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  1. #151
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    Dang near perfect, bro. Keep it up! Remember to review the other lessons, a page or so a day.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Dang near perfect, bro. Keep it up! Remember to review the other lessons, a page or so a day.
    Thanks again. When I listen to it, it sounds like it's going to break every moment. The notes don't come out very confident. Is that because I'm listening to myself?

    Good that you keep brining up the reviewing, I've been avoiding that thusfar

  3. #153
    You should be listening to yourself. That is how you get better. You just need to get use to the exercise. It will come out more clearly with continued practice.
    "If I don't practice for a day, I know it... for two days, the critics know it... three days, the public knows it." -- Louis Armstrong

  4. #154
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    Computer crashed had to reinstall a few times. That and for exercise 8 struggling very hard to strum 3 specific strings without looking and without hitting adjecent strings.

    I finally got myself a take doing ex8 on my acoustic with .11 strings and a recorder. Making it an even better exercise for obvious reasons.

    Had to amp the volume in garageband a little bit. Hope it's not too overwhelming now.

    Here it is
    mmg vol1 ex8 dropbox link

  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langs View Post
    Computer crashed had to reinstall a few times. That and for exercise 8 struggling very hard to strum 3 specific strings without looking and without hitting adjecent strings.

    I finally got myself a take doing ex8 on my acoustic with .11 strings and a recorder. Making it an even better exercise for obvious reasons.

    Had to amp the volume in garageband a little bit. Hope it's not too overwhelming now.

    Here it is
    mmg vol1 ex8 dropbox link
    Sounds good! Picking "chords" inside, without playing unwanted strings, is where the rest stroke becomes crucial. Make sure you're doing it right, as it's a cornerstone of good pick technique, imho. If you aren't sure about it, get the DVD version and watch the guy (Larry) over and over.

    Post more!

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Picking "chords" inside, without playing unwanted strings, is where the rest stroke becomes crucial. Make sure you're doing it right
    I actually found out yesterday what rest strokes are exactly. Funny because I thought rest strokes would be 'cheating'. What I did instead with practicing have my strum be pure control of motion without relying on anything external not even having my pick rest on the string below the last one played.

    So in all honesty the rest stroke doesn't seem like a real challenge at the moment.

    What IS a challenge though is getting the chord change clean and with one snap at the beginning of 'one, two three, four' with the thumb behind the neck. I'm feeling like I need to nail 100bpm this time before moving on. Tonight I'm having another 30mins reserved for MMG, so hopefully a decent take will come out of it.

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langs View Post
    I actually found out yesterday what rest strokes are exactly. Funny because I thought rest strokes would be 'cheating'. What I did instead with practicing have my strum be pure control of motion without relying on anything external not even having my pick rest on the string below the last one played.

    So in all honesty the rest stroke doesn't seem like a real challenge at the moment.

    What IS a challenge though is getting the chord change clean and with one snap at the beginning of 'one, two three, four' with the thumb behind the neck. I'm feeling like I need to nail 100bpm this time before moving on. Tonight I'm having another 30mins reserved for MMG, so hopefully a decent take will come out of it.
    Sounds as though you're one of the lucky ones whose rest stroke comes naturally. This is not unheard of - I know a couple of guys who "rest" naturally after every downstroke.

    I don't understand what you mean by "getting the chord change clean with one snap....at the beginning...

    Are you talking about left-hand technique now? Or still with right hand? If you're talking about the quick right-hand "strum-rest" that happens right at a quick chord change, I'd say the only medicine for that is slow practice. Practice one change slowly, over and over, slowing down to a snail's pace if you have to, to get it clean. There's a couple of YouTube videos about making clean chord changes... I don't have the URLs, but they're easy to find. Jody Fisher teaches one of them.

    If I'm misunderstanding, you might post a video showing what you're talking about -- if this technique is a considerable problem for you, I mean.

    "Nailing it at 100 bpm before going on..." Yes, we need those types of goals at times, but recall Leavitt's rule: don't hold yourself to mastery of each thing before plowing forth. You "nail" the stuff during review, days and weeks and months down the road. However, use whatever criteria you like for signalling time to move on to a new thing. I wouldn't make "mastery" one of them, however! : )

    kj

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Sounds as though you're one of the lucky ones whose rest stroke comes naturally.
    kj
    Oh but that is not what I was trying to say. What I was trying to get at is this: I started practicing my right to strum inner groups of 3 strings while just having my right hand floating, period. So no pivoting, resting anything. Having done that for a while, the rest stroke didn't feel like a nuissance to add to my right hand. But I'm pretty sure my rest stroke as in technique is quite poor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Practice one change slowly, over and over, slowing down to a snail's pace if you have to, to get it clean
    kj
    Never heard anyone say that

    Anyway, The snap thing: I mean my left hand. Yesterday the entire 30 min went into practicing that again. Watching a lot of pebberbrown video's on youtube will to that to somebody.

    Mastering the excersise as a goal: I tried setting a time constraint on each lesson as a goal instead of mastering at a certain speed. I guess that would work if I wasn't recording. So the problem is I just can't get myself to upload a recording with nasty stuff sticking out like a sore thumb. To my own ears of course. For a lot of people, I will have done nothing but that
    Last edited by Langs; 12-28-2012 at 03:15 AM.

  9. #159
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    The rhythm accompaniment:



    This recording is loud + I'm using too thick of a pick for pure strumming. Above all my strumming is way too harsh as a technique as well. The difficulty here seems to be graceful strumming while keeping in time + muting not too abrupt and in time as well

  10. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langs View Post
    The rythm accompaniment:

    This recording is loud + I'm using too thick of a pick for pure strumming. Above all my strumming is way too harsh as a technique as well. The difficulty here seems to be graceful strumming while keeping in time + muting not too abrupt and in time as well
    Hey Langs -- the strums aren't too loud, imo. One thing to work on (and it takes some work) is using a heavy pick to strum softly, to strum medium, loud, and all points in between. Almost without exception, jazz and swing guys use big heavy picks, because, for one thing, more control can be had from a stiff pick that from one that bends. When a pick bends, that's motion you can't control.

    Same for playing the fast lead lines. The trick is developing your wrist, or arm, so you can play at any dynamic level - loud, soft, whatever. Practice strumming with the pick held so loose that you might actually drop it sometimes. See how soft the sound is? You'll find that playing louder is really just a matter of gripping the pick tighter. The variation in dynamics is less predictable with a thinner pick, because you aren't in control of the pick's bending. A heavy pick doesn't bend, so you get total control of what goes on. : )

    Your time is very good. Just hang in with Leavitt and you'll be fine. Mess around with some jazz tunes, too - comp through them as slowly as you have to and always use a metronome.

  11. #161
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    I've been playing heavy pick exclusively for so long that I though I could afford playing a pick that flexes for strumming. But I can't and you're absolutely right: it's purely an indication of technique that needs work, nothing else.

    As for metronome: The quicktime recordings that are otherwise awesome in easy of use, they don't include the click that I'm recording to (click comes out of my amp model software). For the record; I never ever practice without a metronome (what tels you I don't?).
    Last edited by Langs; 01-04-2013 at 08:42 AM.

  12. #162
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    Ex 8, P.9.

    Thought I'd record it just because I like it (and wanted an excuse to use my new mic boom - makes things easier!)

    I'm surprised at the delay in my change from C to F, I'd have sworn it was on time - the benefit of recording oneself :-)

    http://www.soundclick.com/player/sin...&q=hi&newref=1
    Last edited by michael-m; 12-21-2013 at 03:27 PM.

  13. #163
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    P. 8, Ex 5: http://www.soundclick.com/player/sin...&q=hi&newref=1


    P. 8, Ex 6: http://www.soundclick.com/player/sin...&q=hi&newref=1


    Quite a motivational tool this recording :-)
    Last edited by michael-m; 12-17-2013 at 05:49 PM.

  14. #164
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    "This book has been specifically designed to accomplish two things:

    1. To teach the student to read music."

    I must remember this.
    I must remember this.
    I must remember this...

    I'm almost afraid to play something without recording in case I get it right. Yet if I record my playing, I invariably get it wrong!

    P.9, Ex 7.
    http://www.soundclick.com/player/sin...&q=hi&newref=1

  15. #165
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  16. #166
    Hey all, I just started going through this book last week and decided I had been start posting recordings! This is an 80 BPM recording of both parts of One Two Three Four duet. Self-critique: with the chords, I was trying to concentrate on a quick, clear stroke and not having space between notes. Sometimes I forget about the rest stroke and have to focus on it. For the melody part, I was just trying to be as consistent as possible.

    edited with a much better recording... https://app.box.com/s/2f4kbsk84nemrp52srr6
    Last edited by thetruewheel; 02-08-2014 at 04:55 PM.

  17. #167
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    Nice job! Good tone with the pick and good timing. The rest strokes will come with a bit of practice. You might want to jump ahead and start work on the solo in F - lots of practice there for rest strokes in chords (resting on the top note in the chord.)

    I think only two people have posted this whole book; maybe you'll be the third? (I did 10% or so; still want to do the rest eventually.)

    Good recording job, too - post more!

    vj/kj
    Last edited by Kojo27; 02-08-2014 at 09:30 PM.

  18. #168
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    Hey truewheel,

    Very even sounding, tone is great! Plus both guitars seem spot on timing-wise and sound remarkably well 'together' to my ears.

  19. #169
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    I'm feeling inclined to re-port my material here since I changed youtube acccounts and things got a little messed up. Anyway here's are the most reviews I recorded

    Ex5:


    Ex6:


    Ex7:


    Ex8:


    One, two, three, four (last review I recorded):
    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/...%2C%20four.mp3

    Self critique; especially the last one (one, two, three, four) - EVERYTHING
    But, like you, michael-m I just needed to remember that recording pretty versions is secondary. I needed something on tape and move on. The recording button truly messes with my brain really bad.
    Last edited by Langs; 02-09-2014 at 09:04 AM.

  20. #170
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    Quote Originally Posted by Langs View Post
    Hey truewheel,

    Very even sounding, tone is great! Plus both guitars seem spot on timing-wise and sound remarkably well 'together' to my ears.
    I agree - sounds good to me.

  21. #171
    Another one, for fun with recording equipment...
    Attached Files Attached Files

  22. #172

    Exercises 7 & 8

    I have been reviewing all material up to an including these exercises. The 3 note stacks in these exercises are getting easier for my eyes to recognize. I no longer have to really think about the notes in the stacks and then think about where they are on the fingerboard. My fingers go to them, at least in the first position. I am also trying to work on my rest stroke. I have been using hybrid picking when playing the 3 note stacks. Not sure if I am using the correct term in calling them 3 note stacks. I guess I should call them triads and triad inversions. I like how Leavitt introduces us to triad inversions without calling them inversions. I don't know much about inversions but what I basically understand about them is the notes played are the same just the notes change order. C-E-G, E-G-C, G-C-E, etc... Obviously there is more to it than that but like I said earlier this is my basic understanding of them.

    Exercise #7 - 100 bpm

    Exercise #8 - 100 bpm
    Last edited by georgebanketas; 01-20-2019 at 07:35 AM.

  23. #173
    Still need a ton more work with the metronome. I am rushing some parts and in others I am behind the beat. Obviously when played separately it is hard to tell. Once I put the two tracks together then my timing issues are magnified. I am tapping my foot along with the click. I am trying to have the down stroke for the quarter notes in sync with my foot which should be in sync with the metronome. I hear and feel that it is but apparently I am wrong. Lol.

    One, Two, Three, Four Guitar #1 - @ 100bpm

    One, Two, Three, Four Guitar #2 - @ 100bpm

    One, Two, Three, Four (Duet) - @ 100bpm

  24. #174
    Quote Originally Posted by georgebanketas View Post
    I have been reviewing all material up to an including these exercises. The 3 note stacks in these exercises are getting easier for my eyes to recognize. I no longer have to really think about the notes in the stacks and then think about where they are on the fingerboard. My fingers go to them, at least in the first position. I am also trying to work on my rest stroke. I have been using hybrid picking when playing the 3 note stacks. Not sure if I am using the correct term in calling them 3 note stacks. I guess I should call them triads and triad inversions. I like how Leavitt introduces us to triad inversions without calling them inversions. I don't know much about inversions but what I basically understand about them is the notes played are the same just the notes change order. C-E-G, E-G-C, G-C-E, etc... Obviously there is more to it than that but like I said earlier this is my basic understanding of them.

    Exercise #7 - 100 bpm

    Exercise #8 - 100 bpm
    Sounds good George.

    And yes, inversions might be voiced exactly like that but can be voiced differently too (open voicing, doubling of some voices, etc.) It refers to the note in the bass not being the root of the chord.

  25. #175
    Quote Originally Posted by Langs View Post
    Computer crashed had to reinstall a few times. That and for exercise 8 struggling very hard to strum 3 specific strings without looking and without hitting adjecent strings.

    I finally got myself a take doing ex8 on my acoustic with .11 strings and a recorder. Making it an even better exercise for obvious reasons.

    Had to amp the volume in garageband a little bit. Hope it's not too overwhelming
    Pnr Status TextNow VPN now.

    Here it is

    mmg vol1 ex8 dropbox link
    hi
    Sounds great! Picking "harmonies" inside, without playing undesirable strings, is the place the rest stroke ends up pivotal. Ensure you're doing it appropriate, as it's a foundation of good pick system
    all bests
    Last edited by klimbo; 01-24-2019 at 03:29 AM.

  26. #176
    Quote Originally Posted by klimbo View Post
    hi
    Sounds great! Picking "harmonies" inside, without playing undesirable strings, is the place the rest stroke ends up pivotal. Ensure you're doing it appropriate, as it's a foundation of good pick system
    all bests

    that was in 2012, lol.

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