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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by rave
    Based on your post you may like the Herb Ellis Books. The approach is based on Shapes and how the shapes relate to scales, arpeggios and the chords. There are also solos that show how to apply the shapes. There are three of them, Swing Blues, All the Shapes You Are and Rhythm Shapes. I have the precursor Blues Shapes and it has been helpful even though I play more traditional blues as it shows you possibilities over chord types. Good luck
    I've learned a lot from Herb's books.

    I've had the Fewell book for over two years but haven't worked in it yet. I'll get to it eventually, I'm sure.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I've learned a lot from Herb's books.

    I've had the Fewell book for over two years but haven't worked in it yet. I'll get to it eventually, I'm sure.
    Even after working on the H. Ellis & C. Kaye material, I'll wager that when you do get around to Fewell's book it'll be a game changer for you.

  4. #53

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    Excuse me for writing again.

    You helped me a lot with your answers

    I buy very little lately, and Herb Ellis's books will buy,because I love his playing.

    I also really like playing the saxophones.

    And I named a few.

    I remember reading that guitarists Jim Hall, wanted to sound like saxophones and Charlie Christian also.

    Perhaps I'm not quite sure what I say.

    I make a pretty good buy and I have on its recommendations..

    I do not know if you have references to saxophonists.

    I love them.

    I do not know if there textbooks of Paul Desmond, stant Getz, Lester Young that are teaching.

    Excuse me for writing again, but I would buy it all together, and do not know if anyone has more textbooks and good XD.

    Thanks to all

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jvilpaz
    I do not know if you have references to saxophonists.

    I love them.
    Yes! Lennie Niehaus is an alto player and a great teacher. He has several books out that players of other instruments. I've been working in his "Lennie Niehaus Plays the Blues" which contains solos he wrote for the 12 play-along tracks on Jamey Aebersold's volume 42, the blues in all 12 keys. (I have the "C" version, which means the lines are written in treble clef)
    Jamey Aebersold Jazz: Lennie Niehaus Plays The Blues - Etudes for Vol. 42 "Blues In All Key


    This is a book of his that I've heard nothing but good things about. It comes with a CD and you can hear the exercises and etudes played by an alto sax (Eb instrument), tenor sax (Bb instrument) and guitar (C instrument).

    Jamey Aebersold Jazz: Jazz Conception For Saxophone - Basic #1 Book/CD

  6. #55

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    Thanks to those who posted about the Fewell book, I just ordered it (I even upgraded the shipping in my excitement).

  7. #56

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    Thanks to all who wrote in this post, except for Jerry Bergonzi, had no quality information.

    All recommendations are welcome, and will be studied.
    I apologize for the lack of writing. I only know how to read English but not write.

    Thanks friends

  8. #57

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    Quote Originally Posted by gggomez
    I have recently moved from the Bruno program to the Joseph Alexander books.

    It is a natural extension of the Bruno school but in my opinion presented in a much much better way. Is more jazz and is all about how to build your own "jazz" lines, introducing outside notes in a easy to absorb way and more instructional on how when why to play them:

    Fundamental Changes in Jazz Guitar: An In depth Study of Major ii V I Bebop Soloing: Mr Joseph Alexander: 9781480208247: Amazon.com: Books

    at $10 for the ebook it is a ripper.

    I started with the Blues one it was so good I thought I am going back to this one, the beginning. So glad I did, substituting the flat 9 for the route on the dominant chord, I did not know that, sounds fantastic. Playing the outside note on 4 I kind of new but doing exercises focused on that is accelerating my learning.

    Cheers
    I also like his books and have all 3 (of course, i buy everything).

    also like G. Fewell's

    and this
    http://www.amazon.com/Introduction-J.../dp/0634009702

  9. #58
    paulcw16 Guest
    Hal Crook's How to Improvise is also very good.

  10. #59

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    I've had the following two books for a while now but never really spent much time with them, and I'm trying to decide which to focus on:


    • A Melodic Approach by Garrison Fewell
    • Introduction to Jazz Guitar Improvisation by Joe Elliott


    I know that they are both highly regarded, but I noted a couple of differences that make we wonder which is better for me to start off with:

    1. From the limited time that I've spent with them, it seems like "Melodic Approach..." gives you a near instant "hip sound" (with the alternating triads generating color tones), while "Introduction..." starts off with the more rigorous "connecting game" to get you to really focus on hitting the chord tones through the changes (before moving on to color tones).

    2. Also, "Melodic Approach..." starts off immediately with patterns that require shifting position, while "Introduction..." seems to be focused entirely on position playing. Not sure if it treats position shifting in a later chapter or not, but it mentions early on that if you learn the arpeggios in enough of the five patterns, then you can navigate through changing chords and even changing key centers without having to shift positions.

    Any thoughts on which to focus on first?

  11. #60

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    Introduction to Jazz Guitar Improvisation should be the first IMO. It's about the more fundamental skill of playing the changes.
    A melodic approach is more like a master class. It (implicitly) assumes that you already have some background in improvisation but helps you build better melodic lines by using triadic upper extensions. That's a particular device that's widely used and very effective. But typically people first focus on being able to play chord tone lines over tunes (with passing notes, chromatics and embellishments) and be able to voice lead them before worrying about line building.

  12. #61

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    I beg to differ there (without saying which one should be focused on first). I don't see Garrison Fewell's book as a "master class" ("Harmonic Approach" may fit that description better).
    Somebody who has played guitar for a while but nothing in terms of jazz can dive right into it.
    On the topic of "connecting" - from about the middle of the book you'll be working on guide tones - first for chords/comping than using guide tones to build lines that connect the changes.

    I don't know the other book so I can't give you a recommendation but Mr. Fewell's book really steered me in the right direction.

  13. #62

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    My company, Chord Melody Guitar Music, has been in business now for 36 years and a lot of guitarists phone in their orders so I have gotten a lot of feedback over the years from various guitarists on different books and DVDs.

    Although we have sold copies of both the Fewell and Elliott books no one has ever phoned and said whether they liked either of them or not so I can't provide you with any feedback on those.

    Since you are interested in improvising, I can tell you that I have gotten consistently good feedback over the years from guitarists who have purchased and used The Ticket To Improv series of instructional DVDs by guitarist Robert Conti.

  14. #63
    They are really pretty DIFFERENT books. Maybe start with the Fewell, but the other may have value in a different way later.

  15. #64

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steven Herron
    Ticket To Improv series of instructional DVDs by guitarist Robert Conti.
    Actually I have it already! (Vol 1) I forgot about this one, because it was packed away from when we moved. Also it's harder to browse through it without having a hard copy (just PDFs on the DVD I think). But I'll take a look. Chord Melody Assembly Line from the same author worked wonders for me.

    I think that about does it for the improv books in my collection, unless you count the second half of Mickey Baker.

  16. #65

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    Joe Elliot's book really helped me a lot. Not only does he give you instruction on what to play but how to practice it. This is the best book I've experienced on how to practice the lessons. A few pages of reading and a few weeks of practicing those pages.

  17. #66

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    I have and gone through both books. The thing about the upper extensions (Fewell's book) is that they are melodic not harmonic (hence the name of the book). Upper extensions sound harmonically ambiguous therefore generally not very effective notes for "playing the changes" and outlining harmony. For that reason I consider it a more advanced topic. Yes, the book covers other things as well but "melodic extensions" is it's main focus as I remember.
    Joe Elliot's book about gets you to focus on outlining harmony over common progressions. That should be the primer for everything else to build upon. You got to hear the changes even of you don't always play them. The books approach trains you for that (there are also many other resources that teach the same fundamental skill).
    Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying being able to build lines using upper extensions isn't important, but if you're asking what would be the logical starting point, I'd say playing the changes.
    I also have Fewell's harmonic approach book. It's a jazz harmony book written in a unique style. It covers selected topics with an eye on improvisation rather than being an encyclopedic reference. Both of his books are extremely good. But that's a separate point.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 01-28-2019 at 12:32 PM.

  18. #67

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    I would vote for
    • A Melodic Approach by Garrison Fewell

  19. #68

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    I think triads are the jazz secret, and the perfect way to visualize harmony and melody in the guitar. I really like Garrison Fewell's book, but I think Jordan Klemons is setting the perfect path for be one with the sound in his NYCJAZZ GUITAR MELODIC TRIADS GROUP.

  20. #69

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    Jody Fisher also has some good material.

  21. #70

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    So many guitar tuition books out there! I am teaching a friend of mine plectrum guitar. I could buy a book online but a lot of books do not really tell you whats inside that book. He is a complete beginner. I am looking for a book that:
    a) Teaches how to read music
    b) Easy Scales
    c) Chords
    d) Possibly tab with the music but not essential
    e )Easy 'good old standard' tunes--not pop / heavy metal(!!!!!) and no photo's of the latest 'one minute wonder' groups etc.

    Does such a book exist these days?
    Suggestions welcome.
    Many thanks.

  22. #71

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    To be honest, that sounds like the old Mel Bay Modern Guitar Method.

    Lots of kids quit guitar because of those books. But they’re not too bad if you’re motivated to read music and practice.

  23. #72

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    You Can Teach Yourself Jazz Guitar eBook + Online Audio - Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    Complete Jazz Guitar Method Book + Online Audio/Video - Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    These two books are good if the student shows some talent early on. Otherwise the Mel Bay Modern Guitar Method would take the longer route.

  24. #73

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  25. #74

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    I found the Leavitt book one and Mel Bays Modern guitar methods both good at teaching reading notation. The tunes in both are pretty nice to play on the guitar too. Nice for plectrum style playing.

  26. #75

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    I realise this to be an old thread, but beginners will find it as long as JGF keeps it available.

    To get started, Roger Edison's book gives you 60 chords that sound well together and fall under the hand in a logical fashion. They're all you'll ever need. Very utilitarian. You can add chords to these later from other books like Johnny Rector's or Baker's, but Edison explains how Rhythm Change tunes and 12-Bar tunes are put together. He provides seven tunes that explicitly use the chords and many 2-5 drills to get you nimble until the chords are engrained. Back-cycling and substitutions are explained very well. A book to keep forever, but you can master it quickly if you apply yourself moderately. You will be able to comp in any situation.
    Ideal for beginners, but out of print. I got lucky at a Value Village. However it's available to download:
    [Roger Edison] Jazz Rhythm Guitar | Popular Music | Jazz (scribd.com)

    Also, Chord-Melody is a really crucial objective for any aspiring Jazz Guitarist, whether behind a singer or in a Jazz Group or playing alone in a pub or bar. Mel Bay has two books with about 20 of the most popular songs in each. Music notation and Tab for each song in all three styles: chord-melody, single-note soloing and comping. The tab gets you started quickly. Later you can improve on your reading.

    Mel Bay Jazz Guitar Standards Vol1 and Vol2
    Jazz Guitar Standards Book - Alfred Publishing, Inc./Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    Jazz Guitar Standards II: Complete Approach to Playing Tunes Book - Alfred Publishing, Inc./Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    I've tried before, but now retired, I can earnestly start going through these three books and hope to play solo guitar as an amateur at any venue that will take me. Who knows, I might find a real gig, land a vocalist or just play with other musicians interested in the American Songbook. Cheers from Oshawa, Ontario!

  27. #76

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    Zombie thread but

  28. #77

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    I found a good guitar book by Dr. House MD, but two young people broke into my home and took it, unfortunately. In it, he lists all the possibilities, but then he crosses them all out and does what he wants. Fortunately, no one died.

  29. #78

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    I really think Randy Vincent's book
    The Guitarist's Introduction to Jazz fits the bill.
    https://randyvincent.com/books/

    I'm currently working through it and lots of things are clicking into place for me.

    Shell chords and Drop 2 chords have opened things right up. I have fingers spare now!

  30. #79

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    I looked into the Randy Vincent book but it seems there are no tabs, so for me, the illiterate amateur, it might be hard to start with this book. Or i could ofcourse start learning to read music.. Now that i’m thinking about it, might be a fun project to try and create the tabs for the book.

  31. #80

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    I feel ya! I've noodled away and gigged for 35 years only knowing chord symbols and big fat barre chords. I've decided to learn to read the dots and found it's not as hard or scary as I'd imagined. I'm working through the William Leavitt books for that. The combination of Vincent and Leavitt, and sitting at a piano at times to get my head round basic general jazz theory, is exactly where I am in my studies right now.
    Whatever you decide, have fun and enjoy the journey.

  32. #81

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    And now for something completely different...

    Seeing as we're now speaking of the confounded art of Reading Music... One wee trick I've learned for reading music is to practice Chord-Spelling. Yes, that lost art. Practice this on the train instead of doing a crossword or flirting in vain and getting arrested. Please keep in mind that this information is only for RAG's (Rank Amateur Guitarists), such as myself. Pro's (People Who Rant On (May God bless them!)) are far too gifted to pay any heed to this simple gem. Of course, I learned this accidently, on my own and far too late in life to ever to become a famous star!

    Imagine any possible chord and try to spell it! Glorious, no? A royale game for kings! Why, a game better than ping-pong! Though some may take offence at that comparison, I still insist on it. Sounds easy, but it can be deceptively so. It's the game that keeps on giving. You can amuse yourself and amaze your friends!

    Simply memorise this rotating sequence: CEGBDFACEG... (The Musical Alphabet!)
    You may begin it on any letter, as long as you maintain the order. You must maintain the order! Also known as the letter-names in thirds:
    C major is CEG. CM79 is CEGBD. C7-9 is CEGBbDb. F major is FAC. FM7 is FACE.
    F minor is FAbC. F7 is FACEb.

    (As a side-note... Notice the Upper Structures! You can plainly see that EGBD is the upper structure of CEGBD. What does that tell you? Well, EGBD is Em7 and since CEGBD is CM79, you may substitute Em7 for CM79. And Gm6 is GBbDFb while Em7-5 is EGBbD. By Chord-Spelling, you can see that they are similes and can sub for each other. C79 is CEGBbD. Take out the Root C and this chord is a simile of the above two chords. Gm6=C79NR=Em7-5. (NR=No Root) As I said earlier, this post is only valuable to RAGS. Most know this stuff, but it proves the value of Chord Spelling.)

    Now, bear in mind that F7 is never FACD#! Never! D# is not in the sequence. Ignore or avoid this type of behaviour. Seconding is a foul. You must always spell in Thirds! That's why Co7 is spelled as CEbGbBbb and never as CEbGbA! Follow the Musical Alphabet Sequence, regardless of any bad habits that you may have developed in the past as a wastrel. You must say FACEb. The chord must always be spelled in thirds, of course, but only with the letters from the sequence given above! Only use the letters CEGBDFACEGBD... And in that order. Else said, then rap your knuckles! They are your new friends in music...

    An Extra For Experts!!
    Your illustrious band leader demands that you play EbM13-5-9? Without the 11th.
    So, how do you raed this on the staff? Sorry, I meant to say read.
    Well, get out your wee pencils lads and lassies!
    Start with EGBDFAC from the Sequence above. 1 to 13. Then apply the cursed accidentals...
    For some reason unbeknownst to me, the key of Eb contains three accidentals in the Key Signature: Bb, Eb, and their third cousin Ab.
    Now EGBDFAC becomes EbGBbDFAbC. But that spells EbM13, you say? And everyone is calling out to you to alter it. Well, simply flatten the fifth and the ninth to: EbGBbbDFbAbC!

    You may prefer to spell this as EbGADbEAbC. But you will get your knuckles rapped hard, because you did not follow the order and now confusion reigns. And it will look dreadful on the staff! And you will never learn to READ MUSIC!

    And did you toss out the poor unwanted 11th?
    Congratulations! If you spelled it as EbGBbbDFbC, YOU HAVE WON!
    EbGBbbDFbC is 1 3 5b 7 9b 13 is M13-5-9.
    It lays well on the staff because the Key Signature tells you that the B, E and A are flattened. All you have to do is write in the two flat symbols beside the chord's Bbb and Fb. See? It's not simply robotic. To read, you must understand...

    Though, after hearing this chord, (my budgie is looking unwell) I think that I might have selected a dominant 13-5-9. My regrets to Mickey Baker. There you go! SPELL THAT CHORD!

    See how that works, eh?!
    NOW, YOU KNOW THE REST OF THE STORY... (Please forgive this small musical joke.)

    Since writing this, I have modified the game slightly. I now apply the rules of Hangman. When I make a mistake, I draw part of the hanged man on the gallows and continue with the game. However, once the entire man has been drawn, I must stop playing or I will get a headache. You know, sometimes it's better to quit while you're ahead.

    This will help you immensely when reading chord stacks. (Now, there's the rub!)
    Notice that the 5 lines of the staff are: EGBDF
    Notice that the 5 spaces on the staff are: FACEG
    So the lines and spaces follow the sequence. This is how chords lay on the musical staff. And we often play chords and arpeggios anyway. Even the Ledgers are in agreement.

    You can sit on the bus looking greatly amused, all by yourself, staring off into the distance with a strange look of bedevilment, consternation, amusement and eternal satisfaction as you spell your chords! But do not sing them aloud. Your fellow travellers will become greatly jealous. They may even become vexed at you! So try to be discreet. Chord Spelling! Do It!
    Last edited by StringNavigator; 03-24-2021 at 03:57 PM.

  33. #82

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    That. Is. Brilliant.

    Thank you so much for sharing that!!!

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by StringNavigator
    I realise this to be an old thread, but beginners will find it as long as JGF keeps it available.

    To get started, Roger Edison's book gives you 60 chords that sound well together and fall under the hand in a logical fashion. They're all you'll ever need. Very utilitarian. You can add chords to these later from other books like Johnny Rector's or Baker's, but Edison explains how Rhythm Change tunes and 12-Bar tunes are put together. He provides seven tunes that explicitly use the chords and many 2-5 drills to get you nimble until the chords are engrained. Back-cycling and substitutions are explained very well. A book to keep forever, but you can master it quickly if you apply yourself moderately. You will be able to comp in any situation.
    Ideal for beginners, but out of print. I got lucky at a Value Village. However it's available to download:
    [Roger Edison] Jazz Rhythm Guitar | Popular Music | Jazz (scribd.com)

    Also, Chord-Melody is a really crucial objective for any aspiring Jazz Guitarist, whether behind a singer or in a Jazz Group or playing alone in a pub or bar. Mel Bay has two books with about 20 of the most popular songs in each. Music notation and Tab for each song in all three styles: chord-melody, single-note soloing and comping. The tab gets you started quickly. Later you can improve on your reading.

    Mel Bay Jazz Guitar Standards Vol1 and Vol2
    Jazz Guitar Standards Book - Alfred Publishing, Inc./Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    Jazz Guitar Standards II: Complete Approach to Playing Tunes Book - Alfred Publishing, Inc./Mel Bay Publications, Inc. : Mel Bay

    I've tried before, but now retired, I can earnestly start going through these three books and hope to play solo guitar as an amateur at any venue that will take me. Who knows, I might find a real gig, land a vocalist or just play with other musicians interested in the American Songbook. Cheers from Oshawa, Ontario!
    Alas the Edison book on Scribd is available only if you have a subscription. I'm tempted to try the 30-day plan just so I can download it, but I'm usually pretty awful at things like that. Of course, it's available on eBay for $104.00, so the Scribd looks positively gorgeous by comparison!

  35. #84

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    I'm thinking that they won't ever re-print it because publishers want you to buy book after book while you're chasing the bird. Since people are getting paid by the word, most tutorial books today consist of many pages devoted to prefaces, introductions, biographies, indexes, contents, how to use the book, ads for other books, glossaries of musical terms, how to tune the guitar, three page primers on musical notation, and a conclusion. This goes for the vast majority of bass and guitar books on the market. The actual reason you bought the book gets the few pages left over. Some books even have three pages devoted to photos of the author's guitar...

    Roger Edison wrote a most useful and comprehensive book and you can tell that he wanted to convey the knowledge and skills for you to become adept at Jazz Guitar. I also have an old bass book by Bob Haggart and two other books by Eddie Lang and Johnny Smith. Judging by those, I'm afraid that it's been all downhill since the thirties. Why, even the majority of Jazz Standards that we play today stem from the 30's and 40's. What's really telling, as we play through the Real Book, is when the realisation hits you that everybody's dead...
    Last edited by StringNavigator; 04-03-2021 at 09:54 AM.

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by StringNavigator
    I

    ...the realisation hits you that everybody's dead...
    Nil desperandum! Not everybody's dead Just came from an evening of socially distanced playing with an 80 year-old pianist playing lots of 30's and 40's standards. It was a great opportunity to practice my Freddie Green rhythms when I wasn't taking a solo backed by very comprehensive chord and bass-lines from my veteran colleague. A great night was had by all.

  37. #86

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    Glad to hear about it!

  38. #87

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    I would recommend any book that has recorded Mp3's of all the notation in the book--where the person who recorded the samples is a real jazz musician.

    I went through all of the Jazz Conception books by Jim Snidero. These are all etudes of varying difficulty over standards, blues, and beyond. Jim Snidero is a great soloist, arranger, and educator. But forget all of that. Why were these books ridiculously valuable to my own progression in music?

    One name... Keep scrolling down



    Joe Cohn plays the guitar part for all of Jim Snidero's Jazz Conception series. These are etudes. No writing. No theory. Still worth the purchase to hear a storied professional play these etudes:

    Snidero Books - Our Products

  39. #88

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    I know they're old, but I remember liking the very practical, hands on approach of the Arnie Berle books.

    I know that tab is frowned upon, and I agree it had limitations, but the Charlie Parker for Guitar book helped me getting started in translating horn language to the guitar. A teacher might have shown me the same thing, but between a day job and a family this was a good resource for learning some things.

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by waltf
    I looked into the Randy Vincent book but it seems there are no tabs, so for me, the illiterate amateur, it might be hard to start with this book. Or i could of course start learning to read music.. Now that i’m thinking about it, might be a fun project to try and create the tabs for the book.
    The Randy Vincent book will take you a long way. If you learn how to read music you won't need to create TABS Reading standard notation is not difficult. C D E F G A B and sometimes you have to raise or lower them a 1/2 step. Take a pencil and jot down the note names next to the standard notation. You will learn much. The Vincent book does have some chord diagrams.


    Recommend Me a Method Book for "The Jazz Guitar Basics"-g-clef-jpg

  41. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by alltunes
    The Randy Vincent book will take you a long way. If you learn how to read music you won't need to create TABS Reading standard notation is not difficult. C D E F G A B and sometimes you have to raise or lower them a 1/2 step. Take a pencil and jot down the note names next to the standard notation. You will learn much. The Vincent book does have some chord diagrams.
    There is a lot more to reading than that.

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    There is a lot more to reading than that.
    Of course there is but you have to get started somewhere. Deciphering standard notation so it reveals the same limited information as TAB is not difficult. I stand by my statement that taking a pencil and writing the name of the notes next to the standard notation will be a great learning experience. Too many musicians/hobbyists make excuses for not learning how to read music.

  43. #92

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    The first step in reading is to memorise the notes on the fingerboard ON THE FIRST FIVE FRETS ONLY WITH THE OPEN STRINGS.

    Too many try to memorise the entire fingerboard in the beginning. That will come later. Horn players have less notes to contend with. The guitar has approximately 6x22=132 possible notes! In comparison, the Tenor Saxophone has about 20, (unless you become a virtuoso and extend the range). Until you become a guitar virtuoso, stick to the first five frets. That's enough for reading! If you stick to memorising the first five frets and map those notes (approx 25) to the staff, you'll have thousands of songs available to read.

    Remember that your normal range for a typical piece of music for beginners is one octave (8 notes), with some excursions above and below (4?). There may be a few accidentals (2? sharps/flats). That's 12 or 14 notes in any given song.

    The lower ledger lines are hard to read until you realise that they are just a part of the Bass Clef.

    Practice reading the rhythm figures of a piece separately, until memorised. In most music, you will find the rhythm-figures repeat a lot. Practice reading the notes of the piece in question. Simple tunes often only have a dozen notes to contend with. Just practice the scale of the key of that song. Divide and conquer. Remove the stress by treating it as a game. Do it for yourself.

    If you want to start reading by using a Charlie Parker tune (virtuoso), you're going to get discouraged. You have to work your way up that.

    If you get fussy about fingering you will have to play in the higher positions. But you will have to learn the notes in that position. Better to stay within frets 1 to 5 and simply accept the fingering required.

    As you repeat a piece of music, look at the next bar following the one actually being played. Look ahead!

    Remember that chords are always spelled in the same order: CEGBDFACEGBD... This makes them easier to read. Never spell a chord as CEbGbA. The A is out of order. Spell it as CEbGbBbb.

    Reading is easier than one thinks, but you must memorise your rudiments, like the Cycle of 5ths/4ths and the key signatures, staff lines & spaces. It's just repetition and perseverance. But you have to WANT it! So take the time to own it. If you can pay for a teacher, fine, but you will still have to do it at home on your own, anyway. A Music Teacher cannot press a button and do it for you.

    Even orchestra musicians practice the pieces they perform. They don't sight read on stage. Eventually they look at the music as a memory aide. If you sight read every note on stage, you will go nuts. They have memorised the piece with the written music in front of them. Stick to one tune until you can play it from memory with the written music in front of you.

    Maybe, eventually, you will sight-read. But as your life bobs and weaves through its battle, you may never reach the lofty heights of sight-reading. Be content with just being able to read. Keep reading a piece of music until you memorised the music WITH the notation in front of you and can play it smoothly with few mistakes. The next song will be easier.

    They say to read anything you find to become a sight-reader. I believe that comes later. Keep things simple in the beginning: nursery rhymes, children's songs, simple folksongs...

    And, believe it or not, writing the note names in pencil beside the note DEFEATS the very process you must go through to learn to read. Face the music! Better to work with just a couple of lines and spaces at a time. INCULCATE those 3 or 4 notes (fingerboard and staff) into your fingers by boring repetition. Map the fingerboard and staff one small step at a time.
    Last edited by StringNavigator; 04-13-2021 at 10:52 AM.

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by StringNavigator
    .
    Remember that chords are always spelled in the same order: CEGBDFACEGBD... This makes them easier to read. Never spell a chord as CEbGbA. The A is out of order. Spell it as CEbGbBbb.
    It all makes perfect sense.