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  1. #101

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    Here's a start, if somebody wants to pick it up. All I've added are chords.
    Was going to edit out count-in but forgot it.

    https://www.box.com/s/59cc3456a3d5696a98b4

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Hey Oldhead, you're playing great, but I'm afraid all I can hear is my mistakes and the rests where I still rush. Do you think you could record the chords alone so I can play over them? Obviously, you'll need to count me in.

    if you don't have time, don't worry, it's not that important. Just my vanity.

  4. #103

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    I'll see if I can find a drum track to play over to help our timing, but probably won't be for a day or two. I go to Hopkins tomorrow.

    EDIT: I probably won't be posting for a few days, at least, so knocked out this quickie. It doesn't sound great, but I hope it helps. I thought you sound good on the other one.
    I didn't give you a count in per se, but gave you a few measures of drums and a transition. I'm sure you'll figure it out.

    https://www.box.com/s/d89f503781c1f0dd526b
    Last edited by oldhead; 06-18-2012 at 09:28 PM.

  5. #104

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    Dave, that's great! Sounds cool. I will have another go, it will be much more fun playing with you.

    My thoughts are with you today, hope all goes well.

  6. #105

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    OK, at long last, here's me playing Vic's groove to Oldhead's rhythm and drums track. Apologies, especially to Oldhead, that the rhythm track doesn't come across. I had it playing through my bass amp, and while I played I could hardly hear myself, but somehow the Zoom made me sound louder than the track. Still, catchy tune.

    https://www.box.com/s/ec7a49234227207f7e2d

    I should add it's been great playing to the backing, Oldhead, much more calming than being totally solo. I'll try recording again, I think it's the positioning of the amp and the Zoom that was wrong.
    Last edited by ten left thumbs; 06-24-2012 at 01:42 PM.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    OK, at long last, here's me playing Vic's groove to Oldhead's rhythm and drums track. Apologies, especially to Oldhead, that the rhythm track doesn't come across. I had it playing through my bass amp, and while I played I could hardly hear myself, but somehow the Zoom made me sound louder than the track. Still, catchy tune.

    https://www.box.com/s/ec7a49234227207f7e2d

    I should add it's been great playing to the backing, Oldhead, much more calming than being totally solo. I'll try recording again, I think it's the positioning of the amp and the Zoom that was wrong.
    Hey! Sounds really good. Your playing improves by big, big strides, Laura - I'm so proud of you and how you work at this stuff. You're a guitar player!

    And, oldhead - BIG rhythm, buddy. Sounds superb, professional, smooth and pulse-like. I dig it.

    kj

  8. #107

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    TLT, Nice job on that. And, yeah, it's much more fun playing with someone or a track than just solo. A lot of times I'll try to find a drum track/ and/or make a rhythm track just to listen to in the background.

    Thanks. Kojo. Waiting to hear your lead!

  9. #108

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    Thanks guys. Make no mistake, I can still screw it up! It's very much hit and miss for many of those passages.

  10. #109

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    Does anyone have a clue what song these chords are to? I know the lead doesn't fit - I was just noodling around trying to randomly hit a lick that would tip me off to the song. I know it must have been in the mid to late 60s, and I know I've played it, but for the life of me can't come up with the tune. I just started playing chords last night and these came to me. I'm sure I played it 45 or so years ago but just can't figure what song it is. If anyone has any ideas, it would be much appreciated. If this is wrong place for a post like this, please feel free to have it deleted. Thanks.
    https://www.box.com/s/e3bce90f4d60f4eecfab

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead
    Does anyone have a clue what song these chords are to? I know the lead doesn't fit - I was just noodling around trying to randomly hit a lick that would tip me off to the song. I know it must have been in the mid to late 60s, and I know I've played it, but for the life of me can't come up with the tune. I just started playing chords last night and these came to me. I'm sure I played it 45 or so years ago but just can't figure what song it is. If anyone has any ideas, it would be much appreciated. If this is wrong place for a post like this, please feel free to have it deleted. Thanks.
    https://www.box.com/s/e3bce90f4d60f4eecfab
    I'm thinking it's something by the band America.

  12. #111

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    Hi Oldhead, I'm sure I have absolutely no idea what it is, but it does sound great!

  13. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead
    Does anyone have a clue what song these chords are to? I know the lead doesn't fit - I was just noodling around trying to randomly hit a lick that would tip me off to the song. I know it must have been in the mid to late 60s, and I know I've played it, but for the life of me can't come up with the tune.
    Ha - I listened about five times but kept being distracted by the sweet lead playing - good job, o.h. // It does have the America major 7 I-IVs. I first thought Tony Joe White's "Rainy Night in Georgia," but no. Sounds familiar, but nothing comes to mind.

    kj

  14. #113

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    Thanks for listening. If I ever figure it out, I'll let you know.

  15. #114

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    Gerry and the Pacemakers - Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying (1964)

  16. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead
    Gerry and the Pacemakers - Don't Let the Sun Catch You Crying (1964)
    YEAH! Oh, what a tune... this is another ironing board tune. My mom has the greatest taste in songs, and she sang while she ironed, and I played beneath the ironing board just to hear her sing. Beautiful stuff.

    If not for Mom, I would have heard nothing but Grand Ol' Opry (my dad.) She'd put on Sinatra or Andy Williams, and Dad would do an Archie Bunker whine, "Aw, could you get that shit off the record player?" (As if there were a more appropriate place for it....)

    kj ...>>>> Listen to it now! https://www.box.com/s/62b3c74b843568b4848f
    Last edited by Kojo27; 07-01-2012 at 06:12 PM. Reason: link to tune

  17. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    Good idea!

    About a month ago I hit a complete wall with Modern Method. I got to this point, there were so many things I just couldn't do, I couldn't make any progress counted in page numbers. I spent a good few weeks marking time with the book, and also playing from other books I found. Here's one:

    This tune has really got in to my head - just ordered the book.

    Michael

  18. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27
    For those (like me) learning to sight-read, I think there's no better book than Leon White's *awesome* Sight to Sound. This book fits right in with Leavitt in that White advocates and teaches position playing as a way of sight-reading, and the fingerings he uses are essentially Leavitt's -- finger stretches, opposed to shifts (in caged-like systems.)

    White's book was among my dad's big trunk o' guitar junk, is from the 1970s, and was published by Dale Zdenek, original publisher of Ted Greene's great books.

    Go to abebooks.com -- there are a couple there, CHEAP. $7.98 each I thik. Check Alibris.com and Amazon. (Warning: some of Leon White's books - Styles for the Studio, for one - are going to $150 - $200. Grab this one while it's cheap.)

    This link works the day of this posting: Leon White - Sight to Sound - Zdenek - AbeBooks
    I realize that I'm late to the party - but how did you get on with studying both books together ? Like yourself, I'm learning to sight read from pretty much from the beginning (I could "count" my way up and down the stave before starting with the Leavitt book - improving slowly though.

    Before buying the Leavitt book, I had a stack of books in my Amazon basket including this one and the David Oakes book.

    Did it work well? Or is there enough material at each level of the Leavitt book? On the one hand I think I'd benefit from a supplementary source, on the other, when I browse forward in the book, there's just so much!

    Michael

  19. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by michael-m
    I realize that I'm late to the party - but how did you get on with studying both books together ? Like yourself, I'm learning to sight read from pretty much from the beginning (I could "count" my way up and down the stave before starting with the Leavitt book - improving slowly though.

    Before buying the Leavitt book, I had a stack of books in my Amazon basket including this one and the David Oakes book.

    Did it work well? Or is there enough material at each level of the Leavitt book? On the one hand I think I'd benefit from a supplementary source, on the other, when I browse forward in the book, there's just so much!

    Michael
    I didn't mean to imply that I had worked through both Leavitt and White; no. I had, however, perused White's book and could see that he uses Leavitt's fingerings, almost identically, and he espouses sight-reading out of "positions" the way Leavitt does. I'm working with the books NOW.

    The White book is full of reading, whereas the Leavitt book isn't. Mr. Leavitt said that the student would need additional reading materials - that the studies in the Method books are insufficient. Leavitt produced two or three books of extra reading (Melodic Rhythms for Guitar; Classical Studies for Pick-Style Guitar, etc.), but it's my own humble opinion that even this is not enough. Dig up clarinet music, flute pieces, anything that will fit on the fingerboard somehow. Frederick Noad's classical guitar book is a goldmine of first position (and higher!) reading studies.


    Another book of reading studies, which also uses position playing and 'stretch' fingerings, is Joshua Breakstone's "Jazz Guitar Etudes" - and I think I have the title wrong, but it's close to that. Breakstone's name will get you to the book. This one goes higher up the neck, but is still invaluable, as it focuses on reading rhythms.


    Grab a copy of White while you can - there aren't many left. Get the Oakes book, too (I need that one myself.) Sight reading takes a lot of work, I'm finding out; but the payoffs are huge.

    kj

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27
    I didn't mean to imply that I had worked through both Leavitt and White; no. I had, however, perused White's book and could see that he uses Leavitt's fingerings, almost identically, and he espouses sight-reading out of "positions" the way Leavitt does. I'm working with the books NOW.

    The White book is full of reading, whereas the Leavitt book isn't. Mr. Leavitt said that the student would need additional reading materials - that the studies in the Method books are insufficient. Leavitt produced two or three books of extra reading (Melodic Rhythms for Guitar; Classical Studies for Pick-Style Guitar, etc.), but it's my own humble opinion that even this is not enough. Dig up clarinet music, flute pieces, anything that will fit on the fingerboard somehow. Frederick Noad's classical guitar book is a goldmine of first position (and higher!) reading studies.


    Another book of reading studies, which also uses position playing and 'stretch' fingerings, is Joshua Breakstone's "Jazz Guitar Etudes" - and I think I have the title wrong, but it's close to that. Breakstone's name will get you to the book. This one goes higher up the neck, but is still invaluable, as it focuses on reading rhythms.


    Grab a copy of White while you can - there aren't many left. Get the Oakes book, too (I need that one myself.) Sight reading takes a lot of work, I'm finding out; but the payoffs are huge.

    kj
    I've had a clear out of my bookshelves to sell all my old Uni books, the proceeds to go towards ...music books - conservation of mass and all that

    I've got the 3 Vol copy of Leavitt, on the way is:

    25 graded pieces for plectrum (inspired by Ten Left Thumbs).
    The "White" book.
    Shearer's scale position book.
    125 easy pieces for flute.

    Should keep me busy for a while...

    Michael

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by michael-m

    Should keep me busy for a while...

    Michael
    Don't forget to add the real book! Also, Dr. Charles Colins and Bugs Bower's Rhythms complete-the treble clef one. This is one of the best book on rhythms I've seen. Google it if you're interested. If I were you I would just focus on a few things at a time. This stuff could overwhelm you.

  22. #121

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    I'm new to the forum and am thrilled to see this set up! I'm currently working through Modern Method and am up to pg 20.

    My question is how long do you guys work at one lesson? I'm really trying NOT to memorize the lessons and have been working at them till I'm comfortable with the material, even if I can't play it perfectly (w/ a metronome). But I keep moving because I know that there are tons of exercises ahead that will keep me working on past material (note recognition, specific intervals, quickly moving to chords, ect.)

    My goal in this method is reading not performance...

    Thoughts?

  23. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by fly4him17
    I'm new to the forum and am thrilled to see this set up! I'm currently working through Modern Method and am up to pg 20.

    My question is how long do you guys work at one lesson? I'm really trying NOT to memorize the lessons and have been working at them till I'm comfortable with the material, even if I can't play it perfectly (w/ a metronome). But I keep moving because I know that there are tons of exercises ahead that will keep me working on past material (note recognition, specific intervals, quickly moving to chords, ect.)

    My goal in this method is reading not performance...

    Thoughts?
    Here are my personal thoughts, just how I perceive it:

    The original idea behind this study group was that they would "record their ways through the book" - using video and/or audio files to document, so to speak, their having done the work.

    The first group of a dozen or so quickly went to half that, and the smaller group hung together with an occasional dropout, the group thinning as the book moved closer to the end. If I recall, the last 25% of the book was completed by two (2) people, the most tenacious of the original 12 or so, and also the best sight-readers, going in.

    I tried to jump into the original group at about page 39 (I had done a cursory work-through of the book eons ago) and worked for a month or so -- I stopped because of 1) health problems/vision problems, 2) problems keeping up (I was and still am a poor sight reader, but I'm working at it, and 3) most of the group was way ahead of me and I got almost no feedback (thanks, TLT, for always being there : )

    Then (I'm assuming you give a rat's rump about this), after the original two finished, I started from the beginning. You'll find videos and audio links not far back in this thread. That trailed off (though I haven't given up!!!) because of health (depression) problems. I hope to get back to where I left off soon. Hope.

    Now: the original group worked 1 lesson per week, and this is doable if you sight-read well, or if (in my case anyway) you devote all your playing time just to Leavitt. Or, if you don't mind posting videos and audios with mistakes. I'm too perfectionistic to post a glaring mistake. Some aren't. TLT had the best, healthiest attitude and she finished with the original group. It all comes down to sight-reading. Not "reading" - but sight-reading. Reading and playing in real time. If you can do this, you can finish a lesson in just a bit of time (an hour? Two?) The duets (obviously) are the hardest to record without errors, but if you sight-read well, you can knock 'em out in one take.

    Record something, an exercise, a duet, anything - and post it. Who knows, maybe I'll follow suit. If you need more info, send me a PM. Or post back here.

    KJ

  24. #123

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    Thanks KJ, that's quite helpful and makes me think of another question.

    It seems like I should be asking when to move to the next page. I'm currently turning the page when I feel moderately comfortable with the material but my performance of the exercises and duets will have several errors. I keep reviewing them till they are perfect as he says... "regular review of all material is a must!"

    Here's an example of where I am now.Today I spent most of my time practicing pages 18-20 (eighth notes and Etude no. 1). Playing with a metronome I can get through pg. 19 with 5-6 mistakes and pg 20 with a dozen+ mistakes. However I REVIEWED the Imitation Duet on page 14 w/ a metronome and made one mistake in one attempt.

    I'm simply asking about the pace. I know that by working on page 20, I'm practicing material that its present on page 14.

    I like the idea of posting simply for the accountability but I've never recorded myself before. Maybe I can find an easy method to do that. (I have garageband and audacity.) Is there a place on the forum for tips on quick recording?

    Thanks again. This is the best forum I've seen (along with the Ted Greene forums but they aren't intended for beginners.)

  25. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by fly4him17
    Thanks KJ, that's quite helpful and makes me think of another question.

    It seems like I should be asking when to move to the next page. I'm currently turning the page when I feel moderately comfortable with the material but my performance of the exercises and duets will have several errors. I keep reviewing them till they are perfect as he says... "regular review of all material is a must!"

    Here's an example of where I am now.Today I spent most of my time practicing pages 18-20 (eighth notes and Etude no. 1). Playing with a metronome I can get through pg. 19 with 5-6 mistakes and pg 20 with a dozen+ mistakes. However I REVIEWED the Imitation Duet on page 14 w/ a metronome and made one mistake in one attempt.

    I'm simply asking about the pace. I know that by working on page 20, I'm practicing material that its present on page 14.

    I like the idea of posting simply for the accountability but I've never recorded myself before. Maybe I can find an easy method to do that. (I have garageband and audacity.) Is there a place on the forum for tips on quick recording?

    Thanks again. This is the best forum I've seen (along with the Ted Greene forums but they aren't intended for beginners.)
    You are doing it right. Leavitt states explicitly that the student should not try to master each exercise or etude or duet -- but should do as you are doing... we should gain some familiarity with the thing, understand the concepts, etc. - but move on. Plow forth into new ground, and let REVIEW be the way to "perfecting" the material. The goal is to be able to play the material well, to play it as music - but Leavitt was wise enough to know that "perfecting as you go" would take far too much time, and that burnout would happen.

    Well then, what's the thing with recording our way through? Well, IMHO, it's both a brilliant idea (for the accountability factor, the group environment, the sense of forward motion created), and a potentially bad idea. I think this is potentially a bad approach because "recording," to many (to me, anyway), carries that connotation of "perfection." We think of the nature of recorded music and find ourselves doing that, albeit on a small scale, and few can tolerate the thought of settling for a flawed recording. Even fewer are willing to post one for all to hear, imo.

    So there's the rub. As I said earlier, those who can sight-read will have no problem recording more or less mistake-free versions of the stuff, and one week is more than enough time. But for most, who can't yet sight-read (it's one of the main purposes of the book!), the week will become endless hours of getting almost to the end of Part 1 of a duet, screwing up, starting over, knowing part 2 is ALL still ahead, plus the rest of the lesson... and exasperation sets in and burnout happens, and bang - dropout.

    If we could all be like TLT, this would be a wonderful thing. Although her posts had "errors" or "mistakes" - she posted them anyway and moved on to fresh material. While working on the new stuff, however, she reviewed the old. She continues to review the Leavitt book now (I spoke with her not long ago), and within a few months she'll probably have fairly mastered the material. This was Leavitt's aim.

    Perhaps if we made it a rule that no perfect posts are permitted (sounds crazy, but think about it!), we'd all reap the proper benefits, if we commit to reviewing on our own.

    RECORDING: Somewhere in these threads (probably in this one or in the first lesson's thread), the founder of this group, "FEP," gave some good tips on recording - explained how he recorded his own videos, I'm pretty sure.

    For audio tracks, you can use Windows "Sound Recorder" and a simple PC microphone. I use Audacity and an M-Audio interface, which allows me to use a condenser mic, or to plug a guitar "straight in" (no amp) and record with Audacity, then clip and tidy up the file as needed. Some (TLT) use Zoom recorders. I have a Sony digital recorder that I used a lot of times. Any way of making an electronic sound file will work.

    Once you've made your recording, you'll need to upload it. Most of us use box.com - just make an account and you get 5 GB free, upload your files, paste the link-to-file in your post, and that's how that works. Easy once you've done it once or twice.

    For videos, upload to a YouTube account and link to that.

    For recording duets, you'll have to use a program like Audacity, which lets you do overdubs; OR, you can record one part, let it play through speakers, and play the other part while recording both. OR you can record each part along with the guy on the DVD (if you have that.) Or do each part singly; but the duets are best if both parts are brought into sync, imo.

    Btw, *YOUR* thoughts and ideas are welcome, too! Right now the group has sort of ground to a halt... perhaps two or three people posting would get it going again. I'm on page 16, I think ("Here We Go Again" duet). So we aren't far apart. For completeness' sake, you might want to post all the material, starting from the first page. Just make sure it goes in the proper thread - use the thread index for this.

    kj
    Last edited by Kojo27; 11-16-2012 at 10:58 PM.

  26. #125

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    Is Melodic Rhythms meant to supplement book 1 or does it seem more appropriate for Book 2? I ordered the MM Jazz Songbook, which arrived today, so I will already be adding in some supplemental material. Currently on page 72 of MM1.