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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by leonard_c View Post
    Ok, my initial impression of MM1 in one word: FRUSTRATION! It feels like learning to walk or talk from scratch. The closest thing I can compare it to is learning a foreign language or computer programming. However, the satisfaction of playing music notation is great, even if they are only simple exercises and it's cool to see how simple stuff can still sound good, plus it has opened up a new dimension in music for me. Keep up the good work everybody!
    Man, you took the words right out of my mouth...

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    I know this is going to sound trite, but, the steepest part of the learning curve in learning to read music is right at the beginning.
    Bless you for saying that! It gives me hope...

    Reminds me of when I'm trying to teach someone to play guitar, and I say something foolish, like, "Just put this finger here and that finger there and play the notes cleanly without any buzzing or muting... it's easy." And of course it's *not* easy at first, and it wasn't for me, either. (And still isn't, sometimes )

  4. #103

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    This book is really tough if you're completely new to reading music. You might supplement with something like Mel Bay if you don't read in first position already. These aren't "simple exercises" by the standards of most beginning readers.
    The traditional Mel Bay book is frustrating as well. I recommend the Expanded edition, which has twice the number of exercises. I found the DVD worthless though the CD was helpful.
    "Love the game, and the game will love you back" - Andre Dawson

  5. #104

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    Ron's exercise is an excellent way to build muscle memory. Once you feel comfortable with it, there are two things that I used to add to keep my students motivated to continue doing it. I'll offer the exercises here, but as with everything else and to Ron's point about feeling ambitious, they should only be started when you're ready.

    First extension: simply play the notes slowly IN TIME and say or better, sing, the note names. This will help with mastering the names of each note on each string. I'd start this initially only in one position (for example the tenth suggested by Ron).

    Second extension: This is challenging. Use different finger permutations, for example, starting at the tenth fret, play finger one (10), then finger three (12), then finger two (11), and finally finger four (13). Believe me - this is an exercise which I do daily now to try to make the right fingers walk!

    Composing tunes is a great idea. I'll commit to doing one but it'll take a few days as I generally have to type out every note using a graphics programme so it's not very efficient :-)

    To Frank and Ron - it is a real challenge to NOT use alternate picking! Also, as I used to continuously lose my pick when playing on stage, I sort of gave up and work almost exclusively with the fingers. I never mastered hybrid picking, and when I first go to see Mark Knopfler, I decided that it was way out of my league. So here, I'll be trying (again) to learn to use the pick properly, and if not, I guess I'll use thumb and or fingers. Ron, what were you referring to when you mentioned that down picking would be useful later on?

  6. #105

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    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa536 View Post
    What I did notice is how even and clean your picking sounds - not so for yours truly. I don't even hit the correct string sometimes, and other times the attack sounds either heavy handed, or like a near miss, or as though the pick is scraping the string.__________________

    I hit the wrong string, hit the right one but fret the wrong one, both hit *and* fret the wrong one together, and separate. Sometimes I think my mistakes sound better than what's written.

    It does get easier, though, so does the evenness. Just be glad you're not learning violin - sounds much worse at the scratchy stage (apologies to anyone learning violin).
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post

    Composing tunes is a great idea. I'll commit to doing one but it'll take a few days as I generally have to type out every note using a graphics programme so it's not very efficient :-)
    Better yet, here's an idea. I strongly suggest everyone learning to read, do some writing. Don't use software, download some manuscript paper

    (e.g. here http://www.take-a-piano-sheet-music-...es/bsm_6st.pdf)

    It's a better exercise that way.

    this is so much like learning a language - and no one learning a language *just* reads - they also write. If anyone writes and scans, I'm happy to give feedback.

    Tips for writing:
    • Use pencil not pen, have a rubber handy.
    • Start with a simple, 4 bar phrase.
    • End on a C (high or low, lasting two or four beats)
    • Get the treble clef right by hooking the middle bit around the G-line (that treble clef is an old G anyway, so this helps you remember G)
    • Stick to 4 beats in a bar, make sure they all add up.
    • Get the stems right - notes should look like p or d
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  8. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock! View Post
    The traditional Mel Bay book is frustrating as well. I recommend the Expanded edition, which has twice the number of exercises. I found the DVD worthless though the CD was helpful.
    +1. The new edition gives a many more reps for each new two or three-note segment that's introduced. This is key if your starting out and want to really internalize each note.

  9. #108

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post
    Ron's exercise is an excellent way to build muscle memory. Once you feel comfortable with it, there are two things that I used to add to keep my students motivated to continue doing it. I'll offer the exercises here, but as with everything else and to Ron's point about feeling ambitious, they should only be started when you're ready.

    First extension: simply play the notes slowly IN TIME and say or better, sing, the note names. This will help with mastering the names of each note on each string. I'd start this initially only in one position (for example the tenth suggested by Ron).

    Second extension: This is challenging. Use different finger permutations, for example, starting at the tenth fret, play finger one (10), then finger three (12), then finger two (11), and finally finger four (13). Believe me - this is an exercise which I do daily now to try to make the right fingers walk!

    Composing tunes is a great idea. I'll commit to doing one but it'll take a few days as I generally have to type out every note using a graphics programme so it's not very efficient :-)

    To Frank and Ron - it is a real challenge to NOT use alternate picking! Also, as I used to continuously lose my pick when playing on stage, I sort of gave up and work almost exclusively with the fingers. I never mastered hybrid picking, and when I first go to see Mark Knopfler, I decided that it was way out of my league. So here, I'll be trying (again) to learn to use the pick properly, and if not, I guess I'll use thumb and or fingers. Ron, what were you referring to when you mentioned that down picking would be useful later on?
    Tony, I will be adding those "permutations" as we go along, it's really very early for most of us to try different combinations, but you're right, there are several fingerings for this exercise. Keep the first finger on the string until you finish with it, though, that's important. As far as the downstrokes go, playing only downstrokes on quarter notes will coordinate your pick with your tapping foot, which will lead to alternate picking on 1/8 notes pretty soon. Alternate picking combined with "silent" picking will eventually prove very helpful in reading dotted rhythms and syncopation, as the pick will act as a secondary metronome. Take a half-note, for instance: pick down to strike the note, up (missing the string) for "and", down (missing the string) for 2, up (missing the string) for and, then hit the string on the next downstroke for the next note. If you tap a foot while playing, your pick will mirror your foot.

  10. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post
    Composing tunes is a great idea. I'll commit to doing one but it'll take a few days as I generally have to type out every note using a graphics programme so it's not very efficient :-)
    In my opinion... One thing I'd say about writing little tunes like we've proposed, don't get hung up on how good they are. Quantity over quality at this point.

    MuseScore is a free music notation software/shareware that I really like. It works very similar to the expensive Sibelius software.

    http://musescore.org/

    I avoid writing music by hand. I do sometimes for a bar or a few bars if a computer isn't available, just as a memory jogger. I've gone through four semesters of Music Theory and four semesters of Ear Training, I've written enough by hand for a life time.

    Reading between the lines of TTL's post were she recommended that you write music with a pen and paper. I'm guessing she is recommending that so that you'll learn the various rules that a software program will automatically do for you. Like, stem directions, bar subdivisions, etc.

    If I'm an example, my hand written music is a bit sloppy and hard to read. My software written music, beautiful looking. There are so many advantages to writing using software; speed, feedback, copy and pasting, etc. There can be frustrations though, related to the learning curve.
    Last edited by fep; 01-04-2012 at 12:16 PM.

  11. #110

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    My humble music offering...

  12. #111

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    I guess that, like me, TLT is a Brit (or of Brit descent) - rubber = eraser for those who don't know :-) Writing music isn't THAT much fun! Well, not all the time...

    Ron, I'm sticking with the down picking when I force myself to. It's not that easy after so many years of alternate picking!

    Frank - thanks for the link - I downloaded Muse and got the hang of it very quickly. So here's my tune "C-Saw". I'd forgotten how long it takes to compose music! However, I should say that I did not follow any specific structure, but just played with chords and a few variations. Some of the chords may look complicated at first, but they are an excellent way to work on some of the sight-reading skills, even if it requires slowing down a little before carrying on.

    I still cannot get my sound interface to function, so I can't get audio up yet but I will record this as soon as I'm able. In the meantime, if it would help Muse does allow me to create a midi file - but that feels like cheating.

  13. #112

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    Strumcat - that's nice enough and I enjoyed the two-note intervals. without anyway to record myself (still), I tried playing the two parts at the same time, but there are a couple of measures where this requires playing the bass D on the fifth string - but that was very enjoyable if a bit of a stretch! Good job.

  14. #113

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    Frank - just listened to Ho ho Ho. It doesn't come across as sloppy as you might think - it's actually darned good, very melodic and structured.

  15. #114

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    wow, I can see everyone's been busy. My contribution for today is fep's ho ho ho duet. I recorded the first part, then recorded the second part on top (probably not the best way to do it...)

    ho down duet.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Nice going, fep, it's all good practice.

    Well-guessed, Tony, I'm Scottish. Eraser is a word that doesn't come naturally to me.

    To reply to fep, I am absolutely suggesting paper and pencil, rather than software to those who are new to music-reading. The reason? First, software does so much of it for you. Second, reading is all about instantly recognising, and that is a *passive* activity - but writing is an *active* activity, so by writing, you can make the notes your own.

    I want to write a G, so I need to think about where the G goes and put my circle in the right spot. I need to deal with how big to make the circle, and getting the line through the middle, and working out which way to put the stem. (With my software, I type G and the software does it for me).

    we don't need to make fabulous compositions, but stringing a few notes together, making them obey the rules, then playing them, and hearing what they sound like - I think it's a good idea.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  16. #115

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    First let me say thanks to everyone participating in this and for the great contributions so far, especially to FEP for getting it up and running. I've now got the Vols 1,2 & 3 combined version and look forward to joining in.

    For those like me struggling to memorise the fretboard you can download a free simple trainer here : Fretboard Warrior

    If you want to spend some money there are more complicated and comprehensive programmes out there e.g.
    Absolute Fretboard - Learning Method And Training Software For Guitar And Bass
    and no doubt others. I use the simple fretboard trainer and I'm getting there slowly !

  17. #116

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    Just to say I think both C stroll and C-saw are great! Well done to Strumcat and Tony. They follow the rules and I really like the harmonies.

    I recorded C stroll (just worked out how to mix and align tracks in audacity):
    C stroll.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Apologies for the inaccuracies in picking, twas the best I could do! I will try to record C saw tomorrow.

    My update: I find I can now play without pain so I think the acute problem with my r thumb is over. However, the whole thing has left me very careful about rh technique, and I am careful now to hold my rh straight and relaxed, not to let it anchor *anywhere* for the sake of accuracy. This leaves me picking a lot of wrong strings but i would rather make mistakes than screw up my hand again.

    I'm also rationing practice time.

    I'm just glad I can play, really, I am.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  18. #117

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    I've recorded Cstroll as well, hope I did it justice. Nice contribution strumcat:

    Cstroll

    However I couldn't manage to record Garage Band's metronome (set at 80 bpm). Rhythm mistakes are detectable anyway.

  19. #118

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    this didn't turn out as well as i wanted it to. if you listened to each track seperately, you'd say "ok, good job except maybe for that one mistake over there." but put together, they sound a little seasick in spots (pun intended).

    i'm not going to re-record this right now. but it's entirely possible that i will down the line if it bugs me enough.

    http://db.tt/R42LLzC9
    "Love the game, and the game will love you back" - Andre Dawson

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by lvdz View Post
    I've recorded Cstroll as well, hope I did it justice. Nice contribution strumcat:

    Cstroll

    However I couldn't manage to record Garage Band's metronome (set at 80 bpm). Rhythm mistakes are detectable anyway.
    i've not been successful at recording the click either.
    "Love the game, and the game will love you back" - Andre Dawson

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post
    Strumcat - that's nice enough and I enjoyed the two-note intervals. without anyway to record myself (still), I tried playing the two parts at the same time, but there are a couple of measures where this requires playing the bass D on the fifth string - but that was very enjoyable if a bit of a stretch! Good job.
    If you can play both parts at the same time, you're doing better than me. Thanks. There are some dissonances in it, but I kind of like certain dissonances. I know how frustrating the audio problems can be. I've just had to move everything over to my laptop for that reason. So good luck on that. Glad to see you participating and in the swing of things.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    I recorded C stroll (just worked out how to mix and align tracks in audacity):
    C stroll.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Apologies for the inaccuracies in picking, twas the best I could do! I will try to record C saw tomorrow.
    I think you're doing great. Both right-hand and left-hand coordination will improve with practice. I wish I had half your determination, self-discipline, and musical knowledge.

    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    My update: I find I can now play without pain so I think the acute problem with my r thumb is over.
    A rule of thumb (pun intended) is: "If it hurts, ease off." Good to hear you playing.

  23. #122

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    Quote Originally Posted by lvdz View Post
    I've recorded Cstroll as well, hope I did it justice. Nice contribution strumcat:

    Cstroll

    However I couldn't manage to record Garage Band's metronome (set at 80 bpm). Rhythm mistakes are detectable anyway.
    Sounds very clean and smooth to me, lvdz. I think the playing is actually better than the tune. And thanks.

  24. #123

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    I think everyone's playing is going well. It takes time to sound good. Especially with something like this. It's like learning to ride a bicycle. It's more important to enjoy the ride and make sure it's fun. I believe everyone here is doing that.

    So, I had to try to write something. It's been a long time. I grabbed Muse Score. And had a go at it.

    It's only 10 bars and I had to use a tie and a dotted half note in the final measure. OK, I guess I didn't 'have to' but I did.
    Jazz washes away the dust of every day life.
    — Art Blakey

    IRL - Folks call me Jerry or Jer-Bear or some other mix of Bear and Jerry.

  25. #124

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    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock! View Post
    this didn't turn out as well as i wanted it to...
    http://db.tt/R42LLzC9
    Aside from the little timing errors, it sounds quite pretty and is very listenable. I think timing and consistency will improve with practice (for both of us). Good work, HIAR.

  26. #125

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    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat View Post
    Aside from the little timing errors, it sounds quite pretty and is very listenable. I think timing and consistency will improve with practice (for both of us). Good work, HIAR.
    I would like to second that. I think it sounds great. I remember when I started guitar and was playing some single line piece in a Hal Leonard Book and thinking how awesome it was to play guitar. In reality, I had no metronome and no sense of rhythm. And I sounded horrible. I remember how it sounded.

    You sounded great, Rock.

    And StrumCat (love the name) your stuff sounds really good too. I thought you were supposed to make everyone look good.
    Jazz washes away the dust of every day life.
    — Art Blakey

    IRL - Folks call me Jerry or Jer-Bear or some other mix of Bear and Jerry.

  27. #126

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    Quote Originally Posted by PirateNigel View Post
    You sounded great, Rock.

    And StrumCat (love the name) your stuff sounds really good too. I thought you were supposed to make everyone look good.
    Ha ha, you haven't heard the outtakes! I downloaded your tune and will try to play through it after I run some errands. (A couple of weeks ago I wouldn't have been able to even attempt it. ) It's great that everyone's contributing. I feel like we've just crested the first foothill and have the whole mountain ahead of us. It's just amazing that we have guys like fep and ronjazz and others here as guides.

  28. #127

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    thanks, guys.

    when i recorded to the click, each part sounded in-time on their own. but when combined, you can really hear the little things that make them not in-time. i expect this to become a larger problem as the pieces become more difficult.
    "Love the game, and the game will love you back" - Andre Dawson

  29. #128

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    I've been working on the arpeggios that are presented from the chords and memorizing the scale and it's relationships.

    W-W-H-W-W-W-H C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

    More Specifically I am trying to memorize what the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, and 13th of the scale is. c-e-g-b-d-f-a In that order. I think this kind of study for myself will pay off in the long run. We don't change into another key until pg 27 where we go to G Major. So, I should have it down pretty good by then.
    Jazz washes away the dust of every day life.
    — Art Blakey

    IRL - Folks call me Jerry or Jer-Bear or some other mix of Bear and Jerry.

  30. #129

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    Hello all,
    I'm Antonio from Milan and this is my second post... I'd be glad to be accepted in the group.
    The volume 1 is travelling home (ordered yesterday): can I try if I'm not still able to read music?
    Thank you all,
    Antonio

  31. #130

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    Quote Originally Posted by Help!I'maRock! View Post
    thanks, guys.

    when i recorded to the click, each part sounded in-time on their own. but when combined, you can really hear the little things that make them not in-time. i expect this to become a larger problem as the pieces become more difficult.
    Do you want to share a recording so we can hear what you mean?

    Sometimes rhythm isn't perfect - and playing to the click exposes every little imperfection - but if you stick at it, it just gets better gradually. I've seen this happen. The coordination and control gets better (over time) and also the sense of 1, 2, 3, 4 gets better (again, over time).

    On the other hand, if you are skipping whole beats (like adding a 5th beat at the end of a bar while you think about the next note - lots of folks do this, or racing through a 4 beat note without giving it it's full value), then that's worth noticing and really working on.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  32. #131

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    Quote Originally Posted by PirateNigel View Post
    I think everyone's playing is going well. It takes time to sound good. Especially with something like this. It's like learning to ride a bicycle. It's more important to enjoy the ride and make sure it's fun. I believe everyone here is doing that.

    So, I had to try to write something. It's been a long time. I grabbed Muse Score. And had a go at it.

    It's only 10 bars and I had to use a tie and a dotted half note in the final measure. OK, I guess I didn't 'have to' but I did.
    Good going Nigel!
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by antonioc67 View Post
    Hello all,
    I'm Antonio from Milan and this is my second post... I'd be glad to be accepted in the group.
    The volume 1 is travelling home (ordered yesterday): can I try if I'm not still able to read music?
    Thank you all,
    Antonio
    Welcome Antonio! I hope your book arrives soon. It will all be clearer when you have the book. The book is all about learning to read music.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  34. #133

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    Great job all, this thread is cruising on auto pilot with all the participation.

    I don't think any of us can be expected to respond to every post (including me) but it looks to me that every post is getting a good response.

    I do want every post to have a response though, it's hard to keep track. If your post didn't get a response then it must have just got lost in the shuffle. Let us know and I'm sure some of us will respond.

    Quote Originally Posted by peejay View Post
    First let me say thanks to everyone participating in this and for the great contributions so far, especially to FEP for getting it up and running.
    I got this idea from reading TTL's post regarding the Leavitt book and then her recording. So let's tip our hat's to TTL

    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat View Post
    My humble music offering...
    Nice job, I like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by lvdz View Post
    I've recorded Cstroll as well, hope I did it justice. Nice contribution strumcat:

    Cstroll

    However I couldn't manage to record Garage Band's metronome (set at 80 bpm). Rhythm mistakes are detectable anyway.
    Sounds real good, and the timing sounds solid.

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    wow, I can see everyone's been busy. My contribution for today is fep's ho ho ho duet. I recorded the first part, then recorded the second part on top (probably not the best way to do it...)

    ho down duet.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Nice going, fep, it's all good practice.
    Thanks for recording that TTL. My tune being played by someone else

  36. #135

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    Greetings!

    I found this thread on Monday and was motivated to join in. Thank you to everyone that has contributed!

    Years ago I made it part way thru MM Vol. 1 but gave up for some reason. I think it was lack of discipline and sheer boredom. Hoping this thread solves both of those problems.

    I'd describe myself as an intermediate reader, been thru Hal Leonard books 1 & 2 with students more times than I can count, and I need to get better at sight reading and position playing.

    Marty

  37. #136

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    Just some words of encouragement. The versions of C-Stroll were all extremely acceptable and even enjoyable to listen to. Kudos to the composition and playing. Well done all (I think Rock, TLT and Lvdz).

    Rock - when I was successfully doing computer-based multi-track recording a few years ago, I found that I had to use the metronome or a drum track for the first guitar part. Then, my software allowed me to play back the first part so I could hear it, also hear the click (although it wasn't recorded), AND then record the second part as a separate audio file. In this way, the two parts were as much in time as I was capable of, but there was no lack of synchronisation between the parts. Sorry of that all sounds a bit unclear, but it's just to suggest that maybe there might be an alternative way for you to record.

    Pirate - just downloaded C-Practice and it looks good. I'm going to try it out just as soon as I get the guitar in my hand.

  38. #137

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    Pirate - that ending's tricky! enjoyable to play though :-)

  39. #138

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    Welcome Marty - looking forward to your participation. I'm certain you'll add something as well :-)

  40. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post
    Frank - thanks for the link - I downloaded Muse and got the hang of it very quickly. So here's my tune "C-Saw". I'd forgotten how long it takes to compose music! However, I should say that I did not follow any specific structure, but just played with chords and a few variations. Some of the chords may look complicated at first, but they are an excellent way to work on some of the sight-reading skills, even if it requires slowing down a little before carrying on.

    I still cannot get my sound interface to function, so I can't get audio up yet but I will record this as soon as I'm able. In the meantime, if it would help Muse does allow me to create a midi file - but that feels like cheating.
    I took a shot at Tony's C-Saw


  41. #140

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Great job all, this thread is cruising on auto pilot with all the participation.


    I got this idea from reading TTL's post regarding the Leavitt book and then her recording. So let's tip our hat's to TTL
    .

    Thanks to TTL ( TLT ?) then as well ! By the way, the link to TLT's pdf file in post #55 doesn't appear to be working any more - file removed. Any chance of a repost please ? Many thanks to all, peejay.

  42. #141

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight View Post
    Just some words of encouragement. The versions of C-Stroll were all extremely acceptable and even enjoyable to listen to. Kudos to the composition and playing. Well done all (I think Rock, TLT and Lvdz).

    Rock - when I was successfully doing computer-based multi-track recording a few years ago, I found that I had to use the metronome or a drum track for the first guitar part. Then, my software allowed me to play back the first part so I could hear it, also hear the click (although it wasn't recorded), AND then record the second part as a separate audio file. In this way, the two parts were as much in time as I was capable of, but there was no lack of synchronisation between the parts. Sorry of that all sounds a bit unclear, but it's just to suggest that maybe there might be an alternative way for you to record.

    Pirate - just downloaded C-Practice and it looks good. I'm going to try it out just as soon as I get the guitar in my hand.
    for whatever reason, Garageband just isn't having it. the metronome doesn't print to the track. i could start a drum track, but that comes with its own issues as we tend to flex time more to drums than to a metronome.
    "Love the game, and the game will love you back" - Andre Dawson

  43. #142

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    Wow, Frank - that made my day! You did a great interpretation of the tune - timing and tonality were both excellent.

    I can't wait to try it myself: I'm playing each part of course, but without the backing part and I'm certainly not capable of playing both parts at once :-)

  44. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by peejay View Post
    Thanks to TTL ( TLT ?) then as well ! By the way, the link to TLT's pdf file in post #55 doesn't appear to be working any more - file removed. Any chance of a repost please ? Many thanks to all, peejay.
    sorry do you mean this one?

    easy guitar duet.PDF - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    I changed a note, so i removed the old file.

    I wrote another today, will try to get it up on boxnet.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  45. #144

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    I think this sound brilliant! And if I may add a little theory without getting too deep. All we have learned so far is the notes of the major scale. And if you put the notes of a major scale together, they sound good. Sometimes harmonious, sometime crunchy, sometimes juicy, but really, fairly much always good. And - you don't need a PhD in composition to do this.

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    I took a shot at Tony's C-Saw

    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  46. #145

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    OK, so I wrote a little blues progression earlier and recorded and mixed it just now.

    sheet:
    I got D blues.PDF - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    separate parts:
    Got D Blues pt 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    got D blues pt 2.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    and full mix:
    I got D blues.PDF - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    It is a blues progression, however without swing quavers and without the blue note, it comes across more as modal. Listening to it mixed for the first time, I get images of a dank medieval castle with no central heating, and an angry king about to execute his lute-player...

    I am pleased with the title, though.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  47. #146

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    I took a shot at Tony's C-Saw

    Please add my kudos to TLT's. Your rhythm is accurately in the groove and the picking is clean. It really inspires me - and I doubt I'm the only one!


    HighSpeed
    Find your passion and be hardcore about it.
    (Hey, if you like the avatar, check out the art work of John Howe)

  48. #147

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    I played chords in a rock band 45 yrs ago (everything then was 3 chords) - and haven't played since then. Never learned notes on fretboard. Now I've picked it up again and want to learn starting from 0. Ordered the book (used on Amazon for $9 - and to my surprise it came with CD) I've been following the thread and really excited about starting this quest; however, I have to leave town for about a week and a half and won't be able to start until I get back. Hope to be able to catch up with you all then. I did notice on CD that exercises were played at a very up tempo. Is one to strive for this quicker tempo or just let the speed come naturally as progression through the book occurs? I'll be monitoring the thread while on the road and hope to get more involved once I catch up.

  49. #148

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    Something I like to do for extra practice is to play the exercises backwards. Start at the last measure and read from right to left until you get to measure one. Weird but mathematically it works.

    Don't remember where I heard about this trick. They suggested doing it to find out if you're reading the notes or playing too much from memory.

    Marty

  50. #149

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    ... I did notice on CD that exercises were played at a very up tempo. Is one to strive for this quicker tempo or just let the speed come naturally as progression through the book occurs? I'll be monitoring the thread while on the road and hope to get more involved once I catch up.
    Welcome oldhead! I'm an old head too.

    Play the exercises slowly enough so that you can play them "reasonably cleanly". Otherwise you will develop sloppy habits. OTOH, the exercises don't have to be perfect either. But speed will come over the long-term.
    Find your passion and be hardcore about it.
    (Hey, if you like the avatar, check out the art work of John Howe)

  51. #150

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    On this point I think it's worth quoting from the introduction to Mr. Leavitt's book:

    This book has been specifically designed to accomplish two things...
    #1. To teach the student to READ music.

    #2. For the gradual development of dexterity in BOTH hands.
    This is the physical part of learning to play the guitar and as
    such cannot be rushed. Practice all material slowly enough
    to maintain an even tempo
    . Do not skip or "slight" anything,
    and also do not attempt to "completely perfect" any one lesson
    before going on. Playing technique is an accumulative process
    and you will find each time you review material already studied
    it will seem easier to play. (Slow, steady practice and constant
    review will eventually lead to speed and accuracy.)

    I refer back to this often!