. I meant if you knew another easy 'chord melody arrangement' like AL.
    Thank you guys.
    More "easy" examples like Autumn Leaves?-ccc-png

  21. #20

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    I'm kind of interested in what you might mean by "easy"...

    - easy to hear?
    - easy to figure out?
    - easy to learn?
    - easy to develop?
    - easy to play?

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by pauln
    I'm kind of interested in what you might mean by "easy"...

    - easy to hear?
    - easy to figure out?
    - easy to learn?
    - easy to develop?
    - easy to play?
    To finish your intro to jazz standards, here’s an easy chord melody for AutumnLeaves.

    Read the thread next time buddy.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders1
    To finish your intro to jazz standards, here’s an easy chord melody for AutumnLeaves.

    Read the thread next time buddy.
    Sounds like you're still under the weather.

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by pauln View Post
    Sounds like you're still under the weather.
    .....

  25. #24

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    Satin Doll is a good tune. Learn the melody on the high strings add the bass on the low strings and then add the middle for a bit of colour.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by mmark View Post
    Satin Doll is a good tune. Learn the melody on the high strings add the bass on the low strings and then add the middle for a bit of colour.
    Thanks Mark I will look into Satin doll as well.

    I'm also investigating Solar.

  27. #26

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    Solar's quite interesting but it's one of these circular tunes, 12 bars that just go round and round and round... It looks fairly simple but you might find it quite hard to keep up with it! But you must find out.

  28. #27

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    The Approaching the Standards books might be of interest to you but you need to read standard notation. Make sure you get the C instruments version.

  29. #28

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    Try any song that inspires you. You don't have to play the chords as they are written and can really simplify the progression. And remember you can play them in whatever key you want so you can take advantage of nice open chords.

  30. #29

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    It sounds like you are looking for songs where the melody sits comfortably on top of the chords. All the Things You Are, Beautiful Love, and Misty would be good starting places. Sometimes the melody note might be an extension of the underlying chord such as a 9th.