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  1. #1

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    Hi people!

    I've studied jazz in the past but I've stopped like two years.

    I want to get back to it Could you guys recommend me a method book?

    I've seen lots and lots of "jazz guitar books" but I would like to know your opinion on one good book for a beginner like me.

    Thank you in advance!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Some suggestions

    Jerry Hahn Complete Method for Jazz Guitar Hahn was a jazz rock pioneer following Larry Coryell in the Gary Burton Quartet. Later, he taught jazz guitar at Wichita State University. This book was adapted from his teaching there and columns for Guitar Player. Originally, three volumes. There's a CD. Very useful rules for improvisation at the end.

    Jody Fischer, Complete Jazz Guitar Method There are notation-only and notation and tab versions. Extensive discussion of this book on this forum several years ago.

    Jane Miller, Introduction to Jazz Guitar Berklee instructor. I haven't examined it, but have liked Miller's ocassional columns in Acoustic Guitar

    William Leavitt, A Modern Method for Guitar taught to several generations of guitarists at Berklee. Good for learning reading, scale fingerings. Recently, there's a Jazz Song Book supplement.

    There are good lessons on this site, check the home page. There are also some very useful ebooks listed on that page.

    Also, take a look at Matt Warnock's site
    and Jens Larsen.

    Lots of folks are fans of Mickey Baker's jazz guitar course.

  4. #3

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    It's a tough call. There aren't too many really comprehensive beginning jazz guitar books that are even handed and well organized by level, and proceed one level at a time. The subject is huge, there are by now many styles and the styles keep evolving, etc. Leavitt's books are great but they are more plectrum guitar than jazz guitar. You have to work the jazz stuff in on your own. Jane Miller's book is a pretty good start.

    In general you will need to know scales, chords, arpeggios, tunes (head and comp), lots of jazz language lines/chord outlines, jazz solo language etudes are helpful, and of course playing transcribed solos is a must.


    I'll say this much, if you are an experienced guitarist who wants to get going with jazz guitar here are two chord sources that are useful (There are many others too). I'd put these two in the "just do it and don't think too hard about it" category. You'll be better off having done so. I'm leaving out a lot but it's a start.

    https://www.amazon.com/All-Blues-Jaz...3516386&sr=8-1

    https://www.amazon.com/Leading-Guita...3516418&sr=8-1

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by guga7 View Post
    I would like to know your opinion on one good book for a beginner like me.
    Jazz Guitar Online is not just a forum, it's instructional material and lots more.

    Free Jazz Guitar Lessons

  6. #5

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    Thank you for your tips!

    I'll study at night so I prefer a book to keep me disconected from blue-screen-devices! hehehe

    I'll buy:

    - William Leavitt
    - Jane Miller

    This will keep me busy for a long long time

    Thank you again!

  7. #6

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    I started out (on jazz guitar) on Garrison Fewell's first book :


    Book Recommendations for a Beginning Jazz Guitarist-51jughojezl-_sx373_bo1-204-203-200_-jpg

    Got me off to a good start. Just enough "theory" to understand what you're doing and lots of practical examples in the context of actual progressions and songs.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  8. #7

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    Check out Carol Kaye dot com . Her method is "traditional" but it works!

    Jamey Aebersold Vol 54 Maiden Voyage to put those lessons into practice. If you can comp along or solo over the tracks you would know you have learnt something. Time feel, swing feel is important. Books can only hint at that. Being able to play along will show you up. Lots of guys can spout theory...

    Aebersold's Jimmy Raney's Play Along is a great follow-up.

    Don't get lost in too much theory. Get the arps under your fingers. Follow your ears. And just play along. Play along. And play along. Make mistakes until the mistakes sound good.

    Easier said than done. I think people buy too many books to postpone the inevitable: that they have to play sometimes and that they can't really play but dropping hot terms sure impresses the hell out of someone when you don't have a guitar conveniently at hand. Mea Culpa!!!

  9. #8

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    Carol Kaye has been around for so long she calls Pat Martino "one of the younger ones". Lady can really play and she has earnt the right to be prickly and crotchety.
    Last edited by Jabberwocky; 11-12-2019 at 08:58 AM.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    I started out (on jazz guitar) on Garrison Fewell's first book :


    Book Recommendations for a Beginning Jazz Guitarist-51jughojezl-_sx373_bo1-204-203-200_-jpg

    Got me off to a good start. Just enough "theory" to understand what you're doing and lots of practical examples in the context of actual progressions and songs.
    This!! I was just about to post a recommendation for this book. I have been studying jazz guitar for the past 5 or so years and have purchased numerous courses, books, DVD's etc. and this book by far is the best. As a matter of fact I have sold all my my jazz theory books except this one. It covers everything you need to know for soling over jazz changes. It has enough information to keep you busy for a very long time yet the books is not overwhelming. Study this book and really spend the time to internalize it and then apply the concepts to your favorite tunes. I keep coming back to it and get more and more stuff out of it. It's got all you need...jazz phrasing, playing over 2 5 1's in major and minor, playing over dominant and altered chords. That's really all you need in a nut shell and best of all it is not a scale or mode based approach but a chord tone based approach which is where it is at IMHO.

    What it doesn't have is a primer on chords but see the attached sheet and get a Drop 2 book...I suggest the one by Joseph Alexander
    Attached Images Attached Images
    "6 strings this way and 12 frets that way and a world of mystery in between" Keith Richards on the guitar

  11. #10

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    I've already bought the two I've said before, but I'll keep an eye on that one since everybody seems to like it

    Thank you again!

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    Some suggestions...

    Also, take a look at Matt Warnock's site
    and Jens Larsen.
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Jazz Guitar Online is not just a forum, it's instructional material and lots more.

    Free Jazz Guitar Lessons

    +1
    Midnight Blues

  13. #12

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    Thumbs up for the Fewell book and for the materials on this site as well, although I too prefer a printed book.

    Also Joe Pass' books are tops, as are Wes Montgomery transcriptions.

  14. #13

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    You already have more recommendations than you can use, but my eye was caught recently by "The Guitarist's introduction to Jazz" by Randy Vincent. I have several of his other books on more narrow topics, and he is one of the best out there, in my opinion. Very clear, very musical, very useful.

    The books is new, so not many people on here know and recommend it, but I wouldn't be surprised if it became a favorite. I'm not really a beginner anymore, but I think I'll pick it up because I'm sure there's lots of useful stuff in there.

    The Guitarist's Introduction to Jazz by Randy Vincent | Sher Music Co.

  15. #14

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    In retrospect after banging my head on all the wrong doors I would recommend:

    Mick Goodrick The Advancing Guitarist. A very large percentage of what you need is in the first 25 or so pages. It's abstract but if you actually do what he says and ponder it I think you'd be pretty powerful.

    Joe Viola Vol I and II saxophone technique combined with figuring out how the CAGED system works. Pick one key and stick with it for all the scales and arpegios and then move on.

    18 with Lee K. | DO THE M@TH

    learn a bunch of Lester Young solos, either transcribing or from these transcriptions

    Learn a lot of tunes.

    I started with the Leavitt book and ultimately it didn't really serve me very well. I think the problem is that with these books where everything is written out, it takes away the essential work of finding things on the fingerboard. So these DIY books like Goodrich where he shows you what you need to do and then you do it are far superior.

    That's what I've been thinking lately (and what I'm working on). I wish I'd figured it out earlier.

    Then again perhaps all the stuff I've done before got me to being able to understand this all now.

    Definitely learn a lot of tunes though.

  16. #15

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    Good choices.

    My suggestion is to be sure to get the 3-volumes-in-one edition (or all three editions). The third volume has some very important pages on shifting from one position to another. After you've got a good handle on Leavitt's 5 basic scale fingerings, you might want to take a peek at that section, then return to the normal path of learning.

  17. #16

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    Things could become too complicated. Leavitt fills me with dread, so I always recommend Jane Miller’s book, published by Berklee. It is all practical and straightforward. This being the 21st century, the sound files can be downloaded: you don’t need a CD player.

    I also like Corey Christiansen and Tamara Danielson’s Essential Jazz Lines in the Style of ’Cannonball’ Adderley. It is full of good ideas that are easy to apply. With both books, you find yourself playing jazz before you know it.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick View Post

    I also like Corey Christiansen and Tamara Danielson’s Essential Jazz Lines in the Style of ’Cannonball’ Adderley. It is full of good ideas that are easy to apply.
    Yeah, and "...in The Style Of Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, John Coltrane", too

  19. #18

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    I spent a lot of time with Leavitt's book. I think I got through about 2/5ths of the combined book. I really didn't learn all that much. I know the remainder is probably all the good stuff but for me in retrospect it doesn't seem to be all that great for understanding the guitar, or jazz. It has some basic reading stuff that was helpful.

    It's always hard to reverse engineer your own progress and see what would have helped you more in the past, but I don't think going backwards the Leavitt book really gave me all that much good stuff.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by dingusmingus View Post
    my eye was caught recently by "The Guitarist's introduction to Jazz" by Randy Vincent..
    I'm only a few pages in to this book and have already learned a few valuable things. The book starts with shell voicings and he has you doing, essentially, the same exercise as the beginning of the mickey Baker book. Play a certain sequence of chords up and down the neck. I've found this book just the right amount of challenging while still allowing small victories as long as you persist. I'd highly recommend checking this one out.

  21. #20

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    I found this thread while looking for a jazz guitar for beginners book, and I've seen your suggestions to the original poster.

    I've already bought The Guitarist's Introduction to Jazz, by Randy Vincent, and I'm working on the initial chapters about chord voicings and progressions. I'm liking it, although it's a bit dense for my level. However, the later chapters, which focus on melodic improvisation, are notation-only, which makes it very hard for me.

    I was wondering if Garrison Fewell's book is notation-only, too?

    Thanks,
    PRF

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRF View Post
    I found this thread while looking for a jazz guitar for beginners book, and I've seen your suggestions to the original poster.

    I've already bought The Guitarist's Introduction to Jazz, by Randy Vincent, and I'm working on the initial chapters about chord voicings and progressions. I'm liking it, although it's a bit dense for my level. However, the later chapters, which focus on melodic improvisation, are notation-only, which makes it very hard for me.

    I was wondering if Garrison Fewell's book is notation-only, too?

    Thanks,
    PRF
    No - it comes with TAB plus recordings of the examples. The TAB gives you suggested fingerings and although he doesn't mention it always it's best to check different fingerings as well.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    No - it comes with TAB plus recordings of the examples. The TAB gives you suggested fingerings and although he doesn't mention it always it's best to check different fingerings as well.
    Thank you! I have no problem transposing and finding different fingerings. In that case, I'll add the book to my shortlist.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRF View Post
    Thank you! I have no problem transposing and finding different fingerings. In that case, I'll add the book to my shortlist.
    I don't think you will be disappointed...the real learning comes when you apply the concepts to tunes you like; though you may certainly like the tunes specifically addressed in the book. Among them....So What, Autumn Leaves, Blue Bossa, Blues
    "6 strings this way and 12 frets that way and a world of mystery in between" Keith Richards on the guitar

  25. #24

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    already enjoying this two, thank you all for the tips

    Book Recommendations for a Beginning Jazz Guitarist-img_1707-jpg

  26. #25

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    A few folks have already mentioned Randy Vincent’s new book, ‘The Guitarist’s Introduction to Jazz’.

    I wholeheartedly agree - I think it may become a new standard resource akin to Leavitt’s method books.

    Anyone who works through it would be very well set up to play and to continue to learn in whatever targeted way they want.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Jazz Guitar Online is not just a forum, it's instructional material and lots more.
    The Chord Dictionary is especially helpful, and free.