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  1. #1

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    Is it time we officially moved onto the next week's material? Just a few more notes...

    I think it is. I've moved on to the new material already. I waited very patiently until last night to start. I was so good this week.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Thanks for that exercise, Frank.

    I have to admit that like many of us, I automatically use fingers and thumb for playing these type of chords. I first learned the 'rest' stroke when I played classical guitar a long time ago and it still comes more easily than playing a similar motion with a pick and allowing it to come to rest on the string after the target (high) note. Coupling that with muting an open string in the middle and it is clear that it will take some time to master the pick in this way. Your exercise should be a great help.

    I second Strumcat's thoughts on composition versus (when it becomes an either/or situation) practice.

  4. #3

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    Frank - regarding your comments on composition, you're right on. Next time I'll try to be less liberal with my use of chords and implied chords.

    This time round, as I indicated, I wasn't really very structured other than combining notes within the C scale to create harmonies. Indeed most of them (I haven't checked all of them) were I IV and V chords - for example, my opening chord looks like an Em (which would be the III chord) but the C-note played by the second guitar makes it a CMaj7, or IMaj7. My second measure would be a simple IV chord, F + A + C, but the melody line of guitar-2 adds a D note, so this might be an instantaneous variation to an F6 chord. It gets more complicated in the third measure, as the F chord now becomes an Fsus4 for guitar-1, but the melody line adds a D note, which to me implies at this point an F6sus4. Where it gets tricky is that starting with the melody's D note, here, the chord can also be interpreted as a Dm, D + F + A, with an added B, making it a Dm6 chord, or a form of the II chord (and not the IV chord implied by F).

    The same principle applies then throughout the composition until the last measure which starts with a CMaj7 chord again (although the E note is implied by being picked up on beat 3), but to which a D note (the second or ninth degree of the scale) is added: this makes it a CMaj9 chord - the IMaj9 if you like.

    Hope this is generally clear, as it is theoretically beyond these first few pages of Leavitt. In any event, I'm sure that it will become clear as we progress :-) but for the moment, I was just allowing my fingers to find what I felt to be nice chord variations with melodic intonations!

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    ... I don't think the rest stroke idea is intended as 'this is how you should play through your whole guitar career' - just 'this is how you should start'. ...
    I'm really glad you posted, and for a lot of reasons:
    1. I also would like to hear from ronjazz.
    2. I think ronjazz made it clear in his post that there are other ways of picking, and that this is a recommendation for now. If anything I said sounded like recommending it for "your whole guitar career", just let me know what it was, and I'll try to be clearer in the future.
    3. I didn't hear ronjazz discuss rotating the wrist and I also wondered about this. I'm not sure if I am rotating my wrist (probably not much), or if I should be, or how much it depends on the geometry of an individual's body. (As ronjazz said "there aren't any rules not made to be bent!").
    EDIT: Right or wrong, what I did take away from ronjazz's post #40 was the idea of having a target - that being the first unplayed string after the top note - and moving the pick to come to rest on the target. The wrist "flicks", but I don't know what exactly that means and how much it is custom tailored to the player. Until I learn more, my interim goal is first hitting the right notes and second fluidity and ease of motion.
    Last edited by HighSpeedSpoon; 01-08-2012 at 04:30 PM.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    Edit: wait, with the chords being played in an arc - it just occurred to me I'm not sure which way the arc goes - I mean in which dimension. Is it a rotation of the wrist or a side-to-side? I think I may have interpreted ronjazz's first explanation wrong.
    My interpretation, open to correction by Ron, is as follows: Suppose you sat your guitar down flat on its back and let a pendulum swing across the strings. If the curvature of the pendulum's arc is right, and if the height of the pendulum's arc is just right, then it will brush across exactly the desired number of strings, and it will come to rest against the very next string.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat
    My interpretation, open to correction by Ron, is as follows: Suppose you sat your guitar down flat on its back and let a pendulum swing across the strings. If the curvature of the pendulum's arc is right, and if the height of the pendulum's arc is just right, then it will brush across exactly the desired number of strings, and it will come to rest against the very next string.
    I'm a bit confused, the strings are parallel so how would an arc work?

    Also there are two ways I can think of the wrist moving. 1) as though you are waving goodbye or 2) as though you are turning a door knob (this one seems to come from the elbow). I've seen both these motions being used by guitarists.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    If anything I said sounded like recommending it for "your whole guitar career", just let me know what it was, and I'll try to be clearer in the future.
    .
    No, that's not what I meant at all!

    I think fep has summed it up nicely with the waving goodbye and turning door knob analogy. I'm not sure which of each kind of arc I should be aiming for, but right not I'm just trying to hit the right strings.

    OK, if we're moving on, then I would like to bring attention to something. Any absolute beginner may be wondering about this - if you already know, then apologies for the repetition.

    If you stick to one string, then, for the most part, there is a two-fret distance between notes. e.g. A is two frets up from G. However there are two notable exceptions: B-C and E-F. C is only one fret up from B, and F is only one fret up from E. This applies on any string, and in any octave we learn these notes.

    This probably isn't the right time to go into a big theoretical explanation, I just thought I would point out the one-fret distance between E and F on the 4th string, and now we learn the first string, and there's still just that one fret from E to F.

    So if anyone is sitting scratching their head and wondering, then yes, that's how it is, and it will all be clear later.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I'm a bit confused, the strings are parallel so how would an arc work?

    Also there are two ways I can think of the wrist moving. 1) as though you are waving goodbye or 2) as though you are turning a door knob (this one seems to come from the elbow). I've seen both these motions being used by guitarists.
    I would have inferred it to mean that (using the guitar on its back/pendulum analogy) the string on which the pick comes to rest would be at the halfway point of the pendulum swing, so that you're getting slightly more volume on each string on the way down, since each string gets slightly more pick.

    ....because he said that this technique brings out the highest pitches. I could be wrong.

    I'm envisioning forum members with pitchforks demanding a video from Ron.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    ... I think fep has summed it up nicely with the waving goodbye and turning door knob analogy. I'm not sure which of each kind of arc I should be aiming for, but right not I'm just trying to hit the right strings. ...
    Okay. I'm glad I didn't confuse.

    And yes, this is exactly where I am at, plus for all I know it could be some of both depending on the player or the circumstance.

  11. #10

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    The lowest point of the arc should be the top note of the chord.
    The arc itself is relative to the "plane" of the strings; as you make your pick-stroke, the pick hits the bottom note of the chord soft, the next note harder as the arc gets deeper into the strings, and the final note hardest and loudest, then resting against the next available string.

  12. #11

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    I may get around to doing a video this week, but most of this is from memory, since I am mostly a fingerstyle player. What we are trying to achieve here is quite difficult and really demands great focus and concentration. That's why leavitt places such importance so early, because once you get this motion into a natural reflex, your tone and dynamics will always be under control.

  13. #12

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    ten left thumbs, you can also point to the piano and see that those same notes have no black key between them. This is the key to the sound of the major do-re-mi scale.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I'm a bit confused, the strings are parallel so how would an arc work?

    Also there are two ways I can think of the wrist moving. 1) as though you are waving goodbye or 2) as though you are turning a door knob (this one seems to come from the elbow). I've seen both these motions being used by guitarists.
    This illustration is only my take on how it works, and I hope it isn't a misinterpretation of what Ron means. I think the doorknob turning motion would be closest, but of course it would come to an abrupt halt on the rest string. Just my two cents.

  15. #14

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    Here's a short video on my version of the rest stroke. I think I use the hand shake motion and it feels like the pick drops thru the strings in one motion with equal pressure. I don't see a door knob motion arc the way you guys are saying.

    But I do see a different arc with the hand shake motion. When I go down the strings, my pick does a natural arc from the front of the sound hole to the back of it... or from the neck towards the bridge. Hope that makes sense.

    Marty


  16. #15

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    Marty,

    Thank you for your demonstration. I've played rock guitar for 20 years and taught it for 11 years. I guess what I do is "free-stroke" instead of the "rest-stroke". I can play all of the triads in this section with a free-stroke, no problem. I could probably do it in my sleep. But I wanted to make sure that I was using this new rest-stroke technique properly, and your video confirmed for me that I have been.

    I'm sorry to have taken this entire thread on a rest-stroke tangent, but I hope that everybody got as much out of Marty's video as I did. I don't think that the rest-stroke is a beginner thing. Now that I know what I'm looking at, I'm positive I've seen Stephane Wrembel and other GJ'ers use it on chords. Now I can use it myself.

    Thank you so much.

    - H

  17. #16

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    Rock: Don't be sorry. Several of us had questions.

    Marty W
    : Thanks very much for the video. I think I use a combination of door-knob and hand-shake (waving bye-bye) motions. I can also see that I have been using free strokes in the past.

    ronjazz
    : I am not sure if in your experience the critical thing about rest strokes is to use a "door-knob" versus a "hand-shake" motion, or if the critical things are 1) to emphasize each string more than the last (by digging deeper with the pick) and 2) to rest on the first unplayed string. Could you please clarify?
    Last edited by HighSpeedSpoon; 01-08-2012 at 11:16 PM.

  18. #17
    I played through book 1 a good bit this afternoon. I think this rest stroke is pretty key to successfully playing the chord sections on the later material pick-style.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    ten left thumbs, you can also point to the piano and see that those same notes have no black key between them. This is the key to the sound of the major do-re-mi scale.
    You can indeed. The piano has been engineered for the convenience of western music (do-re-mi) and sadly, beginning pianists can get quite far before realising that the distance between C-D is not the same as the distance B-C. Then they get terribly confused. A guitarist has to deal with this nugget of theory right from the start, when learning notes on the fretboard.

  20. #19

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    re rest strokes and arcs: many thanks to all here for this most useful discussion, especially to strumcat (for the thumbnail) and ronjazz. I now know what I'm after.

    re hitting the right strings and getting the pick to land where you want it. Obviously the problem is, as you need this to be fast, you can't be too careful about it, so there's a lot of trial and error (my case, mostly error). It's a question of the hand feeling it's way and getting the idea for where each string is, and exactly how far to go. I do find it helpful, though, if I visualise the strings hard, mentally (not looking at them). When I imagine them clearly, I tend to get it right. If I'm distracted with rhythm, or my left hand, I make more mistakes with my rh.

  21. #20

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    oh hell, I just realized this is one of the books I've been working in, and totally missed the beginning of this thread.

    Mel Bay 1 was good prep for reading chords, better than Mel Bay 2 so far.

    IN Leavett, I'm kinda hung up in the Key of C stuff still...too many books and too little quality time.

  22. #21

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    Hi Carol, it's worth prioritising what you do, whatever that is. Still time to jump in here if you like.

  23. #22

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    I'm really excited this thread is happening. I've had Modern Method Volume 1-3 for about a year now. I've only really managed to get to around page 30 in that time. It's slow going! Started flipping forward to page 60 to see what position playing is like... Anyway, I'll stay tuned!

  24. #23

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    I've been trying out the arc technique and noticed some things. I don't know if this will make sense to anyone but me. The arc is not a semi-circle - it is quite a wide arc (look back at strumcat's thumbnail) and it stops at the half-way point - noon. Therefore you need to focus on the destination string (noon). You get your wrist to that string (whichever it is) and give a wrist flick till the wrist is straight. That way, the pick is deepest and strongest at the melody note.

    So one way to practice a chord is to play the top note first - this is your destination note. The play again, including the lower chord notes, but almost not caring about them, and land on your destination note.

    Personal update: I'm so thrilled with my rh. When I think a week ago I couldn't use it to brush my teeth or hold a kettle, and today I've played music for hours and it feels strong as anything.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    I've been trying out the arc technique and noticed some things. I don't know if this will make sense to anyone but me. The arc is not a semi-circle - it is quite a wide arc (look back at strumcat's thumbnail) and it stops at the half-way point - noon. Therefore you need to focus on the destination string (noon). You get your wrist to that string (whichever it is) and give a wrist flick till the wrist is straight. That way, the pick is deepest and strongest at the melody note.

    So one way to practice a chord is to play the top note first - this is your destination note. The play again, including the lower chord notes, but almost not caring about them, and land on your destination note.

    Personal update: I'm so thrilled with my rh. When I think a week ago I couldn't use it to brush my teeth or hold a kettle, and today I've played music for hours and it feels strong as anything.
    Hi TLT. I'm not sure if we're on the same wavelength, but I hope so. What I took away from ronjazz's post was the idea of having a target - that being the first unplayed string after the top note - and moving the pick to come to rest on the target. It sounds to me like this is what you mean by a destination, i.e., something that helps you focus on where you want to wind up. The wrist "flicks". I don't know what exactly that means. Is it a semi-circle? Well, I don't think it is for me either, but I don't know how much it's supposed to differ from one player to the next.


    PS Congrats on your RH.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    Hi TLT. I'm not sure if we're on the same wavelength, but I hope so. What I took away from ronjazz's post was the idea of having a target - that being the first unplayed string after the top note - and moving the pick to come to rest on the target.
    Sorry, that's what I meant. Pick comes to rest on the next string after the target note. I find if i focus on the note I'm trying to play, it works. The rest looks after itself. (sorry, bad pun).

    It sounds to me like this is what you mean by a destination, i.e., something that helps you focus on where you want to wind up. The wrist "flicks". I don't know what exactly that means. Is it a semi-circle? Well, I don't think it is for me either, but I don't know how much it's supposed to differ from one player to the next.
    Probably in the finer detail, it's going to change from one player to the next, and most especially, how we *think* about what we're doing.

    PS Congrats on your RH.
    thanks!

  27. #26

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    I recorded exercise 5, 6, 7, 8 on this video.

    My initial challenge was working on the rest stroke chord playing (exercises 6, 7, & 8). Then I found another challenge, muting unwanted strings from continuing to ring. For the muting I was using the pad along the edge of my right hand. The muting becomes more important when playing electric as they sustain more than acoustics.

    Critique, my chord rest strokes are clumsy in that they are too heavy handed and not fast enough. My muting is chopping the chord off too soon.


  28. #27

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    I'll try and do a recording later in the week. meanwhile I'm totally addicted to pressing on through the book, now that i can see my way to part two. What i find amazing is I go back to these first few pages - and it's still hit and miss whether I hit the right notes. Somehow the faster stuff feels easier.

  29. #28

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    I did this to a backing track. I'm muting all chords with the side of right hand for practice at that technique (night recording, lighting is weak, makes movement blurred, sorry). I went through the exercise twice on the video.

    I've attached the backing track for those that want to use it to practice with.

    Last edited by fep; 01-10-2012 at 10:40 PM.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I did this to a backing track. I'm muting all chords with the side of right hand for practice at that technique (night recording, lighting is weak, makes movement blurred, sorry). I went through the exercise twice on the video.

    I've attached the backing track for those that want to use it to practice with.

    Thanks for posting this. Some questions and comments (intermixed):
    • It sounds very nice, and thanks for the track.
    • I hear you holding the third beat of the measure longer than beats 1,2, and 4. I like your way better - it sounds more musical - but I don't think the exercise is written that way. I hope you don't mind me suggesting that in general, caution should be exercised when departing from the way an exercise is written.
    • What's up with the B natural half-note at the end of the exercise? You are playing it as a C chord, which makes sense. I have never seen this kind of marking before. The exercise wants to resolve to (end up on) the C chord, so why doesn't Leavitt just write out a C chord? The B sounds terrible to me. What am I missing?
    Thanks again.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by HighSpeedSpoon
    Thanks for posting this. Some questions and comments (intermixed):
    • It sounds very nice, and thanks for the track.
    • I hear you holding the third beat of the measure longer than beats 1,2, and 4. I like your way better - it sounds more musical - but I don't think the exercise is written that way. I hope you don't mind me suggesting that in general, caution should be exercised when departing from the way an exercise is written.
    • What's up with the B natural half-note at the end of the exercise? You are playing it as a C chord, which makes sense. I have never seen this kind of marking before. The exercise wants to resolve to (end up on) the C chord, so why doesn't Leavitt just write out a C chord? The B sounds terrible to me. What am I missing?
    Thanks again.
    I don't mind your comments at all, rather, I appreciate them. That is what this is all about. It made me go back and look at the music and give it a listen.

    I just listened and watched... It sounds and looks to me that I'm holding both the 1 and the 3 longer as I'm choking off the 2 and 4. I could be wrong but that's what I hear and what I was trying to do. The muting with the side of my hand like this is new for me, I wishh I could choke it off for less of a duration like a sixteenth note. But it's a pretty fast move. It's quick and actually hard to see in the video, but concentrate on my right hand and you might be able to make it out.

    And that is the way it's written. The commas in the notation indicate that the chords should be choked off and therefore sounded less than the full value of the quarter notes (those slashes stand for playing the chords as quarter note rhythmic values).

    The last "note" isn't a note at all, that large diamond is a chord rhythmic value and it means to hold the chord for the length of a half note (two beats in this case).

  32. #31

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    About the 1 and 3: Yes, it is written that way. FWIW I heard the recording a little differently from you, although it was hard for me to pick the guitar out from the rest of the mix.

    About the diamond: My copy does not have a diamond!! It has a garden variety half note. Here is an excerpt scanned from my book:




    I guess one runs into that. Well, as my daddy used to say: I'm glad we had this chat.


    Thank you Frank.
    Last edited by HighSpeedSpoon; 01-11-2012 at 08:51 AM.

  33. #32

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    HSS - looks like you've got yourself a typo there. That's supposed to be a diamond shaped sign, which just happens to live on the middle line. Someone or something has seen it and reprinted it as a B.

    That would sound fairly awful as a B.

  34. #33

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    Actually, I like the sound of that B when (incorrectly) I allow the C chord to continue to resonate - the resulting CMaj7 chord is one of my personal favourites! But even when played as written, I still like the B... just me of course.

  35. #34

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    Thanks guys for the clarification on the rest stroke, it made me realise I overlooked that technique part of the method. I'm note sure I would have understood it correctly without the infos on this thread...

    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Then I found another challenge, muting unwanted strings from continuing to ring. For the muting I was using the pad along the edge of my right hand. The muting becomes more important when playing electric as they sustain more than acoustics.
    Definitely a challenge! I'll try that right hand method, even though I'm pretty sure it looks easier than it really is to accomplish. Anyway, challenges bring improvement, so it's all good!

    However, there is one bothering thing concerning the diamond you were discussing (I can't read videos for the moment unfortunately, I guess fep's vid settles the matter, sorry to bother but I can't wait to know...):

    - Does it mean that we need to hold the previous chord played for 2 more beats? In that case the second chord would last for 3 beats.
    - Or does it tell us to actually play a third chord that lasts for 2 beats? In this case there are 3 chords played for that measure.

    [By the way, just to let you know, I've changed my nickname (it previously was lvdz), I'm not crashing in this thread like hair in the soup (literraly translated)]

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aant
    However, there is one bothering thing concerning the diamond you were discussing (I can't read videos for the moment unfortunately, I guess fep's vid settles the matter, sorry to bother but I can't wait to know...):

    - Does it mean that we need to hold the previous chord played for 2 more beats? In that case the second chord would last for 3 beats.
    - Or does it tell us to actually play a third chord that lasts for 2 beats? In this case there are 3 chords played for that measure.
    "Hair in the soup." I've never heard that one, I like it.

    That last measure is three strums of the C chord on the 1 2 and 3, the last strum is held for two beats.

    This type of rhythm notation is often referred to as "Rhythm Slashes". Below are two examples of noteheads for rhythm slashes. It seems Leavitt uses the type in the first stave, I like the noteheads in the 2nd stave better. Both of these staves are played exactly the same.

  37. #36

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    Okay. I looked a few dozen pages ahead and saw the proper diamond notation on pages 30, 43, and 45 of my edition, which I bought some years ago. (I don't remember how many years.) Am I the only one with this typo on page 11? :
    Thanks guys.

  38. #37

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    fep, as an already accomplished guitarist, you show a lot of leadership (and guts) by learning a new technique with the pick and putting it out there on video. Thanks for sticking with us while we bumble through the slow process of learning to read. Oh, and I, too, noticed the motto at the end of your videos. Cats can't wag that well, but I will try to purr more.

    HelpImARock, well, that's what I should be doing, putting some recordings online. I notice you play the chords in one quick stroke, right on time. I tend to play them as more of a quick strum, with the last note the "on-time" note. I'd be interested in hearing comments on whether I should be trying to do it more like HIAR.

    TenLeftThumbs, you're a trooper, and your good attitude and enthusiasm is carrying a lot of us right along with you. I'm glad your right hand is behaving better.

    Is everybody practicing?

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat

    HelpImARock, well, that's what I should be doing, putting some recordings online. I notice you play the chords in one quick stroke, right on time. I tend to play them as more of a quick strum, with the last note the "on-time" note. I'd be interested in hearing comments on whether I should be trying to do it more like HIAR.
    i was under the impression that we're supposed to post our exercises so that we can get help on them. maybe i'm doing something that sounds right to me, but is completely wrong. otherwise, it seems (to me) that these threads would be less effective.

    as for the strumming, what do you mean by the last note being "on-time". to my ears, it's slightly behind because i'm playing triads instead of whacking through 5 or 6 strings.

    i teach my rock guitar students to strum from the wrist and not push through the strings from the elbow. eventually you get to the point where you're picking with your thumb instead of the wrist. what i'm trying to do in these examples is play rest strokes instead of free strokes. but that only changes where the pick ends up, not the strumming motion.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs
    Nah! Dinnae fesh.

    Do you ever use a metronome?
    always.

    i record straight to Garageband and use the built in metronome. but it doesn't print to the recording.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty W
    Overall your stuff sounds fine to me. Sometimes the chords could be smoother and are a little loud compared to the single notes ...imo. But so are mine! It's a tough technique and the more I think about it the harder it seems.
    interesting. i've always found that chords are louder than single notes. that's why we have boost pedals for solos.

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock!
    interesting. i've always found that chords are louder than single notes. that's why we have boost pedals for solos.
    Right, 6 strings are louder than 1 string in a band situation. What I meant was for chord melody, where a solo guitarist includes small chords as part of the melody. To my ears you have to strum the chords a little lighter to blend together with the notes.

    Btw... the tough technique I was talking about is the rest stroke.
    Last edited by Marty W; 01-12-2012 at 08:18 PM.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat
    Is everybody practicing?
    Yes, practicing. Just not posting too much. School is back in session. I'm taking 15 hours. Between school, full time job, and having 4 kids (one is 3.5 months old) I don't have a lot of time to post but yes to practicing.

    Fep thanks for the reggae Mon. I got here and found the backing track. Nice.

  44. #43

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    Ok so I've decided to join in the fun and recorded One Two Three Four duet on page 10 - 11.

    My comments - a few warts and timing is off again at the end - I blame the metronome!!

    Here is the link:
    2012_01_13_Leavitt_OneTwoThreeFour.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    cheers,
    fs

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty W
    Right, 6 strings are louder than 1 string in a band situation. What I meant was for chord melody, where a solo guitarist includes small chords as part of the melody. To my ears you have to strum the chords a little lighter to blend together with the notes.

    Btw... the tough technique I was talking about is the rest stroke.
    the rest stroke is definitely tough. i've not had much success with it.

    thanks for the feedback on the chords. what's interesting to me is that i've actively stayed away from hybrid picking the chords because i want to get the rest stroke down. the hybrid picking definitely makes things more balanced, but it's not the technique we're after here. but i'll work on the dynamics. i didn't really know what we were going for here, so i appreciate your responses.


  46. #45

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    Yep me too, that's my main critique with this recording, the rest stroke chords are a bit raggedy, Ann.


  47. #46

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    Start the chords studies by playing smoothly and evenly, with the top note of the chord being the loudest. The problem to solve is this: when playing chords with a pick, you are always doing an arpeggio, never actually playing all notes at once. As your aim and control improves, you can increase the speed of the stroke so that your arpeggio is so quick that it sounds almost like you're plucking with fingers. A small psychological trick is to time your stroke so that the final, or melody, note comes on the beat. In other words, anticipate slightly, starting your stroke a little before the metronome ticks. To hear this in practice, play the chord sequence in question just using the top notes, then play the sequence with the full chords; the melody should remain rhythmically in the same place. I can recommend listening carefully to the early plectrum stylists, from Van Eps to Eddie Lang, Art Ryerson, Dick McDonough, etc., and also more modern players such as Barney Kessel and Johnny Smith.

  48. #47

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    I recorded your C-diddy last night. Here is the link if you want to take a listen.

    2012_01_12_StrumCat_CDitty.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    It's a bit to slow in the beginning, I was trying to emphasize the low C's as a sort of drone...Anyway I like the tune too.

    Cheers,
    fs

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Yep me too, that's my main critique with this recording, the rest stroke chords are a bit raggedy, Ann.

    If you say so We can use this video for reference anyway...

    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat
    I gave "One, Two, Three, Four" a shot too.

    leavitt-vol1-pg10-1234.mp3 by Strumcat on SoundCloud - Create, record and share your sounds for free
    Sounds very good as well, even though the E note at the beginning of measure 5 for instance is barely hearable, not too sure why... The chords sound very good also, very neat.

    Quote Originally Posted by fs
    I recorded your C-diddy last night. Here is the link if you want to take a listen.

    2012_01_12_StrumCat_CDitty.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    It's a bit to slow in the beginning, I was trying to emphasize the low C's as a sort of drone...Anyway I like the tune too.

    Cheers,
    fs
    Yes ok, a bit slow at the beginning but the overall feeling of the piece is very well rendered, that song definitely sounds good with an acoustic! Nice interpretation.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    Start the chords studies by playing smoothly and evenly, with the top note of the chord being the loudest. The problem to solve is this: when playing chords with a pick, you are always doing an arpeggio, never actually playing all notes at once. As your aim and control improves, you can increase the speed of the stroke so that your arpeggio is so quick that it sounds almost like you're plucking with fingers. A small psychological trick is to time your stroke so that the final, or melody, note comes on the beat. In other words, anticipate slightly, starting your stroke a little before the metronome ticks. To hear this in practice, play the chord sequence in question just using the top notes, then play the sequence with the full chords; the melody should remain rhythmically in the same place. I can recommend listening carefully to the early plectrum stylists, from Van Eps to Eddie Lang, Art Ryerson, Dick McDonough, etc., and also more modern players such as Barney Kessel and Johnny Smith.
    Thanks for clarifying this for us.

    I recorded the duet also, here I give the two parts separately so anyone can play along (the dvd is better, but not everyone has it)
    one two three four pt 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    one two three four pt 2.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    The mistakes are quite noticeable. I did my favourite booboo of sticking an open string D under the F chord, making it a much more dramatic Dmin7. Hey, I suppose there is a D in the 2nd guitar part, nevertheless, I *am* trying to play what is written, but this is one mistake my fingers make so consistently I am beginning to wonder if they do it deliberately.

    I could have done it again, and I would just put the mistakes in different places, so I figured I would call it a day.

    Also, pg 11:
    pg 11 rhythm.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    I am really impressed with everyone else's recordings. Strumcat's duet in particular has fallen short of his promise that, by comparison, I would be able to feel great about mine.

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by ronjazz
    Start the chords studies by playing smoothly and evenly, with the top note of the chord being the loudest. The problem to solve is this: when playing chords with a pick, you are always doing an arpeggio, never actually playing all notes at once. As your aim and control improves, you can increase the speed of the stroke so that your arpeggio is so quick that it sounds almost like you're plucking with fingers. A small psychological trick is to time your stroke so that the final, or melody, note comes on the beat. In other words, anticipate slightly, starting your stroke a little before the metronome ticks. To hear this in practice, play the chord sequence in question just using the top notes, then play the sequence with the full chords; the melody should remain rhythmically in the same place. I can recommend listening carefully to the early plectrum stylists, from Van Eps to Eddie Lang, Art Ryerson, Dick McDonough, etc., and also more modern players such as Barney Kessel and Johnny Smith.
    Sounds good Ron. I'll add that the top note of the chord should be loudest but only as loud as the rest of the melody.

    To anyone that's having trouble. Play an open G note a few times, then quickly strum a C triad (CEG on 543 strings) resting on the 2nd string, making the top note open G. Try to get the single note G to match the rest stroke/strum G.

    Playing the 5th & 4th strings softer than the 3rd string can help but takes a lot of control.