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  1. #1

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    Hi all. Jazz guitar newbie here. I recently did a course at jazzguitarlessons.net (run by Marc-Andre Seguin), and it was really helpful. I'd never done an online guitar course before but it's something I'd like to try again. Doing a self-paced course in which I can watch videos but also post comments and get replies, was very helpful. I also liked being able to progress along the pathway of a course. It felt less isolating than self-study from books, too.

    Does anyone have recommendations for online jazz guitar courses for beginners? If not, I will do more courses at jazzguitarlessons.net but just wanted to get a sense of what people can recommend.

    PS My apologies if this question has already been asked. I did a search of the forum but couldn't see anything quite like this question.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    I guess I'm answering my own question but I just discovered Truefire and it looks like they have some great courses there.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    I guess I'm answering my own question but I just discovered Truefire and it looks like they have some great courses there.
    Yes - exactly what I wanted to say. I'd recommend Frank Vignola's "Jazz Studio" channel. Monthly subscription fee is low and there's lots of materials to work on and more added each month (and in between as well.)
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  5. #4

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    Two different guitarists that I've learned a lot from are Steven Crowell and Robert Conti.

    Although their extensive courses are physical books with DVDs they are both readily available to answer any questions that you have via e-mail.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    Learn To Play Jazz Guitar With Robert Conti

    Learn To Play Jazz Guitar With Steven Crowell

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    Yes - exactly what I wanted to say. I'd recommend Frank Vignola's "Jazz Studio" channel. Monthly subscription fee is low and there's lots of materials to work on and more added each month (and in between as well.)
    Agreed. Frank gives one a lot of bang for the buck. And his channel has a beginner's section, a listening room, technique exercises, lots of tunes (Frank is big on having students learn tunes), improv tips, riffs, chord melodies...
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Herron View Post
    Two different guitarists that I've learned a lot from are Steven Crowell and Robert Conti.
    I've learned a lot from Robert Conti too. He's a great guy. (I've talked with him on the phone many times over the years. Generous with his time. Has some great stories to tell.) The "Chord Melody Assembly Line" got me up and running on chord melody. Not my specialty by any means, but it was all Greek to me back then and it's not now. "The Precision Technique" helped me out too. Still play some of those Wohlfahrt etudes. Fun stuff--musical AND helpful.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #7
    Thanks very much, everyone, for your very helpful suggestions. The pricing and range of Truefire course is pretty great, so I am tempted to go with that for now. Also, my ultimate aim is to learn bebop and I see that Sheryl Bailey is a Truefire instructor, which is really exciting for me. I can't quite tell but I think her channel is a bit beyond my abilities at present; however, she does have some courses too, one of which looks doable for me.

    Bruce Arnold also has a Truefire course called Jazz Guitar for Beginners. That seems a logical place to start and the course is very comprehensive—yet so comprehensive as to be intimidating (for example, the need to know various kinds of scales in all positions). This leads me to a related question (and I hope I'm not digressing too much here): do I really have to learn so many scales in so many positions to start with? I'm just trying to work out what's the best course or courses to start with.

  9. #8

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    Go with the Frank Vignola recommendation. He has a different approach. One that you might like. You can try it for a couple of months. If it's not for you cancel it.

  10. #9

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    For comping, let me highly recommend Fareed Haque's Comping Survival Guide on TrueFire. I recently started working through that and I'm already seeing good effects, getting me away from my typical play-a-chord-and-then-some-inversion style of comping. There's a lot to digest, and I'd suggest taking it very slowly and allowing time for the concepts to sink in before moving to the next segment.
    Jeff

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    Thanks very much, everyone, for your very helpful suggestions. The pricing and range of Truefire course is pretty great, so I am tempted to go with that for now. Also, my ultimate aim is to learn bebop and I see that Sheryl Bailey is a Truefire instructor, which is really exciting for me. I can't quite tell but I think her channel is a bit beyond my abilities at present; however, she does have some courses too, one of which looks doable for me.

    Bruce Arnold also has a Truefire course called Jazz Guitar for Beginners. That seems a logical place to start and the course is very comprehensive—yet so comprehensive as to be intimidating (for example, the need to know various kinds of scales in all positions). This leads me to a related question (and I hope I'm not digressing too much here): do I really have to learn so many scales in so many positions to start with? I'm just trying to work out what's the best course or courses to start with.
    Can't go wrong with the TruFire stuff!

    In terms of scales, check-this-out:

    Midnight Blues

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blues View Post
    Can't go wrong with the TruFire stuff!

    In terms of scales, check-this-out:

    Thanks. A lot of that chord theory was beyond me but the overall message is reassuring! Interestingly, Jens Larsen says you mainly need three scales—major, harmonic minor and melodic minor, while Bruce Arnold's course covers quite a few more scales but not the harmonic or melodic minor. Bruce Arnold's course covers Major, Dorian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and the Major and Minor pentatonic scales—because "These scales are the most used scales for beginning jazz guitarists and will help you get started soloing on typical jazz chord changes." I guess I shouldn't be surprised that there are differing opinions as to what are the best scales to start with.

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    Thanks. A lot of that chord theory was beyond me but the overall message is reassuring! Interestingly, Jens Larsen says you mainly need three scales—major, harmonic minor and melodic minor, while Bruce Arnold's course covers quite a few more scales but not the harmonic or melodic minor. Bruce Arnold's course covers Major, Dorian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and the Major and Minor pentatonic scales—because "These scales are the most used scales for beginning jazz guitarists and will help you get started soloing on typical jazz chord changes." I guess I shouldn't be surprised that there are differing opinions as to what are the best scales to start with.
    You’re welcome.

    No surprise at all really. You have some that say don’t even bother with Modes...

    Jens is very theoretical, but he really breaks-it-down and communicates it very well IMHO. Of course, he doesn’t limit himself to just those three, but like Bruce Arnold, Jens feels these are the three main scales to really get you going. He’s got some great stuff and if you get the chance, check-out his YouTube channel.

    Here’s a new one he just posted a few days ago on Pentatonics:



    He’s got some great videos for beginners as well.


    Good luck and
    Midnight Blues

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    This leads me to a related question (and I hope I'm not digressing too much here): do I really have to learn so many scales in so many positions to start with?
    IMO not: work out a tune by learning the chord progression, the melody and the arppegios for the chords as a basis for improvising. At some point you will want to add more notes to your lines and that's early enough to find ot what scale fits and how to play it. You'll learn your scales much better that way compared to just practice and memorize them.

    my 2 cents...
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    I guess I'm answering my own question but I just discovered Truefire and it looks like they have some great courses there.
    +1 for TrueFire.
    Go check out the list of Jazz instructors; I'm sure you will recognize the names.
    And many of them are available for one-on-one sessions.
    Jeff Scheetz's lesson format is solid.

  16. #15

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    I’m a big booster for Fareed Haque’s courses on TrueFire. The comping, bebop, and modal courses in particular.

    Only caveat is that he packs A LOT into a quick series of videos. He is a master of demystifying the concepts and making them seem logical and obvious. But it can lull you into a sense that it should be easy. It’s not. One five minute segment can give you an exercise that you could shed for months before it becomes part of your playing. It’s like what they say about Buddhism: it can be complicated or simple, but it is never easy.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Midnight Blues View Post
    You’re welcome.

    Here’s a new one he just posted a few days ago on Pentatonics:



    He’s got some great videos for beginners as well.
    Good luck and
    Thanks very much. That new video from Jens is pitched very close to where my knowledge and skill level is at, so it was pretty much perfect.

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post
    I’m a big booster for Fareed Haque’s courses on TrueFire. The comping, bebop, and modal courses in particular.

    Only caveat is that he packs A LOT into a quick series of videos. He is a master of demystifying the concepts and making them seem logical and obvious. But it can lull you into a sense that it should be easy. It’s not. One five minute segment can give you an exercise that you could shed for months before it becomes part of your playing. It’s like what they say about Buddhism: it can be complicated or simple, but it is never easy.
    Thanks! I'm really keen to learn playing bebop so his bebop course is of definite interest!

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by RoboTom View Post
    Thanks very much. That new video from Jens is pitched very close to where my knowledge and skill level is at, so it was pretty much perfect.
    You’re welcome and glad to read that RT!
    Midnight Blues

  20. #19

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    Don't even bother with online courses . Get yourself a sensei , a local professional who's playing you like .

    He will inspire and encourage you in a way that videos can't and show you how great musicians approach music and the process of learning and creating .

    The ' master - apprentice ' way of learning is how the greats did it and this music is as much about attitude or spirit as about the technical details - none of which are that difficult .

    That said , the Jens Larsen videos are a good place to start .

  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Pycroft View Post
    Don't even bother with online courses . Get yourself a sensei , a local professional who's playing you like .

    He will inspire and encourage you in a way that videos can't and show you how great musicians approach music and the process of learning and creating .
    I found the first online course I did to be really beneficial for my playing, as well as being more convenient and cheaper than in-person lessons. Thanks for the advice—it's good to hear another perspective and I definitely don't rule out in-person lessons at some stage, but just not right now

  22. #21

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    If you want to learn to play bebop, as you say in this thread, and you live in Toronto, as you say in another, then you should study the Barry Harris method in one of Howard Rees's weekly group classes:

    Howard Rees' Jazz Workshops (howardrees@jazzworkshops.com)

    He does offer online classes (jazzschoolonline.com) but live group lessons are so much better because you will learn from other students and learn to play with others at the same time.

    Highly recommended assuming you have at least basic familiarity with your instrument. Be aware that with Howard you will not be studying guitar, you will be studying bebop.

  23. #22

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    Oh yeah , workshops , part-time courses , jam sessions , play in a funk/soul band with jazz influences and a few solos , play with musicians other than guitarists ....any opportunity to learn by practice .

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by pcjazz View Post
    If you want to learn to play bebop, as you say in this thread, and you live in Toronto, as you say in another, then you should study the Barry Harris method in one of Howard Rees's weekly group classes:

    Howard Rees' Jazz Workshops (howardrees@jazzworkshops.com)

    He does offer online classes (jazzschoolonline.com) but live group lessons are so much better because you will learn from other students and learn to play with others at the same time.

    Highly recommended assuming you have at least basic familiarity with your instrument. Be aware that with Howard you will not be studying guitar, you will be studying bebop.
    Thank you. I had no idea that this existed. I think I need to get some more skills and confidence under my belt before I go with the live group lessons but they sound fantastic and something I'd be keen to try in the future. So great that this is in Toronto.

    Thank you to everyone who has commented so far. I very much appreciate all the helpful advice.

  25. #24

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    jazzschoolonline.com if you have some money, “things i learned from barry harris” on youtube if you don’t
    White belt
    My Youtube

  26. #25

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    Buy all Mimi Fox courses available.