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  1. #1

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    I wonder how much theory I need to know before learning jazz theory. How many chords (and which), scales and stuff.
    Is that playlist enough theory so that I will be ready for jazz? Thanks for any tips.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    How much theory do you know already? Do you know how the major scale is constructed, the basic minor scales, triads, the basic 7th chords, the cycle of fifths, the concepts of harmonized scales and chord inversions, a basic ability to read sheet music and to find the notes on a piano? That’s the kind of stuff to start with. I think the video you posted assumes you already know much of that.

    Start with simple tunes in major keys. Once you are comfortable with the theory in those tunes you can move toward more difficult music.
    Last edited by KirkP; 02-18-2019 at 06:26 PM.

  4. #3

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    Before getting into jazz you should learn several hundred chords along with about 10 scales, along with memorization of the charts of about 300 tunes.

    Just kidding.

    Seriously, learn as you go. Long journey begin with first step.
    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  5. #4

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    There are people who can play great jazz and do not know any theory.

    That's worth remembering, even though those people are rare.

    Most "jazz theory" books seem to begin with basic music theory.

    Probably the only thing you really need is to be able to read standard notation and find the notes on the guitar. Maybe not even that. But, since most theory books give examples in standard notation, it helps. It would be even better to be able to play the stuff on piano.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbler View Post

    Seriously, learn as you go. Long journey begin with first step.

    ^ This...^
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  7. #6
    Right now I know how to read some sheet music (not the octaves though). I know how to play major scale and minor pentatonic scales om guitar(only the first position though). I know how to play the mist basic minor and major chords, some 7th chords and some suspended chords. I reserved a book called ”The Jazz Theory Book” since it has been reccomended alot here from the library 2 days Aho so it should code today are tommorow. I also reserved a book called ”The Advancing Guitarist”. So it Will be interesting to read these Books. What I want to learn (I know it takes time) is to have better technique (be able to play faster and have better finger coordination) Play harder stuff faster from tabs and sheets (This is part of technique since I need to learn how to play faster), a lot of chords (jazzy chords????) and some scales in all positions and not just one.

  8. #7

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    If you make sure to focus on tunes and the application of theory on those, then you will in fact "learn as you go". As someone who have made sure to take all the wrong roads before finally finding the right one, I've learned that focusing on theory is putting the cart before the horse. Not that it isn't important, it very much is. But it is important as a tool for playing well over tunes, not in itself.

    Learn a tune you like. Do you understand how the chords relate to each other, how they imply keys and that those keys might/will change over the course of the form, how the notes of the melody relate to the chords, etc? If not, then that's where theory comes in - learn the tune then learn the workings of it.
    Likewise, is there some soloists take on it you particularly love? What is he/she doing over the changes, hw does it relate to the melody, and so on. Again, theory is important as a road to understanding.

    Focus at least as much on time as on scales and harmony. It's not an either/or, but a bum note played in time tend to sound better than a cool run with bad phrasing. There's another thing I wish I'd learned early on
    Last edited by Average Joe; 02-19-2019 at 04:55 AM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    Is that playlist enough theory so that I will be ready for jazz? Thanks for any tips.
    What playlist? You didn't post one. Was I supposed to watch a half hour video to find out?

    You should watch this video and then ask.

  10. #9
    Sorry I did something bad with the link. All my Music Lessons (in chronological order) - YouTube There is the playlist. I have not listended too that many jazz artists. I have listened to East Coast Love Afair by Kurt Rosenwinkel and I like it. Sure I Will watch that 2 house video (I am not benig sarcastic).

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    Play harder stuff faster from tabs and sheets (This is part of technique since I need to learn how to play faster), a lot of chords (jazzy chords????) and some scales in all positions and not just one.
    Also lose the tabs. Especially since you can already read some.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    I wonder how much theory I need to know before learning jazz theory. How many chords (and which), scales and stuff.
    Is that playlist enough theory so that I will be ready for jazz? Thanks for any tips.
    Less than you might think.

    You need to be able to map the fretboard, which is not really theory, but may seem that way - so intervals and so on.

    You need to be able to construct common chords and scales, again a lot of this will seem unfamiliar for most non-jazz players.

    Probably some people have given some lists of material on this thread, I won't add to it.

    After that, analysis: know what the chords of the song are, and see what notes your favourite players use over those chords, by ear.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    I wonder how much theory I need to know before learning jazz theory. How many chords (and which), scales and stuff.
    Is that playlist enough theory so that I will be ready for jazz? Thanks for any tips.
    OK..think of "music theory" as a very big meal..that you have to eat very slowly..chew for a long time and digest fully..

    start with the very basic major scale (C scale is recommended !) and learn what chords( begin with triads !) are embedded in it..this is the major scale "harmonized" .. learn how to play those chords once you feel comfortable with that study..learn how to make "four note chords" out of the triads ..these are known as 7th chords and are the main basis for jazz harmony..go very slow with this and study it carefully as it is the foundation of all else to follow..

    I suggest a tune "On Green Dolphin Street" in C major..it is a standard in jazz and not difficult..
    listen to it from various artists and instruments..get the sheet music for it and follow the melody and chords..hum along with it or "scat sing" it..then sing it while looking at the sheet music..then sing it without the sheet music..then try and play it .. start slow..study the chord movement and the melody..record all this if possible and use it as a "progress" guide..

    for me..learning theory is a life long study as it is a story like reason why music behaves as it does in harmonic and melodic ways..and there are always new discoveries in this study

    the basic triads from the harmonized major scale and their inversions and voicing placement open a vast array of different sounds..and with the four note chords and their inversions the possibilities are countless..
    it takes time, dedication, and alot of patients to get this stuff under your fingers


    now..with all that said...you can learn the songs and chords with out learning any theory at all and still be able to play "jazz" there were and are some top players that know just a little theory..enough to communicate with other musicians..chord names and musical terms etc but dont know the why of it and dont care about that aspect. so there is that...

    hope this helps
    play well ...
    wolf

  14. #13

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    When jazz looks complex, it's usually because we don't see the actual simple explanation, e.g. some complicated chord that is really just two chords played together like a G7 and an E major triad on top of that.

    Read the jazz theory book you mentioned. Don't read Advancing Guitarist for a few years- it's not aimed at people just starting jazz.
    Beauty is as close to terror as we can well endure. -Rainer Maria Rilke

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by wolflen View Post
    it takes time, dedication, and alot of patients to get this stuff under your fingers

    ...says Dr.Jazz....





    (sorry but this was too good to resist....)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  16. #15

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  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara View Post
    When jazz looks complex, it's usually because we don't see the actual simple explanation, e.g. some complicated chord that is really just two chords played together like a G7 and an E major triad on top of that.

    Read the jazz theory book you mentioned. Don't read Advancing Guitarist for a few years- it's not aimed at people just starting jazz.
    I checked the book. It seende ok for me. I want to be bettet at guitar as Well.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    What playlist? You didn't post one. Was I supposed to watch a half hour video to find out?

    You should watch this video and then ask.
    jeez, what did the kid do to deserve this?

    5 minutes in and GB already sorts the modes from bright to dark, lol. how is that going to help a 13 year old kid with learning how to play?

    OP: do get a teacher. are there pros in your area? if you understand german i'll be happy to send you an 9 page manuscript that shows you the basics of harmony in a jazz context.

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by djg View Post
    jeez, what did the kid do to deserve this?

    5 minutes in and GB already sorts the modes from bright to dark, lol. how is that going to help a 13 year old kid with learning how to play?

    OP: do get a teacher. are there pros in your area? if you understand german i'll be happy to send you an 9 page manuscript that shows you the basics of harmony in a jazz context.
    I watched the beggining but didnt understand so I closed the vid. Also I dont understand Deutsch. I dont think there are any jazz teachers here. Maybe teachers that teach open chords..

  20. #19

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    I'd say concentrate on the musical facts first

    But seriously...learn as you go...ALWAYS BE LEARNING SONGS.

    And as you go, the basics that are completely undeniably liberating. Know the fretboard. Know how to construct chords--what notes are IN the chords, not just shapes. Definitely know the major scales, definitely know arpeggios for the chords you learn. Every time you learn a new chord, learn an arpeggio for it.

    I think you said in another post you've been playing a bit over a month...so really, one of the best things you could be learning right now is how to make a good sound with your instrument. How to press down a note only hard enough. How to play with dynamics. Simple melodies, make them as beautiful as you can.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  21. #20

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    gumbo's such a troll lol

  22. #21

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    Not much at all ....

    learn the the major scale really well
    (in C probably first)
    and all the chords and arpeggios in it

    then learn some actual tunes

    This is the road map of lots of western music ....

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    gumbo's such a troll lol
    and i'm such easy prey, lol.

    -logging off

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    What playlist? You didn't post one. Was I supposed to watch a half hour video to find out?

    You should watch this video and then ask.
    What a great video. One of the best I've seen in a long time. My wife is going to be after me about data overages, but I could not stop watching this on my phone.

    I also personally love that he really gets at the way players "think " or don't think about scales , note choices etc. while playing. Talks about how Stan getz "knew" all of them by ear and that he did himself as well, even before he knew what they were called. Does at a lot on the idea of taking chord scale knowledge from conscious to subconscious thought and being able to freely improvise without thinking so much etc.

    So many forum threads devolve into this false "debate". Should sticky this video before getting into these huge debates about how players "think in modes" while improvising.

    Burton is of course a great player and is great in this teaching format as well.

  25. #24

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    Gary is accepted as one of the most important educators in the history of jazz. That's why I posted this video again, not to be a troll, but to enlighten, as always.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo View Post
    Gary is accepted as one of the most important educators in the history of jazz. That's why I posted this video again, not to be a troll, but to enlighten, as always.
    Interesting.

    Burton gets a gold star for making the playing of jazz appear as complicated and confusing as possible.

    A newb would be totally baffled and intimidated to even attempt to learn jazz by this video but experienced jazzers can benefit.

    I will get to work learning the 10-12 required scales so that I may instantaneously connect them to the chords passing by at intervals of every 1/2 second.


    Stan Getz is thrashed by Burton for playing by ear. Getz did not know the 10-12 required scales!
    Last edited by Drumbler; 02-24-2019 at 10:25 AM.
    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbler View Post
    Interesting.

    Burton gets a gold star for making the playing of jazz appear as complicated and confusing as possible.

    A newb would be totally baffled and intimidated to even attempt to learn jazz by this video but experienced jazzers can benefit.
    You're playing a dangerous game my friend. CST police are watching. A full out CST touch down has been slowly brewing in this thread. Don't do this. Like a wise man once said:
    They're out to get you, better leave while you can
    Don't want to be a boy, you want to be a man
    You want to stay alive, better do what you can
    So beat it, just beat it
    Last edited by Tal_175; 02-24-2019 at 06:12 PM.

  28. #27

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    I thought I must watch this... and saw it was 2 1/4 hours long! I shall watch it in increments. It's the only way.

  29. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbler View Post
    Interesting.

    Burton gets a gold star for making the playing of jazz appear as complicated and confusing as possible.

    A newb would be totally baffled and intimidated to even attempt to learn jazz by this video but experienced jazzers can benefit.

    I will get to work learning the 10-12 required scales so that I may instantaneously connect them to the chords passing by at intervals of every 1/2 second.


    Stan Getz is thrashed by Burton for playing by ear. Getz did not know the 10-12 required scales!
    Yeah. This is the takeaway of a lot of the YouTube comments as well. I didn't hear it as a put-down, more the opposite. Getz, like Burton early on, was hearing EVERYTHING "without labels". Burton describes learning the names as simply knowing what to call things he'd already learned from the music, like Getz and other great players.

    I don't think that the kind of listening (to what others are playing) that he's describing Getz doing is a crutch or something. More like what we all should be doing...

  30. #29

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    I think I’ve seen this video before, and it occurred to me that when he is effortlessly whizzing about on all those scales applied to a tune, maybe this is something that is easier to visualise and conceive (and play) on the vibes. The layout of the bars like a giant piano keyboard must facilitate this, certainly by comparison with the guitar.

  31. #30

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    There is a very telling moment in that video. Gary Burton is talking about a situation where you see F#-7b5 chord but you don't know what scale to play over that chord type (starts around 12:58 or so). He says well there is F# you can play that and listen may be you'll hear some other notes others play (the context is, you do this in the moment to save the day but then go home and learn it properly).
    So this seems to indicate that in CST approach when you see an F#-7b5 chord you either can shred Locrian #9 scale because you worked on that chord or you have zero clue as to what notes might be in that chord other than the root? How about a b5 or a min 3rd or a min7?
    I know it looks like I'm making a strawman argument. But I think this is a true philosophical difference between the CST approach vs "master playing around the chord tones first" approach. In CST something like F#-7b5 is seen more as a label for a scale or a set of possible scales rather than 3 defining intervals (b3, b3, 3). It's associated with certain scale sounds.
    Obviously Gary Burton or other people who use this approach understand what chords are as well as people who don't use CST. But the mental approach is to associate chords with scale sounds, instead of explicitly think of the defining chord tones they are made of.
    I'm not disagreeing with people who like this approach. I do think it is an interesting way of looking at things. I realize that I even think that way some times. It's sort of there in parallel with everything else. Although I do think it's a more advanced way of looking at things. It comes with some experience as a generalization (or abstraction) of chord tone based thinking. Therefore I have doubts about it being a "getting started" topic.

  32. #31

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    How much theory do I need before getting into jazz?-jazz-jpg

  33. #32

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    How much theory do I need before getting into jazz?-jazz-pi-3pg-jpg

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    I think I’ve seen this video before, and it occurred to me that when he is effortlessly whizzing about on all those scales applied to a tune, maybe this is something that is easier to visualise and conceive (and play) on the vibes. The layout of the bars like a giant piano keyboard must facilitate this, certainly by comparison with the guitar.
    That's what I thought about Stefon Harris.

  35. #34

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    I consider myself 'intermediate' (aren't we all in some sense?), not professional, so I'm not sure how you'd rate my opinion. I'd say spend 25-50% of your practice time on technique, scales, arpeggios, chords etc.. It's something you have to get down, and all the theory is in there once you have the sounds down. Spend the rest of your time having fun, learning tunes etc. I started learning tunes and transcribing some years back, without some strong fundamental technique and knowledge, and I wish I hadn't looking back.

  36. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    There is a very telling moment in that video. Gary Burton is talking about a situation where you see F#-7b5 chord but you don't know what scale to play over that chord type (starts around 12:58 or so). He says well there is F# you can play that and listen may be you'll hear some other notes others play (the context is, you do this in the moment to save the day but then go home and learn it properly).
    So this seems to indicate that in CST approach when you see an F#-7b5 chord you either can shred Locrian #9 scale because you worked on that chord or you have zero clue as to what notes might be in that chord other than the root? How about a b5 or a min 3rd or a min7?
    I know it looks like I'm making a strawman argument. But I think this is a true philosophical difference between the CST approach vs "master playing around the chord tones first" approach. In CST something like F#-7b5 is seen more as a label for a scale or a set of possible scales rather than 3 defining intervals (b3, b3, 3). It's associated with certain scale sounds.
    Obviously Gary Burton or other people who use this approach understand what chords are as well as people who don't use CST. But the mental approach is to associate chords with scale sounds, instead of explicitly think of the defining chord tones they are made of.
    I'm not disagreeing with people who like this approach. I do think it is an interesting way of looking at things. I realize that I even think that way some times. It's sort of there in parallel with everything else. Although I do think it's a more advanced way of looking at things. It comes with some experience as a generalization (or abstraction) of chord tone based thinking. Therefore I have doubts about it being a "getting started" topic.
    Yeah. I actually really liked that part.

    He actually keeps things much simpler than what you're describing though. His point throughout is basically that there aren't dozens and dozens of options for playing over that chord, (plain Locrian is probably his starting point I'd think. He never mentioned Locrian sharp 2) and regardless of how you go about it, you're going to arrive at that place. If you go home and practice "chord tones add the notes which sound good with them", you're going to end up with his more set anyway.

    You can try to reinvent the wheel or whatever, but the music has basic traditions.

    I never heard him say anything about NOT playing chord tones or not focusing on them, other than maybe mentioning that you also have to know what OTHER notes go with them. He did say a WHOLE LOT about working to get PAST the point of having to consciously think of pitch collections as quickly as possible. Everything he's talking about seems to me to be agreeing with basically BOTH sides of the "pure ear" versus "thinking in modes" "debate" that I always hear.

    I think we mostly think about all of these things the wrong way. Burton is an ear guy. Started that way and continues to talk about things basically that way while reconciling descriptions of things with the way I've heard players talk about things in describing pitch collections which others might describe as CST.

    Did anyone watch the entire video, like when he's talking to the horn player about some wrong notes etc? It's not an overly theoretical discussion. He's saying that you have to work out which notes sounds good one way or another, so that you can get PAST all of that and simply start making music.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Yeah. I actually really liked that part.

    He actually keeps things much simpler than what you're describing though. His point throughout is basically that there aren't dozens and dozens of options for playing over that chord, (plain Locrian is probably his starting point I'd think. He never mentioned Locrian sharp 2) and regardless of how you go about it, you're going to arrive at that place. If you go home and practice "chord tones add the notes which sound good with them", you're going to end up with his more set anyway.

    You can try to reinvent the wheel or whatever, but the music has basic traditions.

    I never heard him say anything about NOT playing chord tones or not focusing on them, other than maybe mentioning that you also have to know what OTHER notes go with them. He did say a WHOLE LOT about working to get PAST the point of having to consciously think of pitch collections as quickly as possible. Everything he's talking about seems to me to be agreeing with basically BOTH sides of the "pure ear" versus "thinking in modes" "debate" that I always hear.

    I think we mostly think about all of these things the wrong way. Burton is an ear guy. Started that way and continues to talk about things basically that way while reconciling descriptions of things with the way I've heard players talk about things in describing pitch collections which others might describe as CST.

    Did anyone watch the entire video, like when he's talking to the horn player about some wrong notes etc? It's not an overly theoretical discussion. He's saying that you have to work out which notes sounds good one way or another, so that you can get PAST all of that and simply start making music.
    I did latch on to his "ear playing" mentality (while using theory to answer the question "what did you play there?") and found this very interesting.

    So Burton played successfully and well by ear first and later learned all the theory and CST which allowed him to explain it?

    This is very interesting to me. The chicken or the egg. What came first?

    What Burton (and Getz) did was ear first, theory later (or not ever in the case Getz and scales?). Current jazz education is the opposite it appears to me. I've never been to Berkley so that is for others to comment about.

    I also found interesting his approach to ear training which was to play a corresponding scale (note collection) over a chord until it becomes recognized by the ear/brain. Example: Dorian played over iim chord. This sounds so obvious but most people don't practice this way, i.e. focusing on the way the scale and chord combination sounds.

    Per Burton, Getz played the same way (by ear), LISTENING to the other players, and harmonizing with them. How novel and radical!

    Getz actually listened to his fellow musicians while playing! Astounding.

    Unfortunately Getz never embraced CST and learned the names of the 10-12 magic scales. For shame, Mr. Getz!

    Stan was too busy getting high probably. Heroin is a bad drug.

    Did Burton become a jazz snob when he learned the note collections in the 10-12 required jazz scales?

    Now, what do we take away from this video?

    Well, use your ears is one thing. You can play good jazz without theory but you can't play good jazz without using your ears.
    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Did anyone watch the entire video, like when he's talking to the horn player about some wrong notes etc? It's not an overly theoretical discussion. He's saying that you have to work out which notes sounds good one way or another, so that you can get PAST all of that and simply start making music.
    I'm watching it bit by bit. So far my favorite part is where he develops a simple 4 note theme through one chorus of Green Dolphin St. (around 24:12). He plays a very convincing solo by transposing the theme to all the chords of the tune while creatively altering the rhythm and shape of the same simple theme and embellishing it. Makes me want to pick a theme and a tune and practice for hours applying the theme to the tune, see what I can come up with.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    I'm watching it bit by bit. So far my favorite part is where he develops a simple 4 note theme through one chorus of Green Dolphin St. (around 24:12). He plays a very convincing solo by transposing the theme to all the chords of the tune while creatively altering the rhythm and shape of the same simple theme and embellishing it. Makes me want to pick a theme and a tune and practice for hours applying the theme to the tune, see what I can come up with.
    I have a Jerry Bergonzi DVD where he demonstrates ideas like that, it’s surprising how effective it can be.

  40. #39

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    Teaching a starting jazz student CST is like a driving instructor explaining how the internal combustion engine works.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Teaching a starting jazz student CST is like a driving instructor explaining how the internal combustion engine works.
    Is this a poor idea because the mechanics of the internal combustion engine are too advanced an idea for beginners or because driving instructors are probably not the best resource to teach it in light of engineers being more qualified... or have I missed the point entirely?
    Jazz isn't dead. It just smells funny. FZ

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by SandChannel View Post
    Is this a poor idea because the mechanics of the internal combustion engine are too advanced an idea for beginners or because driving instructors are probably not the best resource to teach it in light of engineers being more qualified... or have I missed the point entirely?
    Yes to both, although more precisely, it's simply not relevant, not too advanced.

    The second point I hadn't considered, but it's a good one. The performing musician is more concerned with real world applications than deep theory. 'You can do this', 'here's a situation' 'try this' not so much 'this is how harmony works.'

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    I have a Jerry Bergonzi DVD where he demonstrates ideas like that, it’s surprising how effective it can be.
    Yeah I have his melodic structures book where he uses 1235 patterns as theme. Is that what he does on the DVD?

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tal_175 View Post
    Yeah I have his melodic structures book where he uses 1235 patterns as theme. Is that what he does on the DVD?
    It's a bit looser than that, he talks about using 'shapes' and 'sequences'. For example you just pick a pattern of notes going up and down, e.g. a pattern of 4 notes could be played 'up-up-down'. You can make the notes anything you like that works, there's no fixed rules. Then you play it all the way through the tune, varying the length of the notes, varying the rests, the rhythms, choosing different notes to suit the chords etc. The only rule is to maintain the shape i.e. 'up-up-down'. Later he adds approach notes and tags to the pattern, and so on. On the DVD Jerry plays the chords on the piano while his student plays the exercises on the sax. By the time he's through, it sounds like a proper solo.

  45. #44

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    Learning the major scale is very useful. The modes of the major then makes sense as they are just the major scale but from different starting positions. Understanding ii V I or 2 5 1 or whatever you want to call it is very useful. However don't put off just playing tunes and melodies. I spent far too long trying to understand jazz, and in fact I think it is much better to listen copy and play, then the theory can inform rather than drive the musical process.

  46. #45
    The real book came to the library today. Gonna get it at my lunchbreak.

  47. #46
    "How much theory" is only half of the question. The other half is "how can you connect the theory". Like can you play your scale fluently and land on a desired chord. And vice versa. Do you know how the scale degrees sound against each chord you know. That sort of stuff..
    And the third half of the question is how can you use the theory when actually playing a tune.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu View Post
    "How much theory" is only half of the question. The other half is "how can you connect the theory".
    "How much theory" might be the half of the question. But it's not half of the practice time or experience. More like 1/10000000 of the practice time, rest is the other half. Theory is the least of ones problems. It's like the first one month of a life time of work.

  49. #48
    I am trying to play the chords from autumn leaves by Watching them in the real book and playing. But when I watch tutoorials they use different fingerings on the chords than I do. Am I playing it wrong? Here is a video showning how I play it.
    . I know i am not playing the song in the full speed I am just demonstrating what chords I play...

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMalmis View Post
    I am trying to play the chords from autumn leaves by Watching them in the real book and playing. But when I watch tutoorials they use different fingerings on the chords than I do. Am I playing it wrong? Here is a video showning how I play it.
    . I know i am not playing the song in the full speed I am just demonstrating what chords I play...
    Is this thread a prank?

  51. #50
    This tab is not in C Major right? TAKE THE A TRAIN TAB by Duke Ellington @ Ultimate-Guitar.Com
    I wonder since that song is in C Major but some of the notes in that tab is not in the key of C Major. For example there is a A# in the tab but a# is not in c major.