1. #1

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    If I would split my time into 33% learning chords (I have been playing for 6 months but haven't really had a good routine.. I know the basic ones on 6th stirng root and 5th string root but I wanna learn 4th string root and also the inversions) 33% ear training and 33% sightreading. Also maybe after the practice I will just play other stuff for fun. Thanks for any replies...

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Combine all of that with learning tunes and you're on the right track. Chords in a vacuum are much harder to remember than chords in context of a song.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    If I would split my time into 33% learning chords (I have been playing for 6 months but haven't really had a good routine.. I know the basic ones on 6th stirng root and 5th string root but I wanna learn 4th string root and also the inversions) 33% ear training and 33% sightreading. Also maybe after the practice I will just play other stuff for fun. Thanks for any replies...
    Perfectly reasonable. Both the sightreading and ear training should involve actual songs, not just exercises. That way, you can develop repertoire and fluency on single note lines. You may find it easier to learn chords in the context of songs as well. That way, you'll start thinking about how to connect the chords into progressions with good voice leading.

  5. #4

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  6. #5

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    50% playing tunes divide the rest of the time into the other 50% would be my recommendation.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  7. #6

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    You are very fortunate to be thinking about these things as a beginner;
    you may avoid years of unproductive or counter productive digressions.

    Learn tunes - the ones you want to play fully contain everything you need to know to play them.
    Figure them out by ear - comprehensive approach forming the foundation for everything in Jazz.
    "Bent my ear to hear the tune and closed my eyes to see."

  8. #7

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    It sounds like a good place to begin. Stay flexible yet true to your goal, in other words, let your practice routine evolve as your idea of what you need is informed by real music. I don't know your background, but reading people's opinions on a forum will take you places but not necessarily where your own tendencies as a player might bring you.
    How does one find out who they are as a musician and what they are as a player?
    See as much live music and learn to listen to really good recordings. Maybe you don't consider this a part of practicing or a practicing routine but make it a part of your regular diet of learning to be an informed musician. For all the time you spend on your fundamental skills, spend regular and dedicated time honing your awareness, feel, spacial, dynamic, pacing and vocabulary skills by immersing yourself in the music that is being made in real time.
    Find someone you can buddy up with and play with them on a regular basis. It will make everything you do in your "practice" time real. It will show up the skills you need to work on and why.
    Keep it real and good luck
    David

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    If I would split my time into 33% learning chords ... & inversions
    Cool if you do that in some good context. Best and most important is tunes of course. Second best is common progressions. Third best is to invent nice sounding progressions yourself. Fourth best (getting worse actually) is going through a bunch of them, like the classical piano routines go. Since jazz needs a lot of them 7th chords, all of those are not usable (inversions) in real playing because of the sound or technical issues anyway. Good to know, but they don't need to steal too much time like that.

    Learning chords in jazz doesn't mean you need to know 1000 chords and inversions. For start, you may get away with 30ish maybe but the real work is to learn to connect them well with all other stuff. Like 'your chord' --> another chord(s), --> scale, -->melody, -->walking bass, -->your one-line impro.. You know, all that stuff... and then there be the substitutions

    But the point is, connecting&using them should be the main practice, not just memorizing. Seems a lot of work but actually they stick with you much faster this way.