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  1. #1

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    I read some topics about where to start learning jazz guitar.

    I have been playing guitar since 12 years.
    I know my chords etc.

    I play mostly acoustic and some electric as well.

    I totally like jazz chords, but I want to improve on chord progressions and soloing.

    Where do I start?

    I made the big mistake in the past to do whatever I like, but I didn't become a better player of it...

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    The best way to learn jazz guitar is to take lessons from an actual guitar teacher!

  4. #3
    What type of lessons?
    Chords, progressions?

    I want to make a sort of roadmap on what to practice etc.

  5. #4

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    check out the lessons on the Jazz Guitar Online site, parent site of this forum.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Piler
    That's a short answer.
    What type of lessons?
    Chords, progressions?
    I want to make a sort of roadmap on what to practice etc.
    Hi Joel
    I am no expert, but what helped me most was learning the fretboard thoroughly, so I know where to find those notes, scales, arpeggios and chords, but since you have played a while you might know this already.

    I would have started with something like this:

    Find one Jazz tune you like and try to learn it well. Listen to different versions of that tune.

    Learn to play the chords of the tune first, then maybe chord melody and finally some improvisation/solo.

    To better be able to improvise find a lesson on how to "analyze" a tune (to find out which chord progressions and keys you need to improvise over). I think there is a lesson about this on Jazzguitar.be.

    Try to play the chords, arpeggios and scales which "matches" the chord progression of the tune you like.

    And if you have the time, you should also practice this:

    Arpeggios:
    Learn the major, dominant and minor arpeggios in the key of C at first, in all positions over the neck. Learn the intervals and the notes of the arpeggios (Root-3-5-7 etc). When you know C, continue to play in all 12 keys. Same pattern repeats.

    Chords:
    Learn the maj7, dom7 and min7 chords in the key of C at first, in all or at least some positions over the neck. Learn the intervals and the notes of the chords (Root-3-5-7 etc). When you know C, continue to play in all 12 keys. Same pattern repeats.

    Scales:
    Learn the C major scale all over the neck, then in all 12 keys. And of course the "dominant" and "minor" scales.

    Practice chords, arpeggios and scales over a 251 progression in the key of C - Dm7-G7-Cmaj7, then all the the other keys.

    I dont know if this would be called a road map, but its my 2 cents

  7. #6

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    Harmonize the major scale i.e. Cmaj7 Dmin7 Emin7 Fmaj7 G7 Amin7 Bmin7b5.

  8. #7

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    Yup, I'd chime in with chord scales using drop 2 chords etc.

    First play the chord scale then go through the chord scale using arpeggios.

    Also sing these arpeggios as you play them.

    Make sure to apply your new chords to jazz tunes.

    Easy tunes to start with are Autumn Leaves, Tune Up and Blue Bossa.

  9. #8

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    Lessons from a Jazz guitar teacher, learn Jazz harmony.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Piler
    That's a short answer.
    What type of lessons?
    Chords, progressions?
    I want to make a sort of roadmap on what to practice etc.
    Get a TEACHER to help you construct a roadmap. There is NO better way.

  11. #10

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    Hi,

    I've been playing guitar for years like you but I only started learning jazz 2 and a half years ago. I just played my first gig in a trio last week so that really felt like a milestone. I would echo what others have said about taking lessons - that is the best idea if you want to progress quicker although be prepared for some hard work which is frustrating at times. The rules or guidelines to playing jazz are actually fairly simple but is quite difficult to execute, at least at first. You also need to know some basic theory. Pick a tune you like and learn the melody and chords in a few places on the fretboard. Autumn leaves is a good choice as it is fairly simple and contains major and minor ii v i progressions. I would suggest frets 1 to 5, frets 5 to 9 and frets 9 to 13 as areas. Then practise playing chord tones (arpeggios) on strong beats (1 and 3 for a 4/4 tune) in each area. After a while you can try connecting the chord tones with scale or chromatic tones. Then try introducing rhythmic variety and outside harmony. Good luck! Rick

  12. #11
    Thanks guys!!!!! A teacher it is!

  13. #12

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    Even though online lessons are very worthwhile, I would suggest to try to find a teacher in your area to have lessons in person.
    More important than anything is to listen to lots and lots of jazz. Then when you find a recording you like, just learn it and play along with the original.

  14. #13

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    Hi Joe
    With you on this one. Been playing a while - could pick up a songbook & accompany myself nicely - could I pick up a jazz music sheet and improvise - no way.
    But the latter isn't a million miles away from the former, and what is working for me is:

    You DO need to know your scales
    You DO need to know your arpeggios
    BUT you can start slow and easy
    Take a simple major key tune (I used 'All of Me') & play the tune till you know it.
    Play the chords as arpeggios again till you know them without the book.
    (Choose chords that are close on the fingerboard so you're not hopping around.)

    When you're comfortable playing the tune through, mix in one or two arpeggio notes - if possible with a friend or looper supplying the 'chord' chords behind you - the tune is there but you are moving above and below the notes of the tune, and your additions all sound in-tune!

    The trick of course is to make this better, so you fit scale notes in that aren't in the arpeggio, but only ones that sound good - but that's later.
    This is where I'm at now - every now and again I try to learn a new scale when I come across an awkward chord e.g. diminished 7 recently, but by and large I can look at a simple tune and make a good attempt - VERY VERY SLOWLY.

    Please be in touch - I'd like to hear how you're getting on.

    By the way - Sheryl Bailey is a seriously good player, but probably not the sort of teacher you're looking for at the moment (apart from the cost).


    Very best wishes
    John

  15. #14

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    I spent a lot of time on theory, scales, chords, and arpeggios but felt discouraged until I figured out how to really learn some tunes. So I've been learning tunes using the following resources:

    Comping and Chord Melody: Rich Severson - 99centguitarlessons.com - (he also has improv and transcribed solo material)
    Lead: Robert Conti's "Ticket to Improv" dvds and "The Jazz Lines" book/dvds

    Being able to play a chord melody, then comp, then play a hip solo over a tune is quite satisfying. And you'll learn new chords in the process as they appear in the comping and chord melody studies. So I'm learning the tunes that both of them cover in their material. I also spent some time with Jimmy Bruno and he is great too, but I'm having more fun with Robert Conti right now.

    Jimmy will have you improvising more freely from the beginning, but it's hard to make it sound like jazz as a beginner. Robert will have you sounding like jazz from the get go, but you have to learn many of his transcribed solos first and then get through "The Jazz Lines" before you can really improvise well. Opposite approaches I guess. But I'm okay with that as I'm having a blast hearing the sounds coming out of my guitar. You couldn't go wrong with Jimmy or Robert in my opinion.

  16. #15

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    Learn tunes. Pick a tune you like and start by learning to play the chords. Learn the melody and accompany yourself with the chords using a recording device. Learn the major scales and melodic minor scales. Know the 3rd, 5th and 7th of the chords. Play around with scales and arpeggios until you get bored. Then learn some licks of players you like. Apply those licks to tunes. Eventually, start transcribing solos and you'll learn how players use all that stuff when improvising. There's a ton of other stuff you will pick up on the way.

  17. #16

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    Joe:

    Lessons it is. In person. But IMO, the agenda and goals are all important.

    I've been wanting to learn jazz for decades. Didn't have the confidence to approach it. Finally realized where I needed to start was not with anything theoretical, but with the changes implicit in the blues forms I like to play. I could hear this stuff, could only get so far by ear.

    So I found a very soulful and bluesy player (Bob Devos) and asked him to show me the changes. Chords mostly. And also songs. He agreed, suggested that I relearn reading also (had studied classical for a few years long ago, as a more or less separate activity. And, on a parallel track, I should start playing scales, intervals up and down the fretboard.

    I feel lucky that I knew what I wanted, and that I found a receptive teacher, who could very sensibly expand my goals and get me started. At least for me, this in person interaction is essential. I need a mentor as much as I need an instructor.
    MD

  18. #17

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    I am new, I have little knowledge to jazz. I´ve listened to some Miles Davis, but that´s about it..

    I want to learn, I want to experience new music: Jazz music

    Recommendations, artists to start with, what to explore +++

    How much do I want to know? Well, picture this:

    If your kid came to you and says «I want to learn all that you know about Jazz music»

    What would you do?

  19. #18

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    If you like horns start with Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Chet baker. Move to Charlie Parker, Sony Stitt, Sony Rollins, John Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley. If you like piano, check Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, Art Tatum, Count Basie, Oscar Peterson then you can check Bill Evans, Thelonius Monk, Hank Jones, Bud Powell. I only named a few that popped in my head immediatelly, there s many more talented players, but you gotta listen to all and let your ears decide which way to go.

  20. #19

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    Are you in a place where there's live music? If there's any way, see live jazz. It's the best way to see the process of what's going on, watch musicians exchange ideas, find a flow, feel a good night, or a bad one... Jazz is a live music. Jazz is a music that didn't exist the moment before that recording. To really understand jazz, you should understand the process and seeing it being made has been the best lesson for me.

    A teacher told me this early on. I didn't get what he was saying until live music became a part of my life. Then I got it and the recordings became much more than the notes contained within, they became a document of a live process.
    Don't get caught up in the details. The excitement is in the creative process. Do it, and be around other people who are doing it.

    David

  21. #20

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    For jazz guitar some key access points are Kenny Burrell "Midnight Blue," Gran Green "Grantstand," Wes Montgomery "The Incredible Guitar of Wes Montgomery." These are pretty compelling, blues based bop records from the 60s.

  22. #21

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    What kind of music do you normally listen to?

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Groover1999
    ...

    If your kid came to you and says «I want to learn all that you know about Jazz music»

    What would you do?
    You mean as a listener, or as a player? For the latter, I'd say be careful what you wish for. Please realise that to become accomplished (not necessarily great or even "good") at Jazz guitar it will take something in the order of the oft quoted 10,000 hours. Even for the ones who think they're special, gifted or somehow "different" (ie, the ones who feel they "mastered" much simpler styles of music in way less time! ).

    On the other hand, if you just wanna broaden your listening a little, get Spotify and download compilations of all the period styles, and gradually find the stuff that you like. Most people who listen to Jazz guitar are jazz guitarists themselves, so at some point you may wanna pick up a few tunes for your modest personal enjoyment, if so, check out the lessons section of this site. Otherwise get a teacher and settle in for the long. long ride...

  24. #23

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    I was the same, I knew I liked "Jazz" but had no idea what i liked! I bought a jazz compilation album. I tried to find a short one, so got a 2 cd set rather than one of the 500 songs sets (thats too much). I put both CD's in the car and listened to them. If there was a song that particularly jumped out to me, I'd explore more into that artist. I found I love Mingus, Django, and some more modern stuff. I also found I was less into some of the obvious big name stuff.

    Every month or so i come back to that album and listen to it again as I begin to hear new things, hear new qualitiy in tracks I'd disregarded before, particularly as my guitar skills develop. I'm also learning trombone, so again, I'm listening for something else in the tracks.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by TruthHertz
    Are you in a place where there's live music? If there's any way, see live jazz. It's the best way to see the process of what's going on, watch musicians exchange ideas, find a flow, feel a good night, or a bad one... Jazz is a live music. Jazz is a music that didn't exist the moment before that recording. To really understand jazz, you should understand the process and seeing it being made has been the best lesson for me.

    A teacher told me this early on. I didn't get what he was saying until live music became a part of my life. Then I got it and the recordings became much more than the notes contained within, they became a document of a live process.
    Don't get caught up in the details. The excitement is in the creative process. Do it, and be around other people who are doing it.

    David
    Yes, this is it. The most important part. Of course, there are countless wonderful recordings, and as your time and budget permit, explore them all. There will be many good recommendations made on this forum. But definitely - go where the music is played!

  26. #25

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    I do think there is a difference between being interested in jazz guitar playing and listening to jazz music.

    I have been playing guitar for 30 years. Mostly folk and blues, mostly acoustic and finger style. However, I have always been impressed by the musicianship of jazz musicians. They represented to me the pinnacle of musical understanding, talent and knowledge. Even more so, it seemed to me, than classical musicians.

    That didn't necessarily mean that I was moved by the 20's and 30's pop music that became the "standards".

    I have found it inspiring to begin by listening to the hard bop and blues inspired guitar of the 60's like Wes Montgomery and Kenny Burrell. Then I listened to the cooler, less bluesy sounds of Jim Hall. Then Joe Pass for his virtuosity. That led me to Martin Taylor, from whom mere mortals can do video exchange lessons.

    My point is that the exploration was more about guitar and jazz technique than listening to jazz standards. Of course, trying to absorb this technique has exposed me to the jazz repertoire. I find I do appreciate and enjoy jazz much more than ever before.

    PS: I found the Ken Burns multi-part documentary on jazz VERY informative. To me it was helpful in understanding the music, understanding the roots and how over a century and a half jazz has changed and evolved, and helped me appreciate earlier jazz player like Jelly Roll Morton and the amazing Luis Armstrong.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #26

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    Louis Armstrong

    The Lester Young / Billie Holiday recordings with Teddy Wilson on piano.

    Charlie Christian, or any of the Benny Goodman small group recordings.

    Any Charlie Parker.

    Any Miles, but especially the groups with Coltrane, Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock.

    Mingus small groups.

    Coltrane

    Listen to those guys, see what you like, and then find stuff in the same era that is close to what you like.

  28. #27

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    Alternatively start with the here and now.

    There are so many new generation jazz artists around the world doing beautiful things, immerse yourself in the vibrancy and immediacy of today's music. Some of my favourites:











    and who said big band music is a thing of the past? I saw Kurt do this with Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Centre Orchestra, it was Ace or fully sick, or do they say today dope. Boom!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiw8CTK2o_Q


    .. and of course go back and learn from the past masters.
    Last edited by gggomez; 07-27-2016 at 01:41 AM.

  29. #28

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    the replies here have been great, and is exactly what I wished for!

    I will try to reply some questions here:

    It´s for listening

    I listen to all kinds of music. That´s not true, I despise a lot of whats out there, the music that´s catchy, you can run along a bop your head to it, but´s it doesn´t stay with me or move me. And I´m trying to understand why I´m suddenly into Kanye West. I dont like his style music, but I appreciate that he´s trying to do something with hip hop that few people dare do: reinvent it!

    But I can name some names: Prince(everything he´s ever penned! And artists where he´s produced, like Judith Hill), Beck, Clapton, Hendrix, Warren Zevon(also a great, great guy. I miss him..) There, there are some musicians I like.

    huge digression: but I like to distinguish between artists and musicians, the latter is both, but more and more famous people are no musicians. They don´t know how to play an instrument, they might own a Martin custom guitar and sit with it on the mtv music awards, but their no musicians. Their "artists". They shock, live public lives, and sing(several not even that good). These things woves me for the future of music.

    Then again I might just be a cliché, who want´s to remember the good old days..

  30. #29

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    OK, so probably your best entry into jazz from the people you like is via Prince and Jeff Beck.

    Beck did a pretty famous version of "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat". Check that out. Then listen to the Mingus original. Then a few other version. Beck played with Jan Hammer, who played with Mahavishnu Orchestra, so check some of that stuff out. That might lead you to John McLaughlin, and eventually Miles Davis' electric period.

    I'm not sure there's a ton you can learn about jazz from Prince directly, but he made me think of Quincy Jones, who is a little idiosyncratic as a jazz artist, but well worth checking out. From there, just investigate the people he's played with.

    Other people you might want to check out:

    George Benson - Best known by the general public for his pop stuff like "On Broadway" and "Breezin'" but is actually a MONSTER player.

    Mike Stern - Played with Miles during his electric period, and has some Hendrix influence. More of a fusion guy, but very accessible.

    John Scofield - Another fusion guy. Also played with Miles. (In fact he and Stern were both in the band at the same time at one point). Very unusual style for a guitarist. Probably my personal favorite.

    Russell Malone - Best known for being in Diana Krall's band, but he's been on the scene for a good long while. He's not especially unusual in any way, but he's very good with a classic sound and vocabulary. You can learn a lot about straight-ahead jazz from him.

    Wes Montgomery - Personally, I'm not a huge fan. But lots of guitarists are, and he's been hugely influential.

    I'm focusing on guitar players here, but obviously, you should listen to horn players and pianists, too.

  31. #30

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    not a huge fan of wes - that really is an unusual thing to say. (so don't be put off!) along with ray brown (double bass) i would say wes is one of the most intuitive and immediately appealing players in the music

    try d natural blues

  32. #31

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    I'd sit 'em down with some Joe Lovano, some Wes and Kenny, Miles of course, and Stan Getz, and "Naima" or "My Favorite Things" from 'Trane. Not difficult listening, the tunes which sucked me into the jazz whirlpool myself.

  33. #32

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    so many great contributions from you all, I´m very grateful. I´m listening to Wes Montgomery, but it doesn´t fit as background music for reading. Does anyone know any artists that fit well for: reading, study-music

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad
    not a huge fan of wes - that really is an unusual thing to say. (so don't be put off!) along with ray brown (double bass) i would say wes is one of the most intuitive and immediately appealing players in the music

    try d natural blues
    I'm aware. It just doesn't grab me. I can't say why. Maybe it's a contrary streak or something. I'm not a big fan of the Beatles either, which makes some of my friends lose their friggin' minds.

  35. #34

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    Hi everyone,

    I am a classical guitarist who plays bits and bobs of flamenco. I have listened to jazz for a long time now. It makes up most of my playlist. Love "modern" stuff like Chick Corea, weather report, Jaco etc. But also adore pretty much all the classics with my favourite guitarists being Joe Pass, django, wes, pat metheny.

    I don't struggle with anything technically that I have come across so far, but learning pieces seems really counter productive to the jazz process.

    I have started to transcribe django, the album kind of blue and wes songs. I should start analyzing the solos in relation to the harmony (which I am a bit stuck on how this should be done)

    I play a classical and flamenco guitar and would love to start arranging tunes as well as playing solos.

    I have a few books but I am a bit lost at what to do.


    Thanks Everyone!

  36. #35

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    You're at an advantage because you already have good guitar technique. As ragman says, you want to know about chord construction, with attention to seventh chords. Then you can analyze lines against the chords in the tune. Pay attention to which chord tones the soloist is targeting. Start with earlier stuff. Modern stuff tends to make much more use of extended and substitute chords, which might be a little confusing at first ("It doesn't look like he's targeting ANY chord tones there!")

    Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" is an easy read with written examples for many things, though may emphasize Chord-Scale Theory a bit too much. (CST is a bit controversial around here. Nothing wrong with it, but is more applicable to modern stuff, and may not give you the focus on chord tones that you need).

    Learn tunes. Find as many ways to voice the chords in the tunes as possible. Try to play it differently every time. Learning Joe Pass arrangements is good for getting used to some of the fingerings that people use, but you don't want to get locked in to only one way of playing a tune. Learn the chords and the melodies, and then try to come up with your own arrangements.

    Experiment. If it sounds good to you, it IS good.

  37. #36

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    I know a bit about music theory, but I don't FEEL it if that makes sense. Can't relate it to the fretboard as I haven't used those skills much.

    Yesterday and today, I transcribed django's minor swing and its chords. I then looked at the arpeggios used and played them in all positions. I also looked at django's lines and when he plays chord tones on what beat etc

    Is this a correct approach? I have a goodish ear, so I will start with a few wes records maybe impressions?

  38. #37

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    I'm not a jazz player first and foremost, but I am a guitar instructor and I'll tell you what I think your answer is based on your post. Learn theory. Learn absolutely everything about how music is constructed, because that will allow you to play anything over any chord progression in any key and to have an instant set of options at your fingertips. Internalize it to the point where you can stop thinking about it and just play.

  39. #38

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    Have you considered lessons? I've been playing for about 25 years but only recently started lessons with a local jazz instructor. Like the OP, technique isn't my problem, and we haven't really touched on technique in the lessons. We just work on theory and songs. And all the questions that I pile up during the week, I can get a good thorough answer for on lesson day. Plus , my teacher can see what I'm good at (sometimes I surprise him) and what I'm bad at (sometimes I surprise him) and he adjusts the material accordingly. It's really done wonders for my playing in a short amount of time.

  40. #39

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    I'm sure you already have this, but I find it useful to think about what "jazz" is and why its different than "classical". There are a thousand theories and opinions. You will undoubtably find your own. I can only share what I came to and how it guides me. Someone will likely take offense and insist that their understanding of jazz is truer or more pure. Still, here goes...

    For me and "aha" moment was formulating an understanding that "jazz" differed from "classical", or even the folk I was more accustomed to, in that it was about an agreed to form rather than a specific composition. Jazz means that you, the player, must take the agreed form and interpret it in your own way. That is very different than classical guitar, or even a pop tune. You learn "Here Comes the Sun" by the Beatles and play it the same every time. "Sevilla" isn't a form, its a precise memorized piece. A jazz standard has at its core a melody, often originating as a vocal part in a decidedly non-jazz musical or pop tune, and an agreed to chord changes. The rest is up to the group of musicians on the spot.

    A lot like blues, actually. Except in blues there are a very limited number of agreed to forms. 12 bars: 4 of I7, 2 of IV7, 2 of I7, 2 of V7, etc. Of course there are a bunch of variations, but they don't stray too far from the basic form. I think it is hard today for a guitar player not to have played over a 12 bar blues. For most, its comfortable. You do a mix of on-the-spot innovation with a bunch of canned elements you've played a thousand times. But you never play a 12 bar blues the same twice. It is very satisfying to play, but can get a bit limiting at times. Imagine having dozens and dozens of forms to play with, not just the same 12 bar blues?

    So where do you begin? Learn a bunch of "forms" and be loose with it? Learn as many jazz standards like "All the Things You Are", "Autumn Leaves", "Misty", etc., as you can. Learn the melody and the basic form like you would a blues tune. Play them loosely and imaginatively. Just let your ears and experience lead you. Or you could focus on understanding how musicians develop more sophisticated compositions on the spot with no more than the melody and a bare harmonization as a guide. There is a lot of theory out there on this. This is a music tradition that is 150 years old, so that well is deep. To be honest it is what draws me in. Or you could focus on learning the specific idioms that define "jazz" playing. The theory on how one might improvise jazz doesn't teach you how Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Herb Ellis, or Joe Pass actually improvised. For that you might want to transcribe a lot of recordings.

    Or all of the above. But knowing what it is about jazz that is attracting you and how it is different than the classical music you have been doing will help guide you and keep you moving forward.

  41. #40
    Decide what you want to do first. Is your goal to be able to play jazz with other musicians? Are there local jams in your area? Are private lessons an option?

    JAZZ guitar is a pretty diverse study. Means different things to different people. There's comping, soloing , playing "solo guitar" in a jazz style. You're not alone in being overwhelmed at how to approach. You're also not alone if you don't really know the answer to a lot of these questions for yourself. Most of them are going to be better answered if you're studying with a teacher or playing with other musicians.

    Good luck.

  42. #41

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    Some very VERY good points here. Still don't know quite what I am looking for.

    I guess that listening to a lot of jazz in my life has always interested me. And interestingly, a lot of the time I find the jazz guitar doesn't quite fit in or sometimes I find it unnecessary but other times it is perfect. I adore Joe Pass, he is my favorite guitarist. It can be a bit like the classical guitar in that sense, that it's either the main focus or not there at all. I don't know I'm just talking rubbish lol

    Interesting...

    I think the thing I will do is transcribe and learn theory. I have done Minor Swing and I'll see you in my dreams by django. My next step will be just playing the arpeggios up and down in different patterns and analysing what django played harmonically? I think transcribing is a safe bet, because I can't go wrong right?

    One area I have trouble with is deciding voicings but I guess that is another thing

  43. #42

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    Get a teacher

  44. #43

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    Learn some jazz blues, easy enough to get into and the basis of so much.

  45. #44

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    The essential difference between Jazz and Classical is that in jazz you improvise. So improvise.

  46. #45
    The essential difference between Jazz and Classical is that in jazz you improvise. So improvise.
    You can improvise for the rest of your life and still not be playing in a jazz style though. You don't learn the STYLE by simply improvising more on your own. If you don't have the style down, this isn't particularly helpful.

    In my mind, the most distinctive difference between jazz and classical style is in the phrasing and "style". Improvisation is an element as well , but it's not the primary distinction. On one hand, you can play classical music "in a jazz style". At the sane time, you can improvise over jazz changes all day in a soulless non-jazz way.

    Jazz doesn't simply equal improvisation. Jazz is a style.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 12-08-2016 at 01:42 PM.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonzo
    The essential difference between Jazz and Classical is that in jazz you improvise. So improvise.
    Incorrect.

    For example, this isn't jazz. But it is improvisation, and it is classical.


    (Imagine being able to do THAT! Wow!)

    Not a widespread skill I'll admit in classical, but it is done nonetheless. You might also want to check out Robert Levin, or Jonah's friend who can improvise baroque suites at the harpischord.

    Jazz is a musical language, and a tradition that involves improvisation much like pretty much all of the world musical traditions aside from Western classical (and even that is coming back, the violinist one of the bands I play in teachers improvisation to classical musicians at music college.)
    Last edited by christianm77; 12-08-2016 at 09:25 PM.

  48. #47

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    You get good at a thing by deliberately practicing it. It doesn't matter what most classical musicians do, what some guy in a video does, or what some friend of yours does. The OP needs to decide what the skill he needs to improve is, and practice it deliberately.

  49. #48

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    Last edited by paulcw16; 12-21-2016 at 09:05 PM.

  50. #49

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    don't always go for the greats, whatever artists inspire you to practice is what I would practice although it's good to get into the greats sometimes, also Jody Fisher's book is quite interesting from what i've heard. Check it out.

    Seems like your on the right track.

    Good luck.

  51. #50

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    Hello all. Newbie here with quite a few years' rock and acoustic background but little or no formal training. I've got quite a few jazz guitar tutor books (Baker, Fisher, Fewell, Hal Leonard etc). Wondering where you'd suggest starting? The Mickey Baker one has a manageable number of chords and little or no theory (yippee) but while I like the fact that the chord sequences sound nice they don't really show me what I'm doing. The Jody Fisher one - I find the examples clunky and not very inspiring. Hal Leonard - some nice stuff there that does sound like jazz. Fewell - great but wonder if the theory is beyond me.
    Basically, I'm kind of impatient to get started. Some theory, ok I get it, but I do want to feel like I'm playing something jazzy. For that reason I like the Hal Leonard book best at the moment. Any suggestions???