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  1. #201

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    Little question for the Mickey Bakerites here.

    I'm at Lesson 17 where he wants you to use the techniques so far to comp on some standards. Lesson 16 has a nice little table of the best way to connect a dominant to any other chord, which I suppose is supposed to serve as a foundation.

    Most jazz standards are going to be loaded with ii-V's and there won't be many changes that are in that chart. In fact, there are precious few ii-V's listed at the top for any of the basic unembellished chord progressions in the book.

    So what are people doing to handle the ii-V's. Just pretty much play them straight using the chords that have been given?

    The problem is - if you only do that, you're not really practicing the system of substituting which he is pushing (which is mainly playing the minor a 5th up from the root of a dominant up).

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #202

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterk1 View Post
    Little question for the Mickey Bakerites here.

    In fact, there are precious few ii-V's listed at the top for any of the basic unembellished chord progressions in the book.
    "At the top" do you mean in Lesson 16? It's full of Dm/G7s
    So what are people doing to handle the ii-V's. Just pretty much play them straight using the chords that have been given?
    Do you mean the chords that are shown in L16?

    The problem is - if you only do that, you're not really practicing the system of substituting which he is pushing (which is mainly playing the minor a 5th up from the root of a dominant up).
    If he has 2 bars of G7, you could play Dm/G7 variations or you could play Em/A7/Dm/G7 or Tritone subs. Or you could use chromatic movement where it fits.
    Don't forget that, by today's standards, the book is a basic introduction. If Mickey covered everything for $8, why would Berklee exist?

  4. #203

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    Quote Originally Posted by Banksia View Post
    Don't forget that, by today's standards, the book is a basic introduction. If Mickey covered everything for $8, why would Berklee exist?
    In light of this, do you think it is still a good book for those of us new to the jazz game? I'm really enjoying the lessons so far so I am sure it is worthwhile for me but just curious to hear opinions on this.

  5. #204

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    It IS worthwhile.

  6. #205

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzpunk View Post
    In light of this, do you think it is still a good book for those of us new to the jazz game? I'm really enjoying the lessons so far so I am sure it is worthwhile for me but just curious to hear opinions on this.
    It is definitely worth working through because those chords and their applications are all still used today. Also, one of the hardest things for beginners is the feeling that you are not making any progress. With the first page of chords in the Mickey book you start sounding jazzy - you can pick up a standard like "Out of Nowhere" and you can sound like a jazz player.

    I think its worth learning older material, particularly for guitarists, because one of the best jazz lineups you hear these days is the guitar backing a singer, usually on old standards.

    I also believe that jazz isn't just a system of notes and chords. Jazz is a culture. It has history, legends, movements, reactions and low points. I believe that Rosenwinkel only exists because Charlie Christian existed, and Django and Lonnie Johnson. Half of the meaning of Parker comes from contrasting him against what came before - Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young.

  7. #206

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzpunk View Post
    In light of this, do you think it is still a good book for those of us new to the jazz game? I'm really enjoying the lessons so far so I am sure it is worthwhile for me but just curious to hear opinions on this.
    Good afternoon, Jazzpunk...
    Finish it first, then ask again...
    More seriously, there are many other books, methods, courses etc. (including teacher tuition...); there is no complete single way, imho. Any and all are good for learning something, and up to a certain point, the more the merrier. For my part, if I had to choose one (non-teacher...) method, it would be MB, but to each his own.
    (...but finish it first anyway...)
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  8. #207

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    Quote Originally Posted by Banksia View Post
    It is definitely worth working through because those chords and their applications are all still used today. Also, one of the hardest things for beginners is the feeling that you are not making any progress. With the first page of chords in the Mickey book you start sounding jazzy - you can pick up a standard like "Out of Nowhere" and you can sound like a jazz player.

    I think its worth learning older material, particularly for guitarists, because one of the best jazz lineups you hear these days is the guitar backing a singer, usually on old standards.

    I also believe that jazz isn't just a system of notes and chords. Jazz is a culture. It has history, legends, movements, reactions and low points. I believe that Rosenwinkel only exists because Charlie Christian existed, and Django and Lonnie Johnson. Half of the meaning of Parker comes from contrasting him against what came before - Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young.
    Thanks for your insights!

  9. #208

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad3353 View Post
    Good afternoon, Jazzpunk...
    Finish it first, then ask again...
    Haha, planning on it! Definitely enjoying it so far.

  10. #209

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    I'm enjoying it too, and after spending two practice sessions applying those ideas in L1 -L16 to All The Things You Are, I do have something, and it sounds OK...I just wished it sounded a little better.

    Mickey seems to be leaning mostly on stuff like this for the II -V

    Orig : Dm7 / / / G7 / / /
    Altered: Dm7 / Dm6 / Dm7 / G13 G7#5b9


    I don't know....elongating the Dm7 so you're playing it longer than the bar it's been allotted doesn't sound too dynamic. I wish there were more ideas given for that progression.

    I'll check to see if I can find the Em/A7/Dm/G7 idea but I'm pretty sure he hasn't introduced any tritone subs yet.

    He does have some nice ideas presented for 2 bars of a maj7 chord which sound totally square if you don't have any tricks up your sleeve.
    Last edited by peterk1; 12-27-2010 at 05:48 PM.

  11. #210

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterk1 View Post
    ...I wish there were more ideas given for that progression...
    Good evening, peterk1...
    Have you perhaps skipped too quickly over Lessons 10, 11 & 12? All the possibilities are not on the pages, of course (did you do the 'scrapbook' part for your own findings..?). If you look at most Realbooks, you'll be able to recognise most alternative chords. Personally, I work out from the Vanilla book, then compare with a Realbook to see how others have interpreted things.
    It's true that some of these 'building blocks' can sound 'corny' on their own, you have to play around with them (arpeggios, trying out melody lines, altering notes here and there...) to wring a bit of fun out of them. It's all there, though, to be found...
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  12. #211

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad3353 View Post
    Good evening, peterk1...
    Have you perhaps skipped too quickly over Lessons 10, 11 & 12?
    Not really. There are precious few ideas for ii-V's in there, directly annotated as being good over a ii-V ...and the one's that are, I'm using them. I think that using the vanilla book instead of a fake book is probably a good idea here.

  13. #212

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    Hi all!

    Just letting you know I'm still here and will be ready to move onto lesson 4 in a couple of days.
    There are still one or two changes that I'm not quite smooth on, but I'll be there soon and it'll sound even better.

    For variety, is now a good time to pick something out of Aebersold's Vol 54 (Maiden Voyage) to have a go at or should I stick with pure MB for a bit longer?

    I'm finding the dextrous challenge of the MB lessons very addictive.

    Steve

  14. #213

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSteve View Post
    ...something out of Aebersold's Vol 54 (Maiden Voyage) ...
    Good evening, BigSteve...
    Well done..! No, it's not too early to put into (modest...) application the chords you've adopted. Might I suggest 'Satin Doll' as being (fairly...) easy? It has lot's of 'ii-V7' for you to substitute (play the written chords first, then try to fit MB chords appropriately...). Let us know how you find it (or whatever you choose...), please?
    Hope this helps...
    (keep up the MB, of course; Maiden Voyage and such is as well, not instead of..! )
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  15. #214

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    Quote Originally Posted by pierre richard View Post
    hey spider...both of mine have $1.50 on the cover also....these opened a bi
    g door for me when I got them back in............
    time on the instrument..........pierre.........
    It took me over a year to work through the Mickey Baker book 1 and I still use it as a reference. This book will put a lot of chords under your fingers and give you insight into how to substitute chords. If you use this book take your time, a significant amount of info is presented without much explaining - it will take some time to digest the material. I think this is one of the greatest jazz guitar books ever published


    ______________________


  16. #215

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    About 30 years ago I worked my way through roughly half of the first book with no real grasp of what I was doing. Just did the exercises and tried to get them to sound musical to me. Over the years the chords have been nice to have to hand, but I suspect that I still do not have the basic jazz background one should have before going into the books. :-(
    Having those major 6s and 7s under your belt sure makes it easier to play the intro for SRVs' "Lenny" though...

  17. #216

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    Get the "Jazz Bible" as well. It isn't a good guitar book, but reading through it to simply understand the theory at work is a big help when you start. Then, pick up a lot of music (or go on youtube) of jazz guitarists. I'm not that good on names, but others here can help you.

    It also helps to know what your goal in jazz is. For example, I want to be a competent rhythm guitarist and accompanist. So, doing a lot of work on solo theory isn't as beneficial to me as learning chord shapes, progressions, harmony, and bass theory. Once you start breaking your goals down, you can get some very specific ideas on what you need to study and books/teachers are everywhere for almost anything music.

    ~DB
    God is great, beer is good, people are crazy.

  18. #217

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    Thanks DB, When I get a chance, I'll try to get a copy of the book.
    I think it's just a matter of learning more jazz tunes. I've played blues and rock for a long time, but I took about a year of classical tutelage almost a decade ago. I had three tutors, one a composer, yet none of them even mentioned "transcribing". I've "written" a lot of music over the years and still can't actually write it down. ( lot's of basic stuff, but my twist on it ) I could probably cobble up a chord chart, but writing/transcribing isn't much in my skill set. I know more than a few songs that go beyond the basics, but still need to learn.
    I guess I know all these jokes because so many seem to apply to me!

    "How many blues bass players does it take to change the light bulb?"
    ...
    ...
    One
    ...
    Four
    ...
    Five
    ...
    One
    ...
    Four
    ...
    Five

    I'm not a bass player but... you get the idea.

    Now, here's my next question- Is II,V,I the jazz equivalent of I,IV,V? Is it usually the head or start of the tune? Another problem for me- I am familiar with the circle of 5ths / 4ths. I see how it's used in some tunes. (2 of the 3 I am working on have obvious examples of it's use- Bluesette and Autumn Leaves.) but I still don't really get how to jump on it, and then jump off in the process of playing. All of this speaks to my needing to learn a lot more jazz tunes.
    I have a book by Jerry Coker which is mostly jazz theory and again, without a background of the jazz basics, it's not only dry, but almost indecipherable for me. ( well, not quite, but not a page turner either... )
    Thank you for the feedback!
    Happy New Year!
    Last edited by WhoisLevang; 12-31-2010 at 09:00 PM. Reason: correction

  19. #218

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    Quote Originally Posted by WhoisLevang View Post
    Now, here's my next question- Is II,V,I the jazz equivalent of I,IV,V? Is it usually the head or start of the tune? Another problem for me- I am familiar with the circle of 5ths / 4ths. I see how it's used in some tunes. (2 of the 3 I am working on have obvious examples of it's use- Bluesette and Autumn Leaves.) but I still don't really get how to jump on it, and then jump off in the process of playing.
    1-6-2-5 more like it.

    1-6-2-5-1-6-2-5

    But this is simplistic.

    You need a good grounding in jazz chords and substitutions to make progress.

    My suggestion is Mickey Baker's Book 1. Get those chords and their uses under your fingers.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 01-01-2011 at 07:10 PM.

  20. #219

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    I'll add to what he said: 2-5-1's also modulate a lot. Which is why some charts will have a minor 1 chord in them. 6-2-5-1's and 2-5-1's are just so prevalent in Jazz that you really have to get those chord progressions in as many inversions and keys as possible under your fingers.

    Think about it like you can do G C G D without thinking, right? Figure the same for Em7 C7 Gmaj7.

    ~DB
    God is great, beer is good, people are crazy.

  21. #220

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    Is this the correct thread to ask lesson specific questions on the MB book?

    I am wondering how, in Lesson 3 Exercise 1, he comes up with the Bbmi7 sub for Gdim? Are the two chords related somehow, or is he just substituting the 'function' of the Gdim, a passing chord, for an equally effective passing chord in the Bbmi7 - both of them leading to an Ami(7) chord?

    Thanks.

  22. #221

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    Quote Originally Posted by TooSteep View Post
    Is this the correct thread to ask lesson specific questions on the MB book?

    I am wondering how, in Lesson 3 Exercise 1, he comes up with the Bbmi7 sub for Gdim? Are the two chords related somehow, or is he just substituting the 'function' of the Gdim, a passing chord, for an equally effective passing chord in the Bbmi7 - both of them leading to an Ami(7) chord?

    Thanks.
    The chords share two notes (Bb and Db) which is generally enough of a relationship to allow substitution.

    This sequence is found/works in the following songs:

    Song List of 1maj

  23. #222

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    Here's an example of that. Please excuse my sloppy playing, tone, digressions from subject, etc.


  24. #223

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Joyce View Post
    Hi Jazz Bug et al;

    I have been hosting a website called the "Advanced Guitar Study Group" which is based on Mickey's Vol 1.
    Best regards and good luck,
    Mike Joyce
    Wow Mike ... what a fabulous resource and incredible amount of work. And free, too. Many many thanks!

  25. #224

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    I ordered the Mickey Baker book and got a call yesterday that it's in. I'll pick it up today and get started. I had the book years ago and learned some of the chords and a few blues substitutions but I didn't delve into the material or keep at it. I intend to this time!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  26. #225
    Quote Originally Posted by billkath View Post
    I'm wondering how you'd do that? The mi7 to mi6 progression (chords 4 and 5 on lesson 1) doesn't use the pinky (just finger's 1,2 and 3). For the Maj7 to Maj6-It feels completely unnatural to anchor your pinky on 3rd string, 4 th fret-using Mickey's fingerings.

    Attachment 1728
    Hi Billy
    And thanks!

    I just bought the revised edition Of Mickey Bakers book!
    How about that chord #8 stretch, eh?
    Great to revisit this great resource
    Last edited by stratcat33511; 01-07-2011 at 07:37 PM.

  27. #226
    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbler View Post
    1-6-2-5 more like it.

    1-6-2-5-1-6-2-5

    But this is simplistic.

    You need a good grounding in jazz chords and substitutions to make progress.

    My suggestion is Mickey Baker's Book 1. Get those chords and their uses under your fingers.
    Nothing more timeless eh?
    One of my favorite progressions of all time
    50's anyone ?

  28. #227

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    I'm working through Lesson 4 right now and I noticed that you can chop of the lines a little bit that he gives you as substitutions and get most of the Rhythm Changes. It was kind of cool to finally see it there.

    ~DB
    God is great, beer is good, people are crazy.

  29. #228

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    Slowly but surely progressing here... Almost 2 years so far, but of course not 2 hours a day. 1/2 hour 2 or 3 times a week if I'm lucky. On lesson 15 at the moment (bridges), doing my homework on the non-C scales.

    One thing that I found useful for my practice was, before I start work on the current lesson, go through all the previous lessons in one or 2 scales. Good exercise for loosening up the fingers.

    (Actually, not *all* the previous lessons, just the 4 or 5 ones that are in different scales: chord progressing, intros, vamps.)

    By the way, I notice that when I play the Mickey Baker chords in the first 2 or 3 positions of the neck, I get a lot of low-end "rumble". Mostly when I play them on my nylon-string acoustic. Anybody else experience that?

    I was thinking (and dreading the prospect) of putting on some thicker strings. Currently I think I have medium gause ones. Hopefully that won't cause too much more neck bow...

  30. #229

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    I have a question about Lesson 24, Ex. 4. (It's the first lesson in Part Two of the first book, the beginning of picking / solo studies.)

    Exercise four begins with a quarter note triplet (-meaning two beats) followed by a eighth note triplet (one beat) and a quarter note (one beat). Great. But measure two has a beat of sixteenth notes, a quarter note triplet, and a quarter note---that's only 3 beats! Where's the other beat???? (The measures on either side have four beats.)

    Also, Ex 3 has three eighth note triplets in the second measure and that's all--it's a beat short! (The measures on either side of it have four beats.)

    What gives?
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  31. #230
    The sixteenths seem out of context with the rest of it. Making them (swinging) eighths makes musical sense as it ties it to the next measure as a motif.

    I think we need typo threads for a lot of these "standard" books. Definitely need one for the real book.

  32. #231

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    The sixteenths seem out of context with the rest of it. Making them (swinging) eighths makes musical sense as it ties it to the next measure as a motif.
    I thought so too, though I think Baker wants the exercises to mix rhythms so players can get used to handling them with simple melodic material (-in this case a scale.) But I have to think typo because it doesn't add up to four beats.

    In the next lesson, he mixes quarters and eighths, then sixteenths and thirty-seconds. That's a good picking exercise.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  33. #232
    Dear Mr. Markerhodes,

    RE: the error in Lesson 24, Exercise 4. Go to Mickey Baker, then to the Lessons Page and select Lesson 24. At this point you will need to download either TEFview (freeware) or TablEdit (shareware). Then download the exercises.

    One of my objectives to making my study notes available was to repair editing errors. The Vol 1 had a few errors. If you are an error counter, then you're going to be in for a treat in Vol 2 as it was filled with errors (that hopefully I found a suitable solution for you.)

    Good luck.

    Best regards,
    Mike

  34. #233

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Joyce View Post
    Dear Mr. Markerhodes, RE: the error in Lesson 24, Exercise 4. Go to Mickey Baker, then to the Lessons Page and select Lesson 24. At this point you will need to download either TEFview (freeware) or TablEdit (shareware). Then download the exercises.
    Thanks. I'll do that. I don't consider myself an "error counter"; I was wanting to make sure I was doing the exercise right.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  35. #234
    I have the new revised edition and it has the same thing.
    Does your version have a C for cut time in there ?
    Even then I think its wrongk
    But if its right then I'm wrong

  36. #235
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Joyce View Post
    Dear Mr. Markerhodes,

    RE: the error in Lesson 24, Exercise 4. Go to Mickey Baker, then to the Lessons Page and select Lesson 24. At this point you will need to download either TEFview (freeware) or TablEdit (shareware). Then download the exercises.

    One of my objectives to making my study notes available was to repair editing errors. The Vol 1 had a few errors. If you are an error counter, then you're going to be in for a treat in Vol 2 as it was filled with errors (that hopefully I found a suitable solution for you.)

    Good luck.

    Best regards,
    Mike
    Wow, wish I knew about this before. Great stuff, will be of huge help with my slow guitar playing progress.

    Thanks

  37. #236

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    Quote Originally Posted by stratcat33511 View Post
    I have the new revised edition and it has the same thing.Does your version have a C for cut time in there ?
    No, there's no time signature at all. By the way, I thought "C" stood for "common time" (4/4). But either way, there's no time signature.

    I was flipping through the book yesterday, looking at lessons to come and back over previous ones. I noticed the use of "course" for "chorus." That surprised me. I don't think Mickey was responsible for that!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  38. #237

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Joyce View Post
    ...RE: the error in Lesson 24, Exercise 4....
    Good evening, Mike...
    Could I be so bold as to ask you to look again at this tef file, please? I may be wrong (and there may be some interpretation in this...), but imho you've 'corrected' the first bar where there is no mistake. In my printed version, bar 1 starts with a crotchet triplet, then a quaver triplet, then a crotchet. You've changed to two successive quaver triplets, then a minim. Was there a reason for changing this, please?
    The following bar, where there is an original MB error, has been corrected oddly, too (still respectfully imho,of course...); personally I had corrected this by changing the semi-quavers for quavers, which gives the count required for the bar. I find it 'smoother' than your (technically correct...) version in which the last note is instead prolonged to a minim. Was there a reason for this choice, please?
    Not wishing to criticise, of course, simply curious to learn the logic behind your choices. Many thanks again for your great work.
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  39. #238

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    [QUOTE=Dad3353;130971 In my printed version, bar 1 starts with a crotchet triplet, then a quaver triplet, then a crotchet. You've changed to two successive quaver triplets, then a minim. Was there a reason for changing this, please?
    The following bar, where there is an original MB error, has been corrected oddly, too (still respectfully imho,of course...); personally I had corrected this by changing the semi-quavers for quavers, which gives the count required for the bar. I find it 'smoother' than your (technically correct...) version in which the last note is instead prolonged to a minim. [/QUOTE]

    Dad, I agree that the first measure was okay as it was. Playing that page today, I thought that the second measure is okay too in the sense Micky intended it: by keeping the sixteenths, you have *all* the main note values in one line. I think the exercise is intended to make you juggle lots of different rhythms in a single line. (Granted, he could've written it out "correctly" but he didn't and where's the harm? I was initially confused because I wasn't sure I was reading the *first* measure right. I got down a book to check the difference between quarter-note-triplets and eighth-note-triplets. Satisfied that I had indeed read them right, I took the suggestion of playing the 16ths in measure two as eights. That makes for four beats total, but there is an eight note pair in the following measure (-but no sixteenths), so I decided to play it as written and forget about the missing beat. It's a real good exercise in juggling rhythms.

    My 2 cents.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  40. #239
    Hi guys,

    I did indeed change measure 1 of Exercise 4 when the rhythm is correct. The triple quarters seem to be out of place with the rest of Lesson 24 that I assumed it must have been an error. I also agree with you that making the 16th notes in measure 2 of that exercise as 1/8th's is a better choice than making the final note a 1/2 note.

    Give me a couple of days and I'll revise that TEF.

    Thanks for your help.

    Best regards,
    Mike

  41. #240
    Hi all,

    Per the suggestions of Dad3353 and Markerhodes, Lesson 24 has been revised. The changes include making Lesson 24 "24(REV)" on the Lesson Page, editing the Notes to Lesson 24, editing Exercise 4 of that lesson and re-zipping everything.

    Thanks for your help.

    Best regards,
    Mike

  42. #241

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael_Joyce View Post
    Per the suggestions of Dad3353 and Markerhodes, Lesson 24 has been revised. The changes include making Lesson 24 "24(REV)" on the Lesson Page, editing the Notes to Lesson 24, editing Exercise 4 of that lesson and re-zipping everything.
    I'm impressed with all your work at that site. I worked out of Mickey's book years ago in a slapdash fashion; this year I'm working through it steadily. (The one concession I allow myself is to work in Part One and Part Two simultaneously, which is why I'm on Lessons 24 and 3 at the same time!) And when I say steadily, I mean I mark my trouble spots with a pencil and keep working on them until I get them right.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  43. #242

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    I hereby nominate Mike Joyce for 'Hero Of the Day'.



    Such abnegation..! Total respect.
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  44. #243

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    I've spent a lot of time in Mickey's book this past week. I mean away from the guitar stand. I took it to a park with some manuscript paper and transposed exercises to different keys for practice. As a reward, I looked ahead to see what was coming. I found another use of "course" for "chorus." (I'm NOT complaining about this. I wouldn't change it if I could. It's part of the book and I'm good with that, though I think that wasn't Mickey's miscue. But I also found a use of "revue" for "review" and wondered if that might not be Mickey's error, given that he probably played his share of "revue" shows. Again, I'm not complaining. It gives me a chuckle. I've had things published and found typos I missed while proofreading; it happens to the best of 'em, and me too.)

    The only mistakes I care about are the ones that leave me unsure what to play (or how to play it.) I'm glad we had that great exchange about Lesson 24--we put our heads together and came up with a reasonable interpretation of the text. (Forgive me, but I spent time in a seminary: poring over texts is something I like to do, though they are now musical rather than biblical texts.)
    That was perfect. That's what the forum is about for me--getting insights from others, putting in my own 2 cents when I can raise it.

    But that said, I get a kick out of curious usage. And I also smile whenever I read Mickey's suggestion to play the chords and hum the lines over them---he wrote long before play-along recordings, much less BiaB. Heck, when he wrote, cassette recorders were probably pricey.

    And in conclusion, long live Mickey!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  45. #244

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    Hello Jazz Lovers,
    I got the Mickey Baker book a couple of weeks ago. I've had the Arnie Berle book "Chords & Progressions for Jazz & Popular Guitar" for many years and have spent a lot of time with my head in that book. So, I have known many, but not all, of the original 26 chords. Getting going has been pretty quick and I've gotten through the first 10 lessons pretty easily. I got out some staff paper, lined up my measures, and wrote out the changes in lesson 5 in Ab, Bb and F as assigned. I'm now working on lesson 11 and I'm feeling pretty comfortable. I'm going to follow Mike Joyce's suggestion of writing out these exercises in the 'guitar friendly' keys as well. I've also been reading Michael Joyce's lessons on his website.
    Michael - your lessons are a very helpful addition to the material that Mickey has written. It's clear that you love to teach this material and you love to play jazz guitar too.
    Thank You for doing all of that work so that others may learn.
    Jamie Peghiny

  46. #245

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    Holy &*#%! Thanks for bumping this thread. I had no idea it existed. Just placed an order from Amazon.

  47. #246

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    Can't believe I missed this thread for so long.

    I made a number of videos of exercises in this book, which might be a help for some of you.

    Mickey Baker Jazz Guitar Rob MacKillop ~ banjos, guitars, lutes and more

  48. #247

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    Rob,
    Yes, I've seen them and they're most helpful.
    Jamie

  49. #248
    Hi Jamie et al:

    A heartfelt thank you for the kind words. I'm sorry it's taken me so long to respond. I'd forgotten my password. This morning, on a lark, I decided to see if my older computer had the password in its memory. What a happy discovery!

    Although I originally organized my Mickey Baker notes to help some folks in another forum wishing to learn a few more chords, I didn't receive much feedback until I posted on this forum. Since then, I've had many, many emails with thanks, questions, material to add to the site, corrections, and just to meet me as a fellow addict. Because Dirk has a commercial part to this forum, I've tried not to "rusty the strings" by keeping posts about my purely amateur efforts to a minimum.

    This year in general and recently specifically, I have revised and updated some of the lessons. Upon finishing the posting of the original 52 lessons from Mickey's Volume 1, I decided to add 6 appendices. 1 (Arranging for a Small Group), 2 (Comping with three note chords), 3 (Melody chord comping), and 6 (all the lessons from Mickey's Volume 2), have been added and are available. 4 (Rhythms other than 4/4) and 5 (an archive of papers I've written on the guitar) are under construction, with 5 being released shortly.

    I contacted Rob MacKillop some time back about adding links to his videos in the lessons. He graciously gave me permission to do so. I haven't started that yet, but it's on the "Mickey-Do" list. I want to thank him for the hard work and great effort he's put into his project.

    Since my initial post on this forum, I've received quite a few questions about Mickey and the course. As of yesterday, one can find "Before You Begin....." with many of those same questions and my attempts to answer and explain them. If you're a regular to the website, you may have to refresh your browser and you can go to that page from a link on the Home page.

    I've never tried to pass myself off as a expert, either of Mickey's courses or of Jazz guitar. But having the website has made me privy to hundreds of opinions. Because I'm not selling any course or book, I can be a lot more honest (tough love) about what I've received. The #1 opinion is that it's OK to "Cherry Pick". By that, I mean, scour the books and look for interesting lessons, rather than start with Lesson 1 and work until the end of the book. I don't wish to criticize, as we all have our personal agendas. But I can say that if your goal is to get as much from the course as possible and actually finish it, avoid cherry picking. A number of ambitious students have said "I'm doing the Part 1 (Accompanying) and Part 2 (Soloing) at the same time." This also, I believe, is counterproductive for the vast majority of students. Mickey is trying to "burn into memory" (an expression that certainly post dates 1955!) harmonic structures. If a student doesn't have these foundations, how can he be expected to create interesting solos? Well, I know I sure couldn't. If one reads posts like "there's lots of courses out there better than Mickey's", he can make a sure bet the writer is a Cherry Picker. Due to the 64 page limitation of Volume 1, Mickey infers and the student discovers from the layering of the lessons so much that will never be found by cherry picking. I stand by my opinion that Mickey's Volume 1 is the most powerful 64-page text book I have ever read on any subject.

    My favorite lesson in his Volume 1 is Lesson 17. That's where he says to take this newly acquired harmonic knowledge and try to re-harmonize standards. To my way way of thinking, this is an exercise we guitarists will be doing until the ends of our playing days. I could, if not write a book, at least fill a large chapter on the excuses I've received for not doing this lesson as Mickey asks. None will be as tough as the first, and they get progressively easier after that. I had more fun creating this lesson's notes for the website than any other. And I still harmonize standards, if not daily, certainly weekly.

    One last comment: my home is in Asunción, Paraguay. Due to government bureaucracy, I was having a devil of a time getting permission to create the site. Some friends in the Texas Fingerstyle Guitar Association, donated webspace for this course. Without their help, this site would not have been possible as early as it was. In the near future I have plans to move it to my own webspace. So from time to time, check in here to receive the notification.

    Good luck to all no matter who or what they're studying.

    Mike

    Mickey Baker

  50. #249

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    You got a hell of a resource at that site Mike. Thanks for putting it up. I plan on starting in Baker very soon and have you bookmarked when the time comes. Thanks again.

  51. #250

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    You got a hell of a resource at that site Mike. Thanks for putting it up. I plan on starting in Baker very soon and have you bookmarked when the time comes. Thanks again.
    Maybe another record your way through the book study group?