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  1. #101

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  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Picking Etude No 1 :


    And in all the wonderful glory of making mistakes here is Etude. I had a brain fart or something. Not sure exactly what happened. I just went with it.
    Etude:

  4. #103

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    Good for you, I'm skipping that page. I've played it before and learned it well but it took some work. It's tricky, and I just don't like playing it with a pick, in the open position, on a 1 11/16" nut width guitar. I don't see much utility in it either, TBH. There are similar things to play on the classical guitar and I prefer them to this particular study. That's not much to complain about given the worthwhile lessons in the rest of the book.

    Onward and upward!

  5. #104

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  6. #105
    Leavitt introduces the key of G Major. It will be followed by F Major, A Minor and E Minor.

    I will try to keep a pace of one key per week.

  7. #106
    F Major

  8. #107
    Key of A Minor

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhui
    Here are mine clips.
    Doing good!

  10. #109

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    Well this one was fun. Cut time threw me for a bit. I kept wanting to hold the notes for their full 4/4/ time value. Talk about rewiring the circuits.

    Two, two guitar 1:


    Two, two guitar 2:


    Two, two duet:

  11. #110

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    Key of G Major :


    Rhythm Accompaniment 1 :


    Rhythm Accompaniment 2 :


    Rhythm Accompaniment 3 :

  12. #111

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    Pg 31 sixteenth notes exercise

  13. #112

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    Page 32 - Duet in G, plus another attempt at St. Thomas with timing still off.





    Leavitt Volume 1 - Jazz Song 1 - St Thomas - At 160 by Jazzstdnt | Free Listening on SoundCloud

  14. #113

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    Here is my shot on Duet in G. I have started to realize that I am just playing the pieces and not really taking in what they are trying to teach. So I have started to slow down. Studying the piece a bit more plus slowing down on the bpm. I am trying to count along with the piece as well. Tapping foot is ok but sometimes I will get lost in the count. So I am mouthing the count. Trying to add another part of the body into the mix so I know where I am in the measure.

    Duet in G : Guitar 1


    Duet in G : Guitar 2


    Duet in G

  15. #114

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    [QUOTE=Jazzstdnt;979645]Yeah, I struggle with time, and also struggle with playing legato. I redid page 32 Duet in G to address those shortcomings. I did a little bit better (maybe)./QUOTE]

    Both sound good to me. I know what it is like to be on the "not liking what I play" side. You know where the mistakes are and they are just blaring sounds of ugliness when you listen to them.

    Picking Etude No 2:

  16. #115

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    I really enjoyed this piece. Something about it just really clicked with me.

    Another Duet in G Guitar 1:


    Another Duet in G Guitar 2:


    Another Duet in G:

  17. #116

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    Way behind.. here is my Excercise page 21 and duet No. 2:

    MMFG Vol 1 - Etude No. 2 (duet) by Jhu | Free Listening on SoundCloud

  18. #117

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    Hey all, I'm a bit new to the game. I've already dabbled with part 1 of this book around a year ago, but am really grateful for the opportunity to learn it in a more structured way. I'll be doing 2 of the defined weeks here per week (the current one, and one that I missed). Here are my recordings for week 1's lessons:



    P. 4 Exercise 1 - 29.09.19, 16.02 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 5 Exercise 2 - 29.09.19, 16.02 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 5 Exercise 3 - 29.09.19, 16.03 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 5 Exercise 4 - 29.09.19, 16.03 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    https://soundcloud.com/sam-phillips-...-duet-29-09-19

    https://soundcloud.com/sam-phillips-...29-09-19-16-03

    https://soundcloud.com/sam-phillips-...29-09-19-16-03

    Sorry for the background noise, and some feedback on lower notes!

    I have to say, I've been playing guitar over 15 years, and have some basic familiarity with the first lessons of this book, so I thought this week would be a walk in the park. Actually playing the lessons wasn't really difficult, but I did observe some things. This my first time recording myself, and it was a bit shocking. I attack notes way too hard (though the 'harshness' may be in part because I'm recording from a laptop beside my guitar, while the amp itself is a few meters away, so the sound of the pick is relatively loud compared to the amp output in the recording). Also, playing the duet parts in sync proved a bit of a challenge!

    Will upload the most recent week (Key of F) now.

  19. #118

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    As I just posted in week 1, I'm doing two 'weeks' per week, the current one and a catch up. As I mentioned there, this is my first time really recording my playing, and I notice some things. In particular, my attack is way too strong and the duet got out of sync at times. That'll give me something to work on in the coming weeks! I think I'll try to be more consistent about practicing with a metronome, and make multiple recordings throughout the week instead of just recording at the end of the week. I found playing with the recording going somehow was much more difficult than without.

    Sorry for background noise and feedback on low notes. I also stupidly recorded the metronome in some of the tracks.



    P. 35 Rhythm Accompaniment - 29.09.19, 16.04 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 36 Duet In F - 29.09.19, 16.04 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 37 The Triplet - 29.09.19, 16.04 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

    P. 38 Waltz In F (solo) - 29.09.19, 16.04 by Sam Phillips | Free Listening on SoundCloud

  20. #119

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    Key of F major in first position:

  21. #120

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    Here are the two rhythm accompaniment exercises.

    Exercise 1:


    Exercise 2:

  22. #121

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    Duet in F Guitar 1:


    Duet in F Guitar 2:


    Duet in F:

  23. #122

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    The triplet exercise:

  24. #123

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    Hey guys, I had a question about the Waltz in F (solo). If you look at the 2nd measure (1st actual measure?) it's a F(Dotted Half Note), A(Dotted Half Note), C Quarter note. So the F & A should ring out 3 beats for the full measure. However, the second beat gets another A Quarter note. Does this cancel out the A from ringing out on the 3rd beat? Why didn't they do a F(Dotted Half Note), A Quarter Note, & C Quarter Note?

  25. #124

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    I have not looked at it that closely in a long time. The way it's written makes the melody line stand as a "voice" on its own (stems up), and the the lower notes as lower "voices" (stems down). As such, there is some independence in the way that duration/note value is marked. And to answer your question - the A note sounds for all 3 beats.The point about independent voices has additional implications too. It indicates that they can/should be played with some independence/individual distinction. It's all played by a solo guitar of course, but you could have two guitarists play it if you really wanted to.
    Last edited by Jazzstdnt; 10-11-2019 at 12:14 PM.

  26. #125

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    This piece is kicking my butt My fingers are getting tangled up. I have a brain disconnect when going from measure 13 to 14, this is not counting the anacrusis. The Bb-D-F in 13 to the Bb-C-E in 14 is murder for me. I can not get my fingers to work right. LOL. I keep moving the wrong fingers. Grrrrrr.

  27. #126

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    Second attempt at The Triplet - page 37 - this time without repeats.

    I'll have to come back with The Waltz, still not liking it.

    Cheers.

    Last edited by Jazzstdnt; 10-15-2019 at 06:56 PM.

  28. #127

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    Howdy D3MONC, sounds nice and clear.

    On that picking Etude it is intended that you let both the upper and lower notes ring for a full beat. The bidirectional stems indicate voice independence. This study is not unlike a lot of elementary classical guitar pieces, which Leavitt seemed to value. You may want to give it another try, up to you.

    EDIT: I put mine in the other thread by mistake so will post it here. Also, I just noticed that it has instructions about this under the first line, and over the fourth line (about holding the notes).

    Cheers.


  29. #128

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt
    Howdy D3MONC, sounds nice and clear.

    On that picking Etude it is intended that you let both the upper and lower notes ring for a full beat. The bidirectional stems indicate voice independence. This study is not unlike a lot of elementary classical guitar pieces, which Leavitt seemed to value. You may want to give it another try, up to you.

    EDIT: I put mine in the other thread by mistake so will post it here. Also, I just noticed that it has instructions about this under the first line, and over the fourth line (about holding the notes).

    Cheers.

    Thanks for the feedback. I'll definitely go back and clean it up in the future. I'm trying to keep moving forward for now as I feel like I'm really behind. I took the note "hold down top note" to mean only hold the C during that section. I'm a little confused by your reply. Are you suggesting that both the high and low note be held, the notes shown as eighth notes are actually intended to be held for quarter note values, or just I'm moving my fretting fingers to fast instead of holding them out for a full eight note?

    EDIT: Damn yours is very fast & clean. I definitely need to get better lol.

  30. #129

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    Quote Originally Posted by D3MONC
    Thanks for the feedback. I'll definitely go back and clean it up in the future. I'm trying to keep moving forward for now as I feel like I'm really behind. I took the note "hold down top note" to mean only hold the C during that section. I'm a little confused by your reply. Are you suggesting that both the high and low note be held, the notes shown as eighth notes are actually intended to be held for quarter note values, or just I'm moving my fretting fingers to fast instead of holding them out for a full eight note?

    EDIT: Damn yours is very fast & clean. I definitely need to get better lol.
    Yes hold both the top line and bass line notes, without clipping them off like eighth notes. The bass line notes are to be played like quarter notes that start on the beat, and the top notes like tied eighth notes that extend until the next eighth note is struck on the off beat.

    I'll provide a few classical examples later tonight, although some of them move out of the pattern pretty quickly. (The pattern being a moving bass voice with a steady upper voice (pedal point?) that is).

    Giuliani Allegro in A-Minor does it 5 times.




    Sor studies, Estudio #4, Segovia edition. The top line has double stops as opposed to a single note.




    Finally, this has some more, but the top line moves a lot too. You get the idea. Carcassi Etude 17

    Last edited by Jazzstdnt; 10-16-2019 at 09:19 PM.

  31. #130

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    Well here is my Waltz in F. More like a drunk stumble in the woods only to come out on the other end not smelling like a rose. But oh well. I will come back to this piece. I will not let it get me down. Here it is big ole warts in all its glory.


  32. #131

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    Here's my Waltz in F.


  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by georgebanketas
    Well here is my Waltz in F. More like a drunk stumble in the woods only to come out on the other end not smelling like a rose. But oh well. I will come back to this piece. I will not let it get me down. Here it is big ole warts in all its glory.


    I think you did just fine George. When a slight error was made you kept going, which is one of those "live performance 101" kind of things, survival mode and all that. Well done!

  34. #133

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    One thing for us to consider is the following:

    1. The standard approach for private lessons is a quarter or semester of study, with a recital and/or a semester test at the end (3-4 months total duration).
    2. The recital is where the student is supposed to nail it - or do their very best to nail it.
    3. In weekly lessons the student does their best for the teacher, but of course it's in private and mistakes are made.

    But what we're doing is uploading recordings of our weekly "lessons" to the internet. That is a different ballgame altogether, especially for students/amatuers/hobbyists. There is pressure to perform at the recital level because it's not in private and there is a kind of permanence to the whole thing.

    So, what we could do is:
    (1) Upload "weekly lesson versions", with the typical mistakes and flubs.
    (2) At the halfway and end points of the book upload "recital versions".

    Recitals would include both "technique" and "repertoire", or simply repertoire. In the case of this book the Solos and Etudes are good choices for repertoire. Each player would choose 1-3 selections for their "recital", and in the recital would do our best to "nail it".

    Would welcome your thoughts, cheers!

  35. #134
    I can’t say I feel pressure to nail the exercises, etude and solo piexpces.
    It is true though, that I try to upload them only when I have recorded them right ( or almost right).
    That takes a lot of time, but it is also what makes me keep practicing.



    Inviato dal mio iPad utilizzando Tapatalk

  36. #135

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    I hear ya. My suggestion would likely get one through the book faster, but you never know.

    Whatever keeps one motivated is the best thing.

    Cheers.

  37. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt
    One thing for us to consider is the following:

    1. The standard approach for private lessons is a quarter or semester of study, with a recital and/or a semester test at the end (3-4 months total duration).
    2. The recital is where the student is supposed to nail it - or do their very best to nail it.
    3. In weekly lessons the student does their best for the teacher, but of course it's in private and mistakes are made.

    But what we're doing is uploading recordings of our weekly "lessons" to the internet. That is a different ballgame altogether, especially for students/amatuers/hobbyists. There is pressure to perform at the recital level because it's not in private and there is a kind of permanence to the whole thing.

    So, what we could do is:
    (1) Upload "weekly lesson versions", with the typical mistakes and flubs.
    (2) At the halfway and end points of the book upload "recital versions".

    Recitals would include both "technique" and "repertoire", or simply repertoire. In the case of this book the Solos and Etudes are good choices for repertoire. Each player would choose 1-3 selections for their "recital", and in the recital would do our best to "nail it".

    Would welcome your thoughts, cheers!
    I've always looked at it the way that you described. I.E. our submissions are more of our weekly "lessons" in a public online fashion. I still try to do as good as I can but, I try not to get hung up on perfection. I move along so I'm not too far behind the timeline we've set. I think this also helps me stay more accountable in terms of actually practicing the material. I don't think "recital versions" is a bad suggestion either though. I'd think of that as more of a supplement to going through the material. I know that if that was all we did I'd only work on those pieces. I'm just not disciplined enough personally to follow the rest of the material.

  38. #137

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    Hey guys, for "Pretty Pickin' (duet)" are we suposed to do something with the "Chord Preparation"? Is that supposed to be a backing track looping behind the duet or something? Also, could someone explain the Al Coda, D.C. Al Coda, & Coda. I'm a little confused on which sections I go back and which sections I go back to. Thanks guys!
    Last edited by D3MONC; 10-22-2019 at 02:46 PM.

  39. #138

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    Sure.

    The chord preparation is just to help you familiarize yourself with the chords before tackling them head on as broken chords/arpeggios. That's not a bad idea, it helps with classical guitar too. That said, I don't recall ever playing through it, although I may have once. Play it if you want to/if it helps, or skip it if you want to.

    Regarding the coda stuff:
    Play all the way to the end of the 6th line (next to last line) (D.C. al coda),
    Go back to the top, then play to half way through the 4th line (al coda),
    Then jump to the 7th and final line (Coda)

    Slightly translated that means - play through the measures until you're told to go back to the "head" ("Da Capo" in Italian, or D.C.), from where you will play until you see a sign that tells you to jump to the coda. The Coda is the last line.
    Last edited by Jazzstdnt; 10-22-2019 at 11:54 PM.

  40. #139

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    A Minor Scales

  41. #140

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    A Minor Rhythm Accompaniment

  42. #141

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    Sounds nice and clear George. One small point - the first chord has an "A" as its top note, 5th fret. You played G# on the 4th fret.

    So, the melody line on top of the first six chords descends by half step from the fifth fret down to the open string. A down to E in other words.

    Playing sounds good though.

  43. #142

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt
    Sounds nice and clear George. One small point - the first chord has an "A" as its top note, 5th fret. You played G# on the 4th fret.

    So, the melody line on top of the first six chords descends by half step from the fifth fret down to the open string. A down to E in other words.

    Playing sounds good though.
    My mind must have been wondering when I was playing this. I could have sworn my little finger was on the 5th fret. LOL. Thank you for pointing that out to me.

  44. #143

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    Yeah man.

    All, and I mean - ALL - of William Leavitt's chord studies are tough, in their own way.

    He really had a knack for that.

  45. #144

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    My rhythm accompaniment redo

  46. #145

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    I am currently using Leavitt's modern method for for guitar book 1. I have been trying to identify the chords used as a learning exercise. There is one so far that has me a bit stumped, that is in measure 7 of sea to sea duet. The notes of the triad are F, G and C. The chords up to this one I have figured out, this one I am not sure about. Can anyone explain this one to me?

  47. #146

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    I'll call measure 7 Csus4 and resolves to C in measure 8...?

  48. #147

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    I'll call measure 7 Csus4 and resolves to C in measure 8...?
    Thanks, I didn't get the Csus4, the C in measure 8 I picked up on since its just the root C that moved into the treble side. If you move that C down it makes a perfect stack. I think maybe I need to just focus on the exercise right now and not worry too much about the chords, although it is an interesting exercise sometimes just trying to identify things.