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  1. #101

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    Raney killing it on Dinah.



    Trane and Adderly on Limehouse Blues... anyway you get the picture. Makes sense - those were the tunes they heard as kids...

    the straightahead guys I know wouldn’t know these tunes but would cock a snoot at you for not knowing Dolphin Dance.... there’s never a need to be a dick about rep, so long as we have something in common to play...

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    he great originality of a jazz forum or jazz guitar forum, is to ask questions like I have never read in the jazz magazines I have read for 50 years. One can wonder without complex about The Ultimate Jazz Instrument or the number of standards to know (as the Greats) ... What for? Learn to play or play them in a gig?

    as in many areas, the problem is often in the question. Charles Kettering said "A Problem well stated is a Problem half-solved", and to paraphrase Karl Marx (about Humanity): Jazz never only poses problems it is able to solve

    unless the real function of the forum is to talk talking talk... to feel good in the so called community? It's better than in the Minton's Playhouse, the public doesn't make any noise
    Last edited by Patlotch; 01-28-2020 at 04:37 PM.

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    he great originality of a jazz forum or jazz guitar forum, is to ask questions like I have never read in the jazz magazines I have read for 50 years. One can wonder without complex about The Ultimate Jazz Instrument or the number of standards to know (as the Greats) ... What for? Learn to play or play them in a gig?

    as in many areas, the problem is often in the question. Charles Kettering said "A Problem well stated is a Problem half-solved", and to paraphrase Karl Marx (about Humanity): Jazz never only poses problems it is able to solve

    unless the real function of the forum is to talk talking talk... to feel good in the so called community? It's better than in the Minton's Playhouse, the public doesn't make any noise
    For me it’s a topic of conversation. What shall we talk about? There is No Greater Love.

    There’s many other reasons. But the main one is that jazz for me is that art of musical conversation. It’s not how everyone views it, it’s not even perhaps a good description historically always, but it’s where it lives for me.

  5. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    For me it’s a topic of conversation [...] jazz for me is that art of musical conversation. It’s not how everyone views it, it’s not even perhaps a good description historically always, but it’s where it lives for me.
    I can bring historic water to your mill

    personally, I am not so much Jazzmen as a musician, because too aware of the musical qualities that I miss, and that I clearly hear even more in others, to whom it is difficult to make it heard

    I am Jazzman by my in-depth knowledge of Jazz throughout its history, music but also the life of musicians, their social and racial situation, and what they say about music, the situation of playing with others for an audience. I'm not came to Jazz by guitar, but to guitar by jazz, at 20 years old! it was long before my passion. There is as much "jazz" in my poetry as in my music

    I put all this in my 2002 book, JAZZ ET PROBLEMES DES HOMMES, Livre, 2002 which I had been working on for years, before the Internet. I have brought out an ethic of jazz, as a relationship to oneself and others, and the fact that this part of jazz is of African-American origin, which does not mean that white jazzmen would be devoid. I have established a kind of ethno-musicological proof going back to African music as a social function, without separation from an audience, and the history of the black American people, resuming the work of Leroi Jones

    in a chapter entitled Musician Listening, - de l?écoute musicienne all the answers of the musicians go in the direction of listening to others (musicians are classified according to their age), and to learn from listening to the repertoire, at the time, discs and radio, without images, all by the ears, nothing by the eyes

    Jay McSHANN (1916), George DUVIVIER (1920-1985), Charles MINGUS (1922-1979), Jay Jay JOHNSON (1924-2001), Miles DAVIS (1926-1991), Gerry MULLIGAN (1927-1996), Horace SILVER (1928), Ray BARETTO (1929), Mel LEWIS (1929-1990), Art TAYLOR (1929-1995), Sonny ROLLINS (1930), Slide HAMPTON (1932), Barre PHILLIPS (1934), Roland KIRK (1935-1977), Albert AYLER, (1936-1970), Don CHERRY (1936-1995), Charles LLOYD (1938), Lee MORGAN (1938-1972), Joe McPHEE (1939), Herbie HANCOCK (1940), Eddy LOUISS (1941), Don AYLER (1942), Dave HOLLAND (1946), Bill FRISELL (1951), Kenny WERNER (1952), Bobby WATSON (1953), Pat METHENY (1954), John PATITUCCI (1959), Winton MARSALIS (1961), Scott COLLEY (1962)

    it's even more evident in an other chapter, who give more room for the ancient musicians, II1.3 la création collective, les échanges, l?individualité et le groupe
    Sidney BECHET (1897-1959), Earl HINES (1903-1983), Coleman HAWKINS (1904-1969), Count BASIE (1904-1984), Johnny HODGES (1906-1970), Dickie WELLS (1907-1985), Ben WEBSTER (1909-1973) Harry CARNEY (1910-1974), Jo JONES (1911-1985), Art BLAKEY (1919-1990), Jimmy GIUFFRE (1921), Milt JACKSON (1923-2000), Shorty ROGERS (1924-1994), Bill PERKINS (1924),Max ROACH (1925), Oscar PETERSON (1925), Roy HAYNES (1926), Randy WESTON (1926), John COLTRANE (1926-1967), Stan GETZ (1927-1991), Gerry MULLIGAN (1927-1996), CHARLES Teddy (1928), Pierre MICHELOT (1928), Eric DOLPHY (1928-1964), Bill EVANS (1929-1980), Ornette COLEMAN (1930), Phil WOODS (1931), Slide HAMPTON (1932), Ben RILEY (1933), Steve LACY (1934), Gato BARBIERI (1934), Billy HIGGINS (1936), Albert AYLER (1936-1970), Joseph JARMAN (1937), François TUSQUES (1938), Daniel HUMAIR (1938), Chick COREA (1941), Malachi FAVORS (1927), Lester BOWIE (1941), Joachim KÜHN (1944), Keith JARRETT (1945), Tony WILLIAMS (1945-1997), Joe LABARBERA (1948), Harvie SWARTZ (1948), François MECHALI (1950), Kenny WERNER (1952), Kahil EL’ZABAR (1953), Nils LANDGREN (1956), Eliane ELIAS (1960), Matthiew SHIPP (1961), Paolo FRESU (1961), François MOUTIN (1961), Benny GREEN (1963), Vincent COURTOIS (1968), James HURT (1968), Stephano Di BATTISTA (1969), Brad MELDHAU (1970), Sylvain CATHALA (1973)

    so, I don't know 1000 standards, but 1000 jazz musicians men and women, yes, those who, like you say, have made jazz is an art of conversation


    Paul Chambers, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Red Garland, Philly Joe Jones, 1956