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  1. #1

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    Found this in the forum and thought it was a good read worth sharing. As a novice I appreciate the stripped down and focused approach detailed in the article. But I wanted to get some perspectives from some of the more seasoned players that might hang out here too.

    Learn Jazz Guitar: How to Get Started Now! | The Strugglin' Guitarist

    Any constructive criticism or glaring issues? Seems like a good article.

    Thanks!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Just another article written by a self proclaimed novice about what he thinks is the best way to wade through all the available jazz bullshit and find success. Maybe it's good advice or maybe his personal observations just add to the infinite time wasting bullshit published by jazz novices on the interwebs....

  4. #3
    Thanks for your input. Are there any topics listed in the article you disagree with?

  5. #4

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    The article is fine for what it is. A lot of it is common sense advice. Learning jazz guitar isn’t always a linear journey. It’s very easy to wander down pathways that are not appropriate for your level of expertise or that won’t reward you with anything meaningful in the long term.
    In the world of the internet there’s so many you tube videos from people telling you to do this or that, but of course none of this advice is specific for what you may need. It’s possible you’ll find inspiration as often as you’ll find frustration and disappointment.
    Going it alone and learning songs and googling chord progressions will get you a few steps forward but it definitely has built in limitations.
    If a student is serious he needs to find not just a teacher but a mentor, someone who can steer the student around potholes and toward the most rewarding avenues for success. Lastly, there’s no finish line. There’s no point where you feel you’ve arrived. This is one of those life long endeavors.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesrohr1 View Post
    Found this in the forum and thought it was a good read worth sharing. As a novice I appreciate the stripped down and focused approach detailed in the article. But I wanted to get some perspectives from some of the more seasoned players that might hang out here too.

    Learn Jazz Guitar: How to Get Started Now! | The Strugglin' Guitarist

    Any constructive criticism or glaring issues? Seems like a good article.

    Thanks!
    I thought it was quite good actually. It's what a lot of people go through, no question. I was waiting for the inevitable 'Send $50 to get my course' but it didn't come which was a pleasant surprise.

    So, sure, not bad. But there's still the guitar to learn...

  7. #6

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    The article made me laugh. I pity the beginner who posts a perfectly reasonable question here.

    Seems like solid advice to me.

  8. #7

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    For me learning Jazz (now in the 3rd year) is like a big puzzle, it often lets one lose the overview but the times when pieces fit make you proud and go on and on.
    It is sure a neverending puzzle, but at time one finds the corner one likes and works on them further.
    The videos of Jens Larsen are a big help for me as listening and learning the tunes and of course the topics in this forum.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Just another article written by a self proclaimed novice about what he thinks is the best way to wade through all the available jazz bullshit and find success. Maybe it's good advice or maybe his personal observations just add to the infinite time wasting bullshit published by jazz novices on the interwebs....
    Now you've got me rethinking whether or not I should have clicked the "like" button.

    But, I checked out the site, and I am sure you have heard of relationships being based on shared misery and lament. This site offers some of that, along with the person's personal experience. For us guys who never made it "over the fence" with being a "real" Jazz musician, it can be entertaining and dare I say, soothing.

    But I do agree, these kinds of flights of fantasy can be a waste of time - unless you are able to sift through the info and have it aid in your decisions.

    (Ha! ha!, I started to begin this response with the question, "How do you really feel about it." Ha! ha. You always have a way of making my day, Gumbo!)

  10. #9

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    This article probably helped the writer (in a 'misery loves company' sorta way) more than it helped any reader. A list of "all the ways to confuse yourself about jazz by reading the Interwebs" is not the same as a well-organized pedagogy. To be clear, there are many good points scattered through the article. But that's just it: they are scattered, and the article itself is scattered. As a beginner, you need well-organized guidance from a pro, not an echo chamber full of other newbs.

    The fastest way from "can't play jazz" to "can play jazz" is study with a good teacher, and to really apply yourself. A great teacher is not a magic pill. You still have to learn to do what he or she shows you. And that takes daily practice, going slow, making yourself do it right, in order to build the skill necessary to approach the next challenge.

    If paying for private study is not within your means, then virtually any book by any well-known player is better than 90 percent of the stuff on the Web. The other ten percent is really great stuff like you'll find on Steve Khan's site or some of those interesting Adam Neely vids that have surfaced on another jazzguitar.be thread recently, the "Things I've Learned From Barry Harris" freebie vids on youtube, and so on. Hell, even Larry Carlton and Robben Ford are posting free lesson vids. Yeah, they are teasers to sell you their courses, but consider that twenty years ago it was pretty much impossible to take a lesson with Larry unless you knew someone who could do you a REALLY big favor. Thus, the Web has given us more chaff to sort through, but more grains of wheat to find too!

    So seek out a teacher who knows what they're doing, and get enough basic skills together to be able to get a toehold in the simpler stuff in Real Book I. Then just keep at it.

    Really gotta have it for free? Dirk posts a lot of free stuff on this very site. And hanging out at jam sessions with other players is great for your playing on many levels that include both "misery with other noobs" and awestruck admiration of players who are much further down the road than you are. Often, those players are very cool about sharing their knowledge.

    But this article, meh.

    My $0.02; if you disagree, that's cool.

    Good luck to the OP!

    SJ

    UPDATE: funny, the same guy actually wrote an article that I like: 14 Things Every Beginner Guitarist Should Do | The Strugglin' Guitarist
    Last edited by starjasmine; 09-16-2019 at 10:35 PM.

  11. #10

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    The problem with the internet is there’s too much information.

    You need a guide to show you the way.

    Someone who can give you advice about your playing.

  12. #11

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    I like the article and I can relate. After going down many rabbit holes here is what I would distill it down to.

    Learn some jazz chord voicings. Below is a sheet of very useful chord forms...learn these chord grips and pick and one or two jazz standards you love. You will have to move around the grips depending on the key. Memorize the chord progressions. Learn how to play the melodies of the songs in multiple positions on your fingerboard. Since you can obtain leads sheets of many standards on the internet for free knowing how to read standard notation will give you everything you need to know..the chords and the melody.Then the next type of chord you should learn are called drop 2 voicings. A very good book on this subject is called "Drop 2 Chord Voicings for Jazz and Modern Guitar" by Joseph Alexander. Drop 2 voicings give you option to play the same chord in different locations on the fingerboard.

    As you play through the song's chord progression you want to keep the successive chords as psychically close to each other as possible; sometimes even switching only a few notes to get to the next chord. (this is called voice leading). This is where knowing how to play the same chord in several places on the neck comes in handy.

    Oh yeah and listen to jazz


    jazz chord voicing chart.pdf

  13. #12
    Lots of good observations here. No less than three people have commented on the need to have a teacher. I really wish I didn’t live in such a rural area as there are no teachers here.

    There are also no gigs, jams, or even buddies to play with.

    Learning Jazz is tough, but I get the impression learning it in a vacuum is a lot tougher.

    Thanks again for the input!

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesrohr1 View Post
    I really wish I didn’t live in such a rural area as there are no teachers here.
    Have you considered taking lessons with a live teacher via Skype? It would not be quite as good as a f2f lesson for things like mechanical technique, but it would be great for interactive diagnosis and guidance about what to do next.

  15. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by starjasmine View Post
    Have you considered taking lessons with a live teacher via Skype? It would not be quite as good as a f2f lesson for things like mechanical technique, but it would be great for interactive diagnosis and guidance about what to do next.
    I have taken four Skype lessons. Unfortunately, I find Skype to be a poor medium for learning something as complex as Jazz guitar improv. Due to the lag, drops, and poor audio, it was almost impossible to really get on the same page as the teacher.

    Of course, I may also be a very poor student. :-)

    In general, I found Skype/Facetime lessons to be a bit of a bust, especially for what I was paying for some of them.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamesrohr1 View Post
    I have taken four Skype lessons. Unfortunately, I find Skype to be a poor medium for learning something as complex as Jazz guitar improv. Due to the lag, drops, and poor audio, it was almost impossible to really get on the same page as the teacher.

    Of course, I may also be a very poor student. :-)

    In general, I found Skype/Facetime lessons to be a bit of a bust, especially for what I was paying for some of them.
    yeah, I can relate. I'm in a semi-rural area, myself, and getting an internet connection that's robust enough to support video has been all but impossible till very recently.

    Oh, well, it was just a thought! You can always try posting questions and video here!

    As for the "poor student" part: don't be too hard on yourself. Jazz guitar is a challenging study, especially in the beginning. Everybody goes through a period (often lengthy) of feeling lost, overwhelmed, and a bit frustrated... just keep at it :-)

    SJ

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    The problem with the internet is there’s too much information.

    You need a guide to show you the way.

    Someone who can give you advice about your playing.
    You are so right. There is too much information. I remember reading about a guy who committed a crime so that he could go back to prison. Part of his reasoning was that on the outside, he had too many options.

    In the end, I agree with someone before who wrote that a person needs to be determined to put in the time, and must have the time to begin with, or they will never get there.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan View Post
    You are so right. There is too much information. I remember reading about a guy who committed a crime so that he could go back to prison. Part of his reasoning was that on the outside, he had too many options.

    In the end, I agree with someone before who wrote that a person needs to be determined to put in the time, and must have the time to begin with, or they will never get there.
    One would probably learn better with a guitar, s basic jazz chord book, a stack of records and a turntable in the middle of nowhere with no internet.

    At least to start....

    Actually make that one great record. Smoking at the Half Note or something. Using your ear... learning the tunes to start then some licks.

    No distractions.

  19. #18

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    Skype sucks. It really sucks. I quit using it long ago. I use Google Hangouts for video conferences, and it's acceptable. Bandwidth and lag issues are sometimes unavoidable, though, depending on the bandwidth available at any particular time, and that changes constantly. But Skype got the publicity after Microsoft acquired it, so that's what everyone seems to want to use, even though MS has let it wither on the vine.