The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
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  1. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Garrett
    This is bloody refreshing.
    Just like a cold beer on a hot summer evening, as the bbq fires a big chunk of cow and the kids pop a water plug as the sun drifts to the horizon

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  3. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktah B
    Just like a cold beer on a hot summer evening, as the bbq fires a big chunk of cow and the kids pop a water plug as the sun drifts to the horizon
    The perks of colonialism amirite?

  4. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktah B
    It is rather mad and very different going pro, less about astronomy and looking at stars, rather more about crunching numbers on computers.
    I did get a little involved with the Nancy Grace Roman for a very minute amount of time then realised very quickly it was way over my head and not the sort of thing I might excel at. It was never really my thing, moreso doing it because the beloved grandson was into it.
    Still, from the data I received, it's gonna blow hubble and JW into the stone age (no disrespect to either, it is just so massively more advanced).
    I love the deep void images, so very......enlightening?
    yay..... jazzy stuff is cool too!
    well I’m glad I did the degree. It was hard work but mostly fun (and a useful STEM qualification.) I would recommend it. Postgrad is a different thing.

  5. #79

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Garrett
    The perks of colonialism amirite?
    I guess it could well be if that is the kind of party one wishes to attend, I was considering a more inclusive one, maybe a bean burger or two for those with an aversion to eating cow, some ice cold pop for the drivers and a mix of music to cater for all tastes. You could jam too if you care to join in, open house on the instruments and the tunes you wish to play at my party. Just remember to play nice, the party is for everyone to enjoy.

  6. #80

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller


    well I’m glad I did the degree. It was hard work but mostly fun (and a useful STEM qualification.) I would recommend it. Postgrad is a different thing.
    I wish I had been intelligent enough to do something like that, I reckon it would be a right blast. Cutting edge of technological advancement, pushing the parameters of exploration (and I may well have understood the language these people use. I understood the words, just not in in the manner they were put together as sentences). sounds so very exciting to me.

  7. #81

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    [QUOTE=Christian Miller;1202259]A phd in astronomy is 4 years of trying to work out why your computer program isn’t working (I did a masters year working on Hubble data so I got an idea of what it might be like)./QUOTE]

    If computers were a thing when I studied the subject, I would probably have done much better at it. These days I spend my days writing code to simulate light transport through participating media that I think might be like the differential equation that tried to teach me to describe energy emerging from the sun.

  8. #82

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    Quote Originally Posted by Christian Miller


    well I’m glad I did the degree. It was hard work but mostly fun (and a useful STEM qualification.) I would recommend it. Postgrad is a different thing.
    I had a bundle of stuff from Caltech sent to me over the weekend about the simulations being run on the NGR.
    If you're interested there's some info here that might interest you.
    Roman Space Telescope Simulations by the IPAC/STScI/Goddard Group

  9. #83

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    Sweden is a powerhouse for pop music songwriting and production. They have a formula and with that formula they've ruled the pop charts for many years now.There's an interesting book about it called The Song Machine.

    So it makes sense to me that Spotify, a Swedish company, would use the assembly line process for the many niche markets of background music. After all, Spotify is nothing but a capitalist juggernaut that treats musical artists with utter disrespect. They are just the latest in a long line of unscrupulous music companies.

    Personally I think that the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope is leagues more interesting.... I learned a new word today: grism.

  10. #84

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    I still have no idea what a low pass filter does, apparently it has them....or one... maybe a thousand, no matter how many I don't know what it does other than filter something, my guess is some form of light given its purpose, but whether it's low because it doesn't cycle often (as in low amount of passes) or it's referring to frequency, I have no clue. my guess is the latter, I felt way too dumb to ask. My comments were generally "that sounds impressive", as it did, and no matter what I was right, it does sound impressive.

  11. #85

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    Low pass = dumb way of saying high cut.

  12. #86

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy Smith
    Low pass = dumb way of saying high cut.
    Thank you, I'm not so dumb now, what does it do?

  13. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktah B
    Thank you, I'm not so dumb now, what does it do?
    where do they talk about the low pass filter? I looked but couldn't find anything.

    Basically, I enjoy the sensation of reading about the technical aspects as if I understand what's going on, but I really just like to gawk at the pretty pictures.

  14. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by supersoul
    where do they talk about the low pass filter? I looked but couldn't find anything.

    Basically, I enjoy the sensation of reading about the technical aspects as if I understand what's going on, but I really just like to gawk at the pretty pictures.
    I had to go search some pdf stuff because I was worried I may have made it up in my confused state.
    No I didn't, here's a snip

    "Integration is a low-pass filter, and chopping, which is temporal differentiation, is a high-pass filter. Their combined application can produce a limited band filter tominimize the impact of disturbances"

    It sounds fancy pants to me.
    something to do with coronagraphs and searching for exoplanets I think.
    none the less I still have no clue what it does. maybe i don't need to know?
    I liked the hubble pic taken when it was pointing into a really small dark point in space and they found it wasn't dark at all.
    I don't enjoy listening to things I cannot comprehend, advanced scientific mathematics makes me want to cry...
    I'm the sort of numpty that looks at a complex molecule model structure and says "wow, it looks like a pretty flower".... for some of us there is little hope of salvation.

  15. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doktah B
    I had to go search some pdf stuff because I was worried I may have made it up in my confused state.
    No I didn't, here's a snip

    "Integration is a low-pass filter, and chopping, which is temporal differentiation, is a high-pass filter. Their combined application can produce a limited band filter tominimize the impact of disturbances"

    It sounds fancy pants to me.
    something to do with coronagraphs and searching for exoplanets I think.
    Yeah, don't know really... I suspect it's something to do with the fact that with the transit method for finding exoplanets - where the planet goes in front of the star from our point of view - the amount of dimming of the star that planet produces is so absurdly tiny that they need clever stats to work out if there's anything at all (which means lots of clever computer stuff, see above)

    Anyway, I can recommend the YouTube channel 'Cool Worlds' which is presented by an actual exoplanet researcher who also has a gift for communication if you are interested in finding out more without so much gobbledegook.


  16. #90

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    Quote Originally Posted by AllanAllen View Post
    This isn't a new idea. 1979.


    How close to that is the Ghostbusters theme*! (Excluding the bridge, obviously). Just realized. *Edit: the other way round b/c Ghostbusters was a few years later. How am I supoosed to remember this stuff?

    Regarding the noble science of astrophotography, I was reminded of how excited the community was getting a couple of years ago after images of the dimming of light emitted by Betelgeuse suggested we (or our grandchildren) were "about to" (in cosmic terms) witness a supernova. Turned out that it was most likely due to clouds of cosmic (ok, circumstellar) dust. Anyway, keep looking for exoplanets, we'll find a way to get there.