1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hi all, if this is the wrong forum, please take down this post;


    I've been playing for 20 sum years.. I play in church, and occasional wedding gigs.. I have no music theory under my belt.. I just learned how to play on my own, and played by ear (there was no youtube when I was young), and have been able to copy licks just by listening.. I can your usual basic song down to the note.. by copying and watching guitarists, I have learned more chord shapes across the fretboard.. more and more of these kind of styles have been used in church music (think U2)


    6 years ago I discovered blues, but due to college, work and other life activities, I only got familiar with major and minor pentatonic scales.. nothing more.. my playing improved and somehow I can do solos which has different flavors to supplement and integrate into my playing style and music.. its all just very basic.. nothing really fancy.. but I cannot read notes..


    3 years ago, I hired a guitar teacher who specializes in Jazz and theory.. he was able to teach me a bit (whole note scale) and a few simple introductions on music theory but we’re not diving too deep as I just wanted to get information and a bit knowledge on how I can improve my playing, my knowledge of how major and minor pentatonic scales work in Blues context and be able to integrate some Jazz principles in it to be able to put some spice in my music.. sadly our lessons has to stop because my wife gave birth and havent had any time to visit him or him visiting me
    to do our lessons.

    i did read a few threads here, and a few lessons, but im struggling to find a suitable plan in which i can try and do practically in a limited time i have for practicing. I can do a focused 15min practice maybe once or twice a day depending on how busy i am with house chores and helping out with the bub.

    do you have any recommendations and what to do? I can post a little bit of my playing but I’m not sure it religious music is allowed just for the context of assessing where I am in my playing.

    thank you for all your help. I just want to improve but I’m leaning towards Jazz as I have become more mature in my music selection and I feel i’ll be able to do justice in playing my new ES-330. :-)

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    What do YOU call jazz, what do you like to listen to?

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    What do YOU call jazz, what do you like to listen to?
    Since I’m not really well-versed into jazz, i guess the artist THAT got me really interested into learning jazz principles is Julian Lage.

    although I’m not sure if he’s considered a hardcore Jazz, for the past 2 years, Ive listened to him.

    and most recently, Grant Green, although, at that level, I dont know if I’ll ever get even an inch of his knowledge and playing.

    my teacher made me listen to the classics like;

    Miles Davis and Wes Montgomery

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by dreamingJazz View Post
    Since I’m not really well-versed into jazz, i guess the artist THAT got me really interested into learning jazz principles is Julian Lage.

    although I’m not sure if he’s considered a hardcore Jazz, for the past 2 years, Ive listened to him.

    and most recently, Grant Green, although, at that level, I dont know if I’ll ever get even an inch of his knowledge and playing.

    my teacher made me listen to the classics like;

    Miles Davis and Wes Montgomery
    i think Grant is a great starting point. Start with working out some of his licks. I love his solo on Django, for instance, that has some killer lines.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Jazz isn't theory. Its tunes.

    Pick some tunes, learn as much as you can by ear. Learn chords...and an arpeggio for every chord.

    Pick some tunes, we can work through them together here.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    When the squares expect you to zig, zag. Or zeg, zog, or zug.

    No seriously, good advice above. Just don't forget to have fun.

    And swing, if it seems appropriate.