1. #1

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    Could such ideas also apply to the guitar?


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    A lot of Guitarists like to have several instruments, amps, pedals, and a wide palette of sounds. But yes, many guitarists have a signature sound, which has to do with touch I think.

  4. #3

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    Fun vid, thanks for posting!
    Except for some bass-specific ideas (like locking the thumb), most of this makes sense for guitar.

  5. #4

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    Totally makes sense. Lack of tension. Economy of motion. What's not to like? And a recipe for a long trouble-free life of playing.

  6. #5

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    I like the "practice without an amp" part. It helps refine the touch. I practice with an amp as well (before 10 PM ). Everything is in the mundane details.

  7. #6

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    There's obviously a lot that plays into a guitar player's sound, but just taking some time each day to play a few notes and just focusing on the sound you make with your hands is pretty important.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Could such ideas also apply to the guitar?

    Just saw this, K,
    It applies to every instrument regardless of genre. Most guitarists have a generic sound. It's partially due to faulty technique, lack of live performances as a building block, and lack of courage and creativity in their playing. . . "Geez, Bob . . . he sounds just like . . ." Serious musicians search for a lifetime and few find their voice. However, how many baseball players hit .350 or pitchers throw 100 mph?
    McBride is what I call a savant and played professionally in his teens. He was headed to Julliard and quickly hit the road with Bobby Watson and the rest is history. Any musician worth his/her peanuts searches for a voice. The Muses are very selective in their choices.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  9. #8

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    wow...
    Bobby Watson...look at this: