Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Posts 51 to 100 of 416
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    If you aim to become a pro, talk to m78w or Jake O'Hanlon. They are both Music Academics at the tertiary level and they could tell you which texts they use in teaching.

    Coming from a rock background the easiest way to come in is via Kenny Burrell or the bluesier Herb Ellis albums. You can find a few tabs (with standard notation) for KB and Pass on 911tabs.com.

    I think Mickey is too elementary for where you're aiming. Holdsworth and McLaughlin are a bit "too individual" for starting points. I'd suggest something more generic. The Jody Fisher books are highly recommended (I've never used them but I've seen him play and if he could teach me that, I'd be happy)

    If you want something really deep, Bill Evans was a fan of the George Russell book "Lydian Chromatic Concept of Tonal Organisation" and there's my old fall-back "Fundamentals of Musical Composition" by Arnold Schoenberg.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    Thanks for your replies Banksia. What I feel I really need is a little push in the right direction towards improvisation. I know that learning tunes is the best way, but when I do that I learn the melody and the chord progression as two seperate things and its hard for me to relate the two because the harmony in the chords are so overwhelming. Its such a different world from rock and blues because I'm used to everything being in the same key for long periods of time where it seems in jazz I just stumble all over the place and lose myself.
    Last edited by silvatm; 04-07-2009 at 01:08 AM.

  4. #53

    User Info Menu

    When I first tried to play jazz I used to play along with some fairly simple songs like old Billie Holiday stuff and some bluesy Burrell stuff. I ignored the theory and just tried to solo according to my ear. I didn't care what key or chords they were playing. If the line sounds right, it IS right. You can always find theory later to explain what you're doing.

    Another good exercise was playing along with albums that have no guitar on them. That way you have to write the guitar part. Two good ones for this are Kind of Blue by Miles and Head Hunters by Herbie Hancock. Both have long tracks which are merely tonal shells and the melodies are really just suggestions for soloing ideas. On the Herbie one you will hear him play over a chord pattern in four or five different modal approaches and they all work. Bitches Brew is a good album for this approach as well.

    In jazz you are allowed to "stumble all over the place and lose yourself." The real crime in jazz is when you don't try to do anything adventurous.

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    I have experienced a sort of religious conversion with this new book now. My new answer to all questions lies in two words: Garrison Fewell!!

  6. #55
    Hey, I'm new here and have been working with the Mickey Baker book and Michael Joyce's site. Very helpful in understanding the book.

    Hope to talk again.

    MJ

  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    Who is Garrison Fewell?
    free wheels and a lot of those stuff
    time on another instrument

  8. #57

    User Info Menu

    good for you
    but what are you understanding?
    any hints appreciated

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    religious conversation?
    explain to me a little bit more
    Gods on the instrument
    Sorry about me

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by franco6719 View Post
    I have experienced a sort of religious conversion with this new book now. My new answer to all questions lies in two words: Garrison Fewell!!
    Wasn't he Rocky Marciano's cut-man?

  11. #60

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by hubert54 View Post
    Who is Garrison Fewell?
    free wheels and a lot of those stuff
    time on another instrument

    Not a real "religious conversion". I was just using a common English figure of speech, of course.

    Garrison Fewell is a jazz guitarist and educator who used to teach at Berklee at one time. I didn't run into him while I was there, unfortunately. He seems like an outstanding teacher. Anyway, he has written several books on "Jazz Improvisation" and he is one of the the few people who have written about the subject who actually gives many clear examples of lines and then explains exactly WHY and HOW those lines work, how to construct them yourself and so on. His approach is based heavily on arppegios and guide tones. This is what I have been trying to focus on lately and it was kind of "the right book at the right time" sort of experience. I also find it helpful in making clear things that I had already kind of arrived at by intuition or listening and playing.

  12. #61

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fast eddy View Post
    Wasn't he Rocky Marciano's cut-man?
    That was Garrison KEWL.

  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by silvatm View Post
    Hey everybody! I am new to the forum. I have a couple of jazz books, both by Jody Fisher, great books, but was wondering, does Mickey cover improvisation in any of the two books? I was also wondering since I am not a COMPLETE beginner (know how to bulid chords, can read music, know the theory, but can't make jazzy improvs to save my life) but a beginner nonetheless in the world of jazz, should I pick up this guitar method. Any suggestions?
    I recommend the Mickey Baker Book #1 for you. You are not a complete guitar beginner so it will be much clearer what Baker is teaching.

    What is he teaching? Pretty much what you need to know if you want to play jazz guitar (not fusion) standards. He teaches chord substitution, improvising, intros, vamps, endings, licks, bridges, etc.

    It's a great book but you have to put the effort into it. Invest a week per lesson, practicing around 2 hours a day. It will take you at least a year to go through the book. The first 6 months is chords.
    If that seems like a lot of time remember you probably don't really know how to use them in jazz. that's the trick.

    This isn't a book on how to play fusion (which IMO is NOT jazz) or chord melody. Go elsewhere for that. There are excellent chord melodies on this site.

    Follow the book lesson by lesson. No shortcuts. I have many, many books and videos but Baker's book is a gem.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 04-12-2009 at 02:22 PM.

  14. #63

    User Info Menu

    ok, I've two books from Mickey Baker
    But I don't know what he means with double time change or something like that. (a piece called "winterset")
    Anyway, I agree it's a challenge

  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by hubert54 View Post
    ok, I've two books from Mickey Baker
    But I don't know what he means with double time change or something like that. (a piece called "winterset")
    Anyway, I agree it's a challenge
    Means to double your speed for example from 8th to 16th notes.

  16. #65

    User Info Menu

    Mickey said :" The 2nd guitar plays chords in a quarter note rhythm up to the seventh system where it suddenly changes to an eighth note rhythm. The 1st guitar follows in the next measure creating the illusion
    that the tempo has suddenly doubled...
    This creates a nice "groove" and if you know how to do it, you can make a song really swing."

  17. #66

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by hubert54 View Post
    Mickey said :" The 2nd guitar plays chords in a quarter note rhythm up to the seventh system where it suddenly changes to an eighth note rhythm. The 1st guitar follows in the next measure creating the illusion
    that the tempo has suddenly doubled...
    This creates a nice "groove" and if you know how to do it, you can make a song really swing."
    You are learning some good stuff.

  18. #67

    User Info Menu

    There is "double-time" and "double-time feel". They are two different things.

    Double time means that the tempo is actually cut in half. For example, from 4/4 you go to 2/2. In double-time feel, you stay in the same meter, but you play everything twice as fast. For example, you are still in 4/4 but the rhythm section starts playing eight-notes as 16th notes and so on. But the soloist may still continue playing along as if nothing had changed in the accompaniment (still in 4/4).

  19. #68

    User Info Menu

    Hey hey, I'm taking my time going through this book as Baker suggests, but I'm a bit stuck on comping rhythms. Can anyone advise some variations aside from the standard charleston figure? Thanks.

  20. #69

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by DennisW View Post
    Hey hey, I'm taking my time going through this book as Baker suggests, but I'm a bit stuck on comping rhythms. Can anyone advise some variations aside from the standard charleston figure? Thanks.
    If you are able to play along with a backing of some sort (like Band-in-a-Box) just swing the rhythm. You don't have to play a strict cadence.

  21. #70

    User Info Menu

    Yeah I know swinging is the way to go, but I need some help on how to make these progressions a little more interesting. What I'm actually asking is, how would you guys play these exercises?

  22. #71

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by DennisW View Post
    Yeah I know swinging is the way to go, but I need some help on how to make these progressions a little more interesting. What I'm actually asking is, how would you guys play these exercises?
    Which exercise are you referring to?

    I usually just hit the bass note with my pick (or thumb) and claw the top notes with my fingers, or pinch all the notes, or strum, or arpeggiate the notes too.

    Baker says to be creative.

    I do try to follow the lesson however as regards to note durations so I do them as the lesson instructs to a great extent.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 05-23-2009 at 05:42 PM.

  23. #72

    User Info Menu

    Well I'm not that far yet, so I'm talking about the earlier lessons which have pretty simple progressions.

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    Hey Dennis, I am currently on lesson 11 and i find playing with a drum backing track or metronome is a must.

    then you can do whatever you want with the chord rhythm- as long as you just come back on the one (for example)

    playing them arpeggio style is also a must....start slow

    and his string bass style is yet another must-

    also slide into each chord..ie f#maj7 into gmaj7

    just get a swinging drum track or band in the box thing and practice practice practice -

    one last mickey baker tip - when he says to transpose exercises to other keys - do it- it might seem tedious at one point but it helps so much if you practice it
    I love Baker book ...i do use other sources and have played for many years

  25. #74

    User Info Menu

    I finally survived the lesson 6
    After that, the lesson 7 and 8 are "easy". It means that after 9 months, i can reach the lesson 9
    It may be very bad, but I am a very bad player
    When I look back, it is just impossible that I can play some chords of this book. They seems to me all difficult.

    My family is crazy everytime I play these chords, but I wanted to be sure that I can play that (almost) fluently before going further.

    To make a small break, I have decided to work the lesson of "there will never be an other you". It seems difficult to me also. After that, I will begin to work on the lesson 9

    Fantastic method, very interesting, but very hard for me (no time to practise enough)

  26. #75

    User Info Menu

    Those fabulous Baker Boys!, Mickey for chords and David for bebop improv? (vols 1, 2 and 3).

    You guys checked out the David Baker series? Now there's a series I'd love to hear as part of a software play along project!

  27. #76

    User Info Menu

    I just got this book last week it's cool that someone is working on it at the same time I am. And yeah those 26 chords.. WOW
    It might take a while to get to lesson 2

  28. #77

    User Info Menu

    Don't get hung up on a chapter too long. Keep pushing forward. You'll get plenty of practice playing the chords in subsequent lessons.

    There are just a few chapters that require a more extended stay.

  29. #78

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz Bug View Post
    Hopefully anyone that has this set of method books, or is interested in buying them will check in here.

    I received books 1&2 today. I plan on using this thread as a type of online blog, questions I have using the book, maybe something that I find helped me using the book. Anything, and everything.

    Hopefully more experienced players, or people who use the book can stop in and help when needed. I think this will be a great tool for any other beginners that come along like me...

    Ok, page one....

    26 chords to learn...ouch!...

    This is my first thought, all of this can be overwhelming!! How am I going to be able to do this?? I can tell you first thing, I have no clue...

    I'll start with the first chords, move on from there. I really want to play Jazz guitar. I have wanted to for a very long time, today I begin, come see me in a year....

    Joe
    Jazzbug,
    I have the original Mickey Baker book ($1.95). I credit 90% of what I know to this book. The Elders and well learned on this forum call each chord a "GRIP", so mulriply every chord you learn by 12 and the spooky 26 chords will vanish quickly...Good Luck with Mickey

  30. #79

    User Info Menu

    I have been hanging out around this site for awhile, learning by reading. After going through this thread I bought all three of the Baker books on Amazon, and I'm just amazed by how much is in them, thin as they are. I'll be working on them for years! In 30+ years of playing there are a lot of things in there I use already, but still there is a lot of new that will keep my hands stretching. Whew!

  31. #80

    User Info Menu

    I've had the Mickey Baker book since the 70's, misplaced it, bought a new one 3 years ago and still haven't been able to approach it. I have been playing rock, blues and country for 40 years and I guess I have a stigma about moving out of my comfort zone but maybe this thread will help me break through.

  32. #81

    User Info Menu

    Glad theres someone else who can understand 'not enough time' great that you can keep up the practice manu68 Thankyou for your updates of success keeping yourself accountable! you've inspired me to get out of my no practice rut/apathy which im sure its just due to moving to a new city/house/job recently.
    I've just bought Mickey Bakers 'vol 1' which i used once two weeks ago and will have dedicated practice sessions again starting tonight -'tomorrow' just hasnt been working out for me due to sleeping in and watching crap tv (it really is).
    Did you sacrifice much to commit to pracitce?
    Have you still been building your repertiore with new songs?

    Ill probably run the book in tandem with my other recent purchase Jamey
    Abersolds improv vol 1 (which I spent a week regularly practicing 1 1/2 months ago).

    Finishing my sessions with noodling! practice just dosnt feel complete for me without being in the 'zone' it drives my wife crazy (not the good kind lol)
    Anyway thankyou and best of luck with your studies.

  33. #82

    User Info Menu

    Thanks Elrond
    But I am not a good example regarding practise !
    To many things to do in the real life.
    I found personnally the lesson 6 very difficult. It took me months to go through.
    And now that I can play that complicated things almost easily, i feel stronger

    I am currently working on lesson 10.
    Only the result counts. slowly, but surely.

    I have to say that it is a little boring for my family to ear all the time only the same "good" mickey baker chords and style, because I belong to the people able to work on a small exercise for weeks if I like it. Crazy !! I can understand my family who would like to ear more "real music", so I have decided to work in parallel with two other books, and to learn real standards. I also play some folk,blues and rock songs on my epiphone/stratocaster (stones, beatles, U2, springsteen....).It brings some fun, and a more global approach, but I don't go really quick through the lessons.

    I have learned also my first standard , Autumn leaves. Not so original, but it has nice lyrics in french and I like it !! I have to choose the next one to learn !

    I bought the book "Swing and big band guitar, Four to the bar comping in the style of Freddie Green", from Charlton Johnson.
    From my point of view, this is a fantastic book. I like it very much.
    Of course it is very specialized in a style, but there is precious things to learn within. It is a very good complement to the mickey baker book because it explain very good how to reduce the chords. and it has backtracks on CD.

    The last book I am studying in a systematic way is the book
    "Jazz Rythm guitar ; A systematic approach to chord progression" from roger edison.
    This one is really close to mickey baker, but focus more on learning the I-V7-I, the ii-V7-Imaj7, and so on. Very progressive to learn the chords substitutions and so on. I didn't found the book on the net. So I had to print it from a .pdf

    If I can go through these three books, I am pretty sure that I will have a very good ground knowledge of jazz rythm guitar.

    It will take me 5 years or more, but after all it is not very important. I could play good jazz guitar for the 40 years left .
    The important thing for me is not what to play, it is just to play when I can.

    Last thing.
    It comes soon christmas, and it will bring me Band in a box and a looper (Jam4 from line 6). I am pretty sure that it will change my life of poor alone guitarist .
    I could play the mickey baker exercices with backtracks

  34. #83

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by pauljoey View Post
    Jazzbug,
    I have the original Mickey Baker book ($1.95). I credit 90% of what I know to this book. The Elders and well learned on this forum call each chord a "GRIP", so mulriply every chord you learn by 12 and the spooky 26 chords will vanish quickly...Good Luck with Mickey
    Thanks for the kind words!

    I did not even remember that I started this thread until I came on tonight and was browisng through the forums. I can tell you that I never made it past lesson two after I first posted... but now I am back on track, put in my time today.

    One day at a time with this guitar....

    Happy to see the thread alive and well!

  35. #84

    User Info Menu

    Take a tip. Don't bite off more than you can chew.

    The Baker Book 1 can take all your time. That book alone will take a couple years to get through. Many more to master.

    How can you possibly study three books at the same time?

    Answer: You can't.

    Would you take lessons from 3 different teachers at the same time? Nonsense.

    Baker says to practice 2 hours a day. If you have time or desire after that...

    As far as time management:

    Watching crap TV is a waste of your time. Get serious.

  36. #85

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Stylemaster View Post
    I've had the Mickey Baker book since the 70's, misplaced it, bought a new one 3 years ago and still haven't been able to approach it. I have been playing rock, blues and country for 40 years and I guess I have a stigma about moving out of my comfort zone but maybe this thread will help me break through.
    Hello Stylemaster,

    I have a similar history. I bought my copy in 1977 and put that sucker off till 2007. I've been studying both Mickey Bakers Vol I up to Chapter 12 and Robert Conti's chord melodies for the last couple of years. I'm also located in Central New Jersey too. If you're intersted, PM me if you'd like to get together. I might be able to show you a couple of things I've learned to get you jumped started! It's really not that hard once you get the fingering down for those jazzy chords!

    Good Luck!
    Alex R.

    Guild: X-700, X-500, X-170, X-150
    Fender: Roadhouse Stratocaster (1997)
    Kay: K-11
    Epiphone: Joe Pass Emperor-II

  37. #86

    User Info Menu

    Mickey baker is and remain my main guitar course. It is soooo great.
    I give it a try every day, even only 10 minutes.
    I can't afford to play two hours a day. At least not every day.

    I really think that it is necessary to take account of the other member of my family. For me Mickey baker sounds great, but not espacially for them every day !

    This is why I try to play also some other examples from other sources.
    It works for me, I am very happy with that.
    I understand a lot more theory behind the mickey baker exercices.

    And christmas is coming. I have to check my set list !!!

    It doesn't really care if It takes me 5 years instead of two to get through the Mickey baker's course. After all, I am young
    I am currently working on lesson 10. I have the feeling that it goes every day better. The beginning of the book is very hard , but it goes better after lesson 6 .
    All is not perfect, but I am already impressed of what I already achieved.
    I have great time improvising in all keys (big words in my case) with the sequences I have already learned in lessons 1-10

  38. #87

    User Info Menu

    Bought vol.1 and vol. 2 in 1968. I was 16 at the time. Now I'm 57 and starting over with lesson 1 in vol. 1. How many books are out there that can take that long to get thru !!!!! LOL Now my Grandson and I studying them together.
    Dave

  39. #88

    User Info Menu

    I also have to thank Michael for the Baker web site- i am on lesson 33 and the site is a great help to go along with the book.
    Love the baker book, using multiple books but if you do EXACTLY as Baker says it works.

  40. #89

    User Info Menu

    Since I offically began using the book this past week, one thing I noticed myself doing was calling the chords by the form numbers listed, instead of actually calling them by their proper names.

    I caught myself on it, and tonight I went through each one by chord names only, ignoring the 1-26.

    Just something to keep on your mind if you are just beginning.

    How about neck aches!

    I have to say, I started Saturday, and I already see real progress. Not in the sense that I could jump in with a band, but my fingering of the chords is a bit easier, and the changes are getting smoother. A bunch of these chords sound really sweet too!

  41. #90

    User Info Menu

    Just want to throw a question out there for those of you experienced with the Baker books.

    I read a bunch of posts where people say that most of what they learned about Jazz came directly from these books.

    My question is basically this, what did you learn when it comes to playing/using what you have practiced?

    Say I flip open the Real Book, when I am done with the Baker book will I have the ability to open to any tune and play a song? Examples, maybe All The Things You Are, or Autumn Leaves. These are both tunes I touched on during previous guitar lessons with teachers, but never made it to the point of playing them. I'm wondering if the book will give me this skill, without a teacher.

    I'm already feeling confident with what I am learning, the number of chords and so on, and I have refused to open the Real Book, because if I see the chords that I am practicing, I am going to want to play the tunes. I just don't want to lose my focus on the Baker book. Maybe I'm slowing my own progress though...

    Any thoughts, or experience is appreciated!

    Just a note, I am out of work. Once I find work I will be getting with a Jazz guitarist for lessons, one who plays live shows. I've taken the time out of work to find the right teacher, it is really important to find a guitarist who can teach, and who plays Jazz. My past teachers have been guitar players, but not Jazz guitarists, there is a huge difference.

  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    I just can speak about my experience.
    Mickey baker's book is a nice tool, but a lot of things are hide in the background. For a deep explanation, you will have to go on the website of Michael.

    What is great with this book, is that you can make exercises and it sounds from the begining like music.. It focuses not espacially on theory, but practise and practise. Even if you understand nothing , you can play something which sound like jazz guitar.

    The chords used are mainly subsitution from other chords. It doesn't matter.
    You can work on chord groups which work together, and playing them all the neck will make you for sure a better guitarist. You will not learn all the chords available, but a good basis to play a lot of things and have fun
    You will surprise you very quick improvising by combining theses chords.

    After that, playing by sightreading all the fake books is an other thing because you have to know and read all the subsitution on the fly.
    Easy for some of us here, very complicated for me.

    The learning frame is good if you like this style.

    If you want to learn "easier chords" (3 notes chords), learn how to ignore all the embellishement (b519, ....), and play quicker rhythm guitar with fake book or tabs in the freddie green style, I recommand you to give a try to this book "Swing and big band guitar, four-to-the-bar comping in the style of freddie green / by charlton johnson". It has all the exercises and backtracks on CD. I bought it recently and I like it a lot.

    Mickey baker book is like reading the bible

  43. #92

    User Info Menu

    This thread has inspired me to pull out the Mickey Baker I've had for years and work through it. The only book I ever managed to work most of the way through before is the Johnny Smith method, and that was over 30 years ago.
    I do have a couple questions, however. First, I'm in Lesson 4 and have no trouble playing the chords as written, but am curious if in later lessons there is an explanation of why certain chords sub for others instead of just showing them in contrast to the original. The second is a little different. Once upon a time, I ran across a file that listed the names of all the tunes Baker used the changes from. Unfortunately I can't find it anymore, probably was on a computer that died with no backup files. Anybody know of a file like this?
    Brad
    PS BTW, the Michael Joyce lesson guide is great, thank you Michael. It has led me to purchasing Tabledit. I've used the viewer from it for years, but because I have a couple other notation programs never got around to buying the full version. Now, with the great hints on its use I went and did it.

  44. #93

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by brad4d8 View Post
    but am curious if in later lessons there is an explanation of why certain chords sub for others instead of just showing them in contrast to the original.
    See Lesson 12

  45. #94

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Drumbler View Post
    See Lesson 12
    Thanks, It'll be about six weeks 'til I get there.
    Brad

  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    I'm about a third of the way through William Leavitt's "Modern Method for Guitar vol. 3," and since progress is starting to plateau a little bit, I've thought about supplementing that book with something else. The one spoken of in this thread seems like a worthy candidate. My concern is, will Mickey Baker's book have any conflicting information? The thing about Leavitt's book is that it introduces what seems to be a pretty strict system, so I'm curious if I should finish that book and give myself a complete thought before moving on, or if it's just fine to begin broadening my horizons a little bit.

    Leavitt has done an amazing job of improving my knowledge of the fretboard and I feel like I have a pretty strong repertoire of chord forms. However, my improvisation skills seems limited, primarily due to my poor use of chromaticism and very little formal knowledge on how to form a good phrase. Does Mickey Baker have much to offer in that area? I feel like Leavitt gives you plenty of tools for soloing, but falls short in the area of how to apply those tools.

  47. #96

    User Info Menu

    I made up some chord melodies using "Mickey Baker" chords.

    If you understand the concept of creating a chord melody (put the melody note on top), Baker's chords allow you to do it! He gives you enough chords to do it.

    You don't have to learn any more chords in most cases.

    Here's a link to my thread in the Chord Melody Forum:

    Chord melody with "Mickey Baker" chords
    Last edited by Drumbler; 12-22-2009 at 10:53 AM.

  48. #97

    User Info Menu

    Okay, so a couple days ago I posted a question about how well this book fits into a practice regimen that includes William Leavitt's "Modern Method for Guitar." Well, I went ahead and ordered the book (it was cheap enough) and gave it a shot. Now I have a new concern. After going through two volumes of Leavitt's book, the first couple of pages of Baker's book seem completely trivial. I've had these same patterns hammered repeatedly into my brain over the passed year.

    However, I'm willing to temporarily abandon Leavitt's book (maybe go back and review the first two volumes of it every once in awhile) in order to get through Baker's book, which appears to be a more direct and pragmatic approach to jazz.

    My question, though, is how strongly is it recommended that I practice 2 hours per day and only move on to the next lesson after a week? Is that primarily directed at players that are almost brand new to the instrument, or is it recommended for anyone who picks the book up? I'm a terrible judge of my own ability, but that seems excessive and perhaps not the best use of my time. For example, 14 hours dedicated to playing a basic rhythm over 7 chords seems like quite a feat of mental discipline. Should I keep doing this despite the tedium? Should I keep practicing a lesson beyond the point that I feel that I've mastered it? I ask these questions in all seriousness, because mapping out my routine for the next year is a pretty big commitment.

    Thanks in advance.

  49. #98

    User Info Menu

    In the early part of the book it is indeed possible to practice a particular lesson two hours a day.

    But once you progress farther into the book this becomes difficult as you need to review past lessons.

    I believe Baker meant to practice at least two hours a day in totality.

    Mickey Baker is still alive and lives in France. It would be nice if we could ask him about his book.

  50. #99

    User Info Menu

    Hello to everybody, I would like to ask a couple of questions involving M. Baker's Jazz Guitar book and some other jazz related issues.

    Firstly I should probably say, that I am a guitar player for around a year in a half, but that time span really doesn't accurately describe my current level, because there were large breaks from the guitar and jus 5 months ago I went ahead and bought myself an electric guitar, ending my era of playing an accoustic one. My playing, until about a few months back, consisted of easy rock covers and some basic composing in the same matter. Then I got stunned by the simplistic beauty of Joe Pass' music and decided, that jazz is my calling.

    I should also mention, that I have been playing the piano for 11 years, then the doublebass for 3, then a little bass guitar and, finnally I ended up falling in love with the plain guitar, if I may say so.

    I have learned music theory for 12 years, but the fact is, I was learning it thinking I will never needed, and it was orientated to classical music, as well as my playing, as with both piano and doublebass I played only classical music.

    So, to wrap it up, I have almost no ability to improvise, but have good knowlege about how music works in general, as well as reading sheets or anything of that matter.

    So, finnally, after all of this, my questions are:

    1. I am through a couple of lessons in Baker's book, so far I am learning chords, to connect them etc., but I think I am lacking very much in understanding of jazz music. My father is sort of a jazz musician, so I obviously have heard a lot of it, but I do not understand it, I can only hear phrasings to a certain level, not to mention being able to understand, what king of movement is happening. I have Mark Levine's jazz theory book and am going through it, but I am finding difficulties memorising the information and, esspecially, applying anything to the guitar, or even the piano. this is mainly because I have learned all my music theory in Lithuania, so the English terms are a challenge for me. Are there any suggestions, how could I better translate the theory knowlege to the guitar?

    I am sorry for all the unnecessary information, but I didn't want to leave any of it out for a complete answer.

    Thank you very much in advance,

    Gediminas
    Last edited by Gediminas; 01-08-2010 at 07:05 PM.

  51. #100

    User Info Menu

    Gediminas,

    Rather than try to answer your questions I will tell you to keep at it and work through each lesson one by one.

    All will be clear in time. Baker's book has been in use for 50+years. If it didn't have value it wouldn't still be around.

    Six months from now you will understand more.

    My one tip would be to learn about chord substitution. Search the web and read up on it.