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  1. #151

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    Hi, I'm back to working on the M. Baker method again after a year or so of absence from the instrument. Half an hour a day more or less. Just as a hobby of course...

    Just started mixing it up with a bit of the "Music reading for guitar" every practice session, so when I reach the 2nd part of the book I'm not too lost with having to read charts.

    One of my main issues also is lack of repertoire, so I'm thinking of buying some book of standards. There is this "Swingin' Jazz Guitar" book by Alfred that looks promising -- it has all chord shapes spelled out, which should be good for a newbie like me. Later on I guess I can "graduate" to the Real Book.

    Really enjoying getting back into the Baker Method... it's like getting a brand new guitar.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

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    I've only been going through book one for a little bit (up to lesson 4 this week). It can be a huge pain.

    I guess I assumed there was a book two but never really thought about it. Anyone got some insight of what to expect (years from now when I am ready)?

    ~DB

  4. #153

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    @ Hernandinho:
    Get the Real Book. If you stick with the Mickey Baker book, you'll learn the chords that voice many of the tunes in the Real Book. Not that they go together, but you can make them go together in that way.

  5. #154

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    I've only been going through book one for a little bit (up to lesson 4 this week). It can be a huge pain.

    I guess I assumed there was a book two but never really thought about it. Anyone got some insight of what to expect (years from now when I am ready)?

    ~DB
    Good evening, lindydanny...
    Book II is complementary to I, we start off looking at 'moving notes' within a chord, and leading to another chord, to join them up. Chord/Melody is introduced, Cadence, symetrical cycles, intros and endings, resolutions, pedal point and counterpoint.
    The subjects are covered in a rather summary manner (not too deeply, nor too long, just enough to get one started...), and examples throughout illustrate. One is encouraged (indeed, it's the whole point...) to develop and work out/improvise one's own application of the principles shown.
    Not too much heavy theory (40 pages in all...), but quite a lot of work to do the whole thing.
    I find it gives a break from Book I, but I've not got too far (in 40 years..!) in applying to my play, but I certainlty appreciate reading through it regularly.
    In all, perhaps not indispensable, but I'm a nostalgic old b***** and I've bought it again every time I've lost it.
    Hope this helps...
    (I stll maintain that it's all down to luck (mutters off into the distance, slams door...)
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  6. #155

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    There's enough in Mickey Baker Book 1 to last many, many years.

    But hardly anyone here gets through more than a few lessons.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 11-02-2010 at 07:40 AM.

  7. #156

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    I'm on lesson 23 this week. Next week I'm spending the whole week going through all the lessons in part 1 again, right from lesson 2. Then it's on to the great unknown! bought book 2 at the same time. When I started lesson 2 I put the 2nd book into a plastic sleeve, knowing that it'll be a year till I get to it!

  8. #157

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    I just started lesson 4 this week. I have a little bit of a beef with the last exercise which is the only two line exercise in the lesson and just happens to spill over to the next page. Oh, well. I should be scribing this all to a piece of notation paper anyway!

    A quick question: Does anyone have a breakdown of what song examples use the "Standard" lines that we are supposed to be subbing the "New" lines for?

    ~DB

  9. #158

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    The truth is even though I made it through the whole book, I'm still going back and going over past lessons.

    There's a lot of stuff in there that makes much more sense once you've gone over it and applied it to actual playing.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 08-31-2010 at 10:03 AM.

  10. #159

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    A quick question: Does anyone have a breakdown of what song examples use the "Standard" lines that we are supposed to be subbing the "New" lines for?

    ~DB
    You'll find those chord sequences in just about every jazz standard out there.

    2-5-1 is in every song:

    [Dm] - [G7 ] - [Cmajor] - [%] = [Dm7 - Dm6] - [Dm7 - G13] - [CM7 - Ebm7] - [Dm7 - G13]
    Last edited by Drumbler; 08-31-2010 at 10:14 AM.

  11. #160

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    A quick question: Does anyone have a breakdown of what song examples use the "Standard" lines that we are supposed to be subbing the "New" lines for?

    ~DB
    lindydanny...
    You might like to look at the Vanilla Book, wonderfully put into 'web' format by Ralph Patt...

    Ralph Patt's Jazz Web Page

    ...which I find very useful for answering just that question. The Real Books have, for the most part, the subs already in place; the Vanilla Book shows only the base chords, it's up to you to sub as required.
    There is, on Ralph's site, a very useful index to 'Tonal Centres', which 'finds' in the tunes the particular shift interesting us, and shows where they are in the tune. For instance, for...
    I - IIm7 - IIIm7 - IIm7
    ... we find...
    Foggy Day, IT MIGHT AS WELL BE SPRING...
    ...for ...
    I - IIm7 - IIIm7 - bIIIdim
    ... we get ...
    I COVER THE WATERFRONT, STARS FELL ON ALABAMA
    ...and so on. The matching passages are high-lit in Yellow, putting the passage in context.
    Try it, it may help make more 'sense' when applying the MB substitutions.
    Hope this helps (and thanks awefully, Ralph Patt...)
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  12. #161

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad3353 View Post
    lindydanny...
    You might like to look at the Vanilla Book, wonderfully put into 'web' format by Ralph Patt...

    Ralph Patt's Jazz Web Page
    Thanks for pointing that out. That's a great resource!

  13. #162

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    Yeah, thanks for the link to Vanilla Book.

    ~DB

  14. #163

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hernandinho View Post
    Hi, I'm back to working on the M. Baker method again after a year or so of absence from the instrument. Half an hour a day more or less. Just as a hobby of course...

    Just started mixing it up with a bit of the "Music reading for guitar" every practice session, so when I reach the 2nd part of the book I'm not too lost with having to read charts.

    One of my main issues also is lack of repertoire, so I'm thinking of buying some book of standards. There is this "Swingin' Jazz Guitar" book by Alfred that looks promising -- it has all chord shapes spelled out, which should be good for a newbie like me. Later on I guess I can "graduate" to the Real Book.

    Really enjoying getting back into the Baker Method... it's like getting a brand new guitar.
    Do you have a link to the "Swingin' Jazz Guitar" book by Alfred? Is it: Amazon.com: Just for Fun: Swingin' Jazz Guitar (9780739064689): Alfred Publishing Staff: Books ?

  15. #164

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    Quote Originally Posted by Papadoc View Post
    @ Hernandinho:
    Get the Real Book. If you stick with the Mickey Baker book, you'll learn the chords that voice many of the tunes in the Real Book. Not that they go together, but you can make them go together in that way.
    Good point; I think I'll go through the songs in the easier book first; then I will go for the Real Book.

    Also there is the issue of the Real Book tunes being already re-harmonized. I'm sure figuring out the Vanilla chords for the tunes (either by myself or by comparing the Real and Vanilla books) will be yet another interesting challenge.

  16. #165

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stylemaster View Post
    Do you have a link to the "Swingin' Jazz Guitar" book by Alfred? Is it: Amazon.com: Just for Fun: Swingin' Jazz Guitar (9780739064689): Alfred Publishing Staff: Books ?
    Yes, I just ordered it the other day, thanks

  17. #166

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    Quote Originally Posted by DennisW View Post
    Hello cats, when I learnt about the Mickey Baker's method, I ordered my copy straight away. Apparently you're supposed to learn a few things about substituting chords which shows when you go as far as lesson 3 I think it is. Anyway, when you check its first progression, Mickey substitutes his
    G | Gdim | Am D7

    with

    Gmaj7 Gmaj6 | B-7 Bb-7 | Am-7 D13b5b9

    But I don't really understand why you can sub your diminished I chord with B-7 and Bb-7 in this case.
    I haven't read through pages 3, 4 and 5 of this thread so I'm not sure if someone's already said what I'm about to say (I have seen Michael Joyce's reply though mine will be a little more direct).

    Basically, this is a classic iii for I substitution. The Gdim was just adding some sense of "movement" to the classic G | G | Am | D7 progression (i.e. I | I | ii | V). Check out the tune "It's Only a Paper Moon" - it uses the G | Gdim | Am | D7 progression too, and again I think the Gdim is just acting as a spiced-up version of G.

  18. #167

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    Well I just received Mickey's Book 1 along with Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions in the mail yesterday and read through the introductions to both (not much intro in Mickey's book though). My initial thought on Book 1 is that I surely will need to get plugged into the related web site that has been mentioned earlier in this thread. My thought on Ted's book is two fold: 1) "holy cow" look at all those chord diagrams...I know we eat an elephant one bite at a time but this is a heard and I only have a toothpick! 2) very disappointed when I read "the progressions in this book were geared to be played without a flat pick". Time for a refund. I have tried finger picking which is why I use a pick. Are there any chord progression books out there that are geared to flat picking?
    Thanks for the forum...I'll be asking questions I'm sure as I labor through.
    Tom

  19. #168

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    Quote Originally Posted by TJLewis View Post
    Well I just received Mickey's Book 1 along with Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions in the mail yesterday and read through the introductions to both (not much intro in Mickey's book though). My initial thought on Book 1 is that I surely will need to get plugged into the related web site that has been mentioned earlier in this thread. My thought on Ted's book is two fold: 1) "holy cow" look at all those chord diagrams...I know we eat an elephant one bite at a time but this is a heard and I only have a toothpick! 2) very disappointed when I read "the progressions in this book were geared to be played without a flat pick". Time for a refund. I have tried finger picking which is why I use a pick. Are there any chord progression books out there that are geared to flat picking?
    Thanks for the forum...I'll be asking questions I'm sure as I labor through.
    Tom
    Hi,

    I went through Mickey Baker's book decades ago. I especially like the moveability and voicings. I use it a lot on Bossa Nova and find it very easy to apply my own altered chords. I always liked the 1642 grip anyway. The web site using Telview is OK, but I find that the book itself was all I needed and already had before the site was started. Follow the book and you can't go wrong IMHO. Good Luck!

  20. #169

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    Quote Originally Posted by TJLewis View Post
    Well I just received Mickey's Book 1 along with Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions in the mail yesterday and read through the introductions to both (not much intro in Mickey's book though). My initial thought on Book 1 is that I surely will need to get plugged into the related web site that has been mentioned earlier in this thread. My thought on Ted's book is two fold: 1) "holy cow" look at all those chord diagrams...I know we eat an elephant one bite at a time but this is a heard and I only have a toothpick! 2) very disappointed when I read "the progressions in this book were geared to be played without a flat pick". Time for a refund. I have tried finger picking which is why I use a pick. Are there any chord progression books out there that are geared to flat picking?
    Thanks for the forum...I'll be asking questions I'm sure as I labor through.
    Tom
    I've had Mickey Baker's book for somewhere between 30-40 years and I still haven't gotten past lesson 2. I'm pathetic. I subscribe to this great thread and I still can't get it together to commit to this. However, I also bought another book a long time ago that I also saw mentioned on this thread that would be perfect for you (and me if I'd bother to open it). It's "Jazz Rhythm Guitar - A systematic Approach to Chord Progressions" by Roger Edison published by Alfred. I just did a search and found it's out of print but you can buy a used one on Amazon or $9.50 or you can view or download the whole thing on the web at Jazz Rhythm Guitar - A Sytematic Approach to Chord Progressions.

    There's also a thread on here: https://www.jazzguitar.be/forum/every...itar-help.html

    Let me know what you think. Maybe it will help me get off my arse and do something.

  21. #170

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    Quote Originally Posted by pauljoey View Post
    Hi,

    I went through Mickey Baker's book decades ago. I especially like the moveability and voicings. I use it a lot on Bossa Nova and find it very easy to apply my own altered chords. I always liked the 1642 grip anyway. The web site using Telview is OK, but I find that the book itself was all I needed and already had before the site was started. Follow the book and you can't go wrong IMHO. Good Luck!
    Typo.....Should be 6432 grip...DUH!!!

  22. #171

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    TJ,

    As it has been stated before, take it one lesson a week. Obviously, you can probably get by with skipping to lesson two in MB's book for the first week, but keep putting your fingers around those chords on that sheet every week!!! Eventually, they will catch up with you.

    I'm up to lesson 6 and the chords used there for chord melody are killing me. I didn't keep my fingers around the chords in the first lesson throughout and now I am paying the price.

    ~DB

  23. #172

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    Quote Originally Posted by TJLewis View Post
    Well I just received Mickey's Book 1 along with Ted Greene's Modern Chord Progressions in the mail yesterday and read through the introductions to both (not much intro in Mickey's book though). My initial thought on Book 1 is that I surely will need to get plugged into the related web site that has been mentioned earlier in this thread. My thought on Ted's book is two fold: 1) "holy cow" look at all those chord diagrams...I know we eat an elephant one bite at a time but this is a heard and I only have a toothpick! 2) very disappointed when I read "the progressions in this book were geared to be played without a flat pick". Time for a refund. I have tried finger picking which is why I use a pick. Are there any chord progression books out there that are geared to flat picking?
    Thanks for the forum...I'll be asking questions I'm sure as I labor through.
    Tom
    A lot of Ted's chords can be played with a flat pick, or with a combination of pick and fingers (hybrid).

    The best advice anyone can give you for getting into Ted's stuff is this: click here!
    Build bridges, not walls.

  24. #173

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    Giving up on Ted's material would be doing yyourself a major disservice. Ted is one of the greatest teachers of all time, and if you stick with it you can learn the material in his books. Think about it this way, if you are able to pick up one thing, one new chord voicing, one new technique than your efforts are worth it! I have three of Ted's books (Chord Chemistry, Modern Chord Progressions, and Single Note Soloing Vol1) I know they seem like a lot (Because they are) but the work you put in there will be well worth it!!!

  25. #174

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    My suggestion with the Baker book is to have a few standards that you are familiar with the tune of and relate the lessons to the songs. I know he has those rote-learning things like "Gma7 Gma6 Am7 Am6, then Abma7 Abma6.......etc" A song like Out of Nowhere, or I'm Confessin', or Aint Misbehavin' will incorporate all those changes and can be played with the first half-page of chords.

    I just find that a more interesting way to learn. There are others which can produce a pretty good chord melody with even the most basic Mickey chrods: Darn that Dream, As Time goes By, Do nothin' till you hear from me. I'm beginning to see the Light.

  26. #175

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    Thanks guys for the helpful info and personal experiences. Wish I had seen Edison's book sooner...downloaded a handful of initial pages to go through. Thanks again...I'll be keeping up with the forum.
    Tom

  27. #176

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    I confirm two points.

    *the book Jazz Rhythm Guitar - A systematic Approach to Chord Progressions" by Roger Edison is a great book.

    *The lesson 6 is terrible .
    I can play the sequences, but I just can memorize them all.

    Personnally, I am stuck on the lesson 10, just because I don't practise enough with the method. I also have fun doing some improvisation with pentatonic scales with blues backtracks and my looper JM4.

    Blues is also Jazz after all !
    Ibanez AF125 AMB is a nice guitar. I feel better everyday !

  28. #177

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    Quote Originally Posted by manu68 View Post
    I confirm two points.

    *the book Jazz Rhythm Guitar - A systematic Approach to Chord Progressions" by Roger Edison is a great book.

    !
    I'm downloading it and priniting it off as we speak. It would be great if it came with a cd to hear the progressions etc. I'm going on the search for Mickey's course now that I've got my credit card sorted out

  29. #178

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    Quote Originally Posted by manu68 View Post
    *The lesson 6 is terrible .
    I concur. It doesn't help that I'm on hold with playing for house repairs and for a bluegrass jam weekend coming up!

    ~DB

  30. #179

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    I concur. It doesn't help that I'm on hold with playing for house repairs and for a bluegrass jam weekend coming up!

    ~DB
    Worry not, lads-it becomes easy. You're just learning the chords, getting those shapes into your fingers,remember? When you go back over this in a few weeks time you'll say "Man-can't believe I strugggled with this". Keep at it.

  31. #180

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    That's how I feel about lesson two now!!!

    ~DB

  32. #181

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    New here...glad I found this place!

    Started on Mickey's book 1 a couple of months ago...I am going through the book all the way first (currently at Lesson 39) to get the idea and practice reading, and now I am going back and starting the 'homework' (I have the transpositions done for Lesson 5, and finishing Lesson 6)...but, I had a question:

    Everything makes sense in the book so far except, does anyone know why he would have us know the examples in Lesson 4 "by heart"? (I understand memorizing the melodic chord examples, chord substitution theory, and the runs and riffs in later Lessons, and sight reading the chords are not a problem)...just curious on this Lesson...

    By the way, I took private lessons from a teacher once, I asked him to teach me Jazz Harmony and he taught me a bunch of songs, but I never learned the harmony. This book is exactly what I wanted to learn--the chord subs, the run motifs--I am really happy with this find. Finally learning Jazz! (beyond just running modes over chords)...

  33. #182

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    Also, quick thanks to Michael Joyce: it was his website that lead me to the book and to this post forum. He really did some work at his site and it a great resource!

  34. #183

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    Hi Stratluvsvm and welcome. I think he just wants you to know the basic stuff withou having to think about it. With Lesson 4 you should be able to play practically every 2nd song from the 1930s and 40s. Remember that Mickey wrote that book in the 50s and those songs were still the bread and butter of the working musician.

    When you start working out your own chord melodies, those basic changes will be extremely useful, although by then you may be using some more adventurous inversions.

  35. #184

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    @ Banksia: that makes sense, thanks, I wouldn't have thought of that on my own. Also helps me to fill in another puzzle piece about the history of jazz, of which I am interested. Thanks again.

  36. #185
    Hi to all,

    First of all, a million thanks for all the kind words and support. Since my first post on this forum, the amount of email I receive for the Mickey Baker Lessons has exploded. Actually, I feel a little guilty as the MB Lessons site is completely noncommercial (except for buying Mickey's book) and I really don't want to be in conflict with commercial sites.

    A little update:

    Please note, along with updating the original lessons, I've added three of the six proposed appendices:

    1. Intro to Arranging, including Mickey's standard riffs transposed for bass.
    2. Modern Comping (converting Mickey's chords to 3-note comping chords)
    3. Melody Chords (useful for comping behind bass/tenor instruments)

    Due to the overwhelming amount of requests, I have started work on putting Mickey's Vol. 2 into the course format. As the philosophy of that volume is so different from Vol. 1, it's been a bit difficult. So far I have 11 lessons completed. When all 24 are ready, I'll put them into Appendix 6. When I worked on Vol 1's lessons, I had 50 test students checking my work, looking for the "got-cha's". I don't have that luxury for Volume 2, so I'm counting on your patience, keen eyes and ears, and feedback for that help.

    Appendices 4 and 5 are in the "To Be Determined" category as I write. I'm pretty much set on Appendix 4 being on playing Latin tunes, and less common meters. If you'll remember, Mickey doesn't even on into 3/4 time in Vol. 1, so that along with 5/4 will be addressed.

    Appendix 5 is so far totally open. My #1 idea is an intro to going from pick style to fingerstyle, but that isn't cast in concrete and am totally open to suggestions.

    One additional update to the site that is under development, is a dedication of my notes to each of the original 52 lessons to pioneer jazz guitarists, many well known and also a good many not so well known by name, but known as part of a pioneering jazz group. Needless to say, the entire course's notes and appendices will be dedicated to Mickey.

    Once again, a million thanks for your support and encouragement.

    Best regards,
    Mike

    Mickey Baker
    Last edited by Michael_Joyce; 12-10-2010 at 10:06 AM.

  37. #186

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    Lesson 23 has two to four bar chord sequences from various standard tunes.

    But what tunes?

    You can go to Ralph Patt's excellent site and find the tunes these sequences go to on his "tonal centers" page.

    The Tonal Centers Page
    Last edited by Drumbler; 12-14-2010 at 10:32 AM.

  38. #187

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    Just wanted to say that I've enjoyed reading this thread! Having recently started studying jazz guitar it helped me determine a good beginner method. I've just begun using this book almost exclusively (I picked up a real book as well). While I'm still working on the chords, I'm looking forward to contributing my own perspective on this method as it comes along. It seems like it's going to be a very solid entrance into jazz guitar.

  39. #188

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    Hi guys!

    I guess this is where I de-lurk and introduce myself as I seem to be on the Mickey Baker bandwagon.

    I first picked up a guitar just over 20 years ago and have been struggling with it ever since. I was always heavily into rock, metal and blues (still am) but have developed an appreciation for jazz in the last couple of years. Like many I suppose, I learned the barre and cowboy chords and a couple of blues scales, and thought that would be enough to make me a musician.

    I've come back to guitar after a few years break and want to learn to play it properly. I've just started with the Mickey Baker book 1 (just moved on to lesson 3), I have access to most of the Aebersold volumes and some real books. I'll be hooking up with a teacher in the new year at a local music academy and ideally I'd like to end up in a band.

    I look forward to interacting with you as I progress, and I have a question to start with. My musical theory is only around the first couple of ABRSM grades, but I can't for the life of me figure out why the D13b5b9 is so called. I see a G# on the low E and D# on the A but neither of these are obviously root notes. If this will become clear at some point in the future, then that's fine.

    Steve

    PS I read the explanation on the thumbpicker site, but it's still over my head at the moment!
    Last edited by BigSteve; 12-20-2010 at 02:36 PM. Reason: Clarification

  40. #189

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    Welcome, Big Steve. I had similar problems with the D13. It really is a D chord. It is just a different inversion and color than you are used to. I don't want to get too technical, but think of it as a D with a G# as the bass note and colored up so much that there was no room for the D anymore. Eventually, you'll get a Gmaj7 slid in there (later lesson) and it will make a bit more sense.

    ~DB
    God is great, beer is good, people are crazy.

  41. #190

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    Better off to start thinking about it as an Ab as soon as possible and to recognize the flat 5 interval whenever you see it, because it's quite important (the tritone).

    On dominant chords (D7, D9, D13) you can always raise or sharp the 5. The 5 of D is A, so you can have Ab or A# and they can very easily be in the bass. In a band, the bass player will often play that note to help get a smooth line between chords.

    I'm not sure if Mickey ever delves into chord analysis in Vol 1 so just memorize the voicing using whatever trick works best for you.

  42. #191

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSteve View Post
    why the D13b5b9 is so called. I see a G# on the low E and D# on the A but neither of these are obviously root notes
    Good evening, BigSteve, and welcome to the forum...
    I'll explain what I can of this chord; be warned that I'm far from expert, but here's how I see it (and have played it for the past 40+ years...)...
    The 'root' can be found on the 4th string (open, it's a 'D'...), but wouldn't normally be played, as the chord would no longer be movable. If you had used the 'b' sign instead of '#', you could have noticed that the G# is Ab (that's the b5...), and the D# is Eb (that's the b9...). The 13 is the B on the first string. There is no 5 or 11. The root is not necessary for this chord, bassist or not, at least in the context used by MB. It functions as a D7, leading to G, in 'straight' chords. You can hear this by playing firstly...
    Amin, D7, GMaj (standard ii, V7, I...)
    ...then...
    Amin7, D13b5b9, GMaj7. (decorated ii, V7, I...).
    ...the resolution to G is more sophisticated, that's all. The bass string has a nice descending 'A, Ab, G' this way.
    If there are errors in this, then I'm happy to stand corrected.
    Hope this helps.
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  43. #192

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    some would say its better to either call it a D7b5b9 or D13+11, b9

  44. #193

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    Keep in mind that it's impossible to play a full 13th type chord on guitar, since it would require 7 notes and you only have 6 strings. Notes must be excluded - the most common excluded notes are the root and the 5th. The D13b5b9 voicing in the Mickey Baker book excludes the root.

  45. #194

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    Wow, thanks for all the generous explanations folks!
    I kind of understand the reasoning but I expect it'll make more sense when I start to use it in practical applications.
    I have a lifetime (what's left of it) of learning ahead, so look out for more questions.

    Thanks again, I look forward to engaging with this community more soon!

    Steve

  46. #195

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    Steve,

    I'd also suggest at least reading the first two chapters of the book Swing & Big Band Guitar by Charlton Johnson. It is a rhythm book more than a jazz book, however it explains a ton on the how and why of three note and four note voicings. In particular, he goes into what voicings work best with what ensembles (duos, trios, orchestras, etc.). Well worth the money.

    ~DB
    Last edited by lindydanny; 12-21-2010 at 12:16 PM. Reason: added link for book
    God is great, beer is good, people are crazy.

  47. #196

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    Just received my copy today. Looking forward to digging in!

  48. #197

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    I'd also suggest at least reading the first two chapters of the book Swing & Big Band Guitar by Charlton Johnson.
    Looks interesting, thanks.
    I just ordered a copy.

  49. #198

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    Steve,

    I'd also suggest at least reading the first two chapters of the book Swing & Big Band Guitar by Charlton Johnson. It is a rhythm book more than a jazz book, however it explains a ton on the how and why of three note and four note voicings. In particular, he goes into what voicings work best with what ensembles (duos, trios, orchestras, etc.). Well worth the money.

    ~DB

    I just started with this one, but it seems to be a wonderful book for sorting out chords. A fine supplement to the Mickey Baker Method.

  50. #199

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    Quote Originally Posted by lindydanny View Post
    ...I'd also suggest at least reading the first two chapters of the book Swing & Big Band Guitar by Charlton Johnson....
    Amazon must be scratching their heads right now (why does everyone suddenly want this for Christmas..? ); my copy will be delivered in the next few days.
    (booming doom-laden tone: 'It had better be darned good, lindydanny, or... [fill here with preferred unpleasant inflictions...]' )
    Have a nice day

    Dad3353 (Douglas...)

  51. #200

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    Started on Lesson 2 last night. Really dig his approach!

    I almost sounded like I was playing jazz by the time I got to the last example. Now that's sayin' something!