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  1. #1

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Seems simple to me. Not loud enough.

  4. #3

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    And then there is this:

    Sammy Hagar Net Worth | Celebrity Net Worth

    But if you really want to be wealthy you should do this (and don't give any of it to your kids):

    Andrew Lloyd Webber Net Worth | Celebrity Net Worth

  5. #4

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    Answer: You should have gone into InfoTech or Finance or Pharmaceuticals.

    To make gazillions, enjoy guitar and remain anonymous in public...that is the good life.

  6. #5

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    "DAMN, WHAT ARE WE DOING WRONG?"

    If you just wanted to make money, the choice of occupation
    that produced the most millionaires in the USA has been the
    dry cleaning business. This has held the lead for a long time.
    Remember the dry cleaner George Jefferson? Moving on up?
    The show's writers sure did their homework and got it right.
    Yet, how many decided up front on a career in dry cleaning?

  7. #6

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    Our daughter took us to see Huey Lewis and the News when they played at the Chautauqua Institute one fine summer evening. One of the finest concerts I've ever attended. The band was well-rehearsed and was cookin'; Huey was in good voice and top form, the material was first rate. As a family, we've always been fans. Huey and company's hard work, dedication to craft, and sheer musical talent consistently produced some of the finest popular music ever recorded. I have read some snark concerning this sort of thing, and I just don't get it. What's so bad about good, clean fun?

  8. #7

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    I recently saw Huey in an episode of "The Blacklist". I thought he had some good lines.

    I think the answer to the OP's question (though I wouldn't use the term "wrong") is that we don't entertain many people, plain and simple.

    If you don't care about entertaining many people, then making very little if any money is what you should expect from playing music. (What would people be paying you FOR, if not to be entertained?)

    Mick Jagger Net Worth | Celebrity Net Worth

  9. #8

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    As Patrick Bateman noted, "Their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercially and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to Elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a far more bitter, cynical sense of humour."

  10. #9

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    Yup. Pharmaceutical IT consulting.
    worked for me$)

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    As Patrick Bateman noted, "Their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercially and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to Elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a far more bitter, cynical sense of humour."
    It's funny that the band Huey Lewis was in at the time, Clover, was hired by Nick Lowe to back Costello on "Alison." But since a harmonica player wasn't needed, Huey didn't play on the session. (The band's singer at the time was Alex Call, and he wasn't booked either, as Costello did the singing.) Costello didn't yet have his own backing band.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    As Patrick Bateman noted, "Their early work was a little too new wave for my tastes, but when Sports came out in '83, I think they really came into their own, commercially and artistically. The whole album has a clear, crisp sound, and a new sheen of consummate professionalism that really gives the songs a big boost. He's been compared to Elvis Costello, but I think Huey has a far more bitter, cynical sense of humour."
    Ever notice Patrick Bateman and Gavin Newsom are never in the same room at the same time?

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    It's funny that the band Huey Lewis was in at the time, Clover, was hired by Nick Lowe to back Costello on "Alison." But since a harmonica player wasn't needed, Huey didn't play on the session. (The band's singer at the time was Alex Call, and he wasn't booked either, as Costello did the singing.) Costello didn't yet have his own backing band.
    What happened to his band, The Attractions? Why didn't they do it? I guess this was after he went solo?

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter
    Yup. Pharmaceutical IT consulting.
    worked for me$)
    I'm too lazy for that. I should have been born into money. That's the way to go.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    What happened to his band, The Attractions? Why didn't they do it? I guess this was after he went solo?
    This was before he had a band. He was a solo artist, who sent a demo to Stiff Records. They recruited Clover, an American band resident in London, to make a demo that was intended to persuade Dave Edmunds to record Costello's songs. When that did not work and a plan for Costello to share a début album with Wreckless Eric also came to nothing, Stiff agreed to Costello recording an album, with Clover as his backing group. The result was My Aim is True, released in July 1977.


  16. #15

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    Just for jollies I googled richest jazz performers. And found that Herb Alpert is the 4th richest of any kind of musician, right after McCartney, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Jay-Z. $850 million smackers.

    A youtube video list has the top 10 net worth jazzers as Brubeck (lowest at $14m), Wynton Marsalis, Nat King Cole, Count Basie ($46m), Kenny G ($100m), Tony Bennett ($200m), Sinatra ($250m), Quincy Jones ($400m), Bing Crosby ($550m), then Herb Alpert.

  17. #16

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    Kind of Blue is the best-selling jazz album in history. The second best-selling jazz album is theVince Guaraldi Trio's A Charlie Brown Christmas, certified four-times platinum by the RIAA in 2016.

    Context is king.
    Last edited by Litterick; 07-26-2021 at 07:52 PM.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    What happened to his band, The Attractions? Why didn't they do it? I guess this was after he went solo?
    Quite the opposite: "Alison" was recorded before The Attractions formed. I don't even think he was called Elvis Costello at the time "Alison" was recorded, but he was certainly called that when his debut album ("My Aim Is True") came out. That's the album with "Alison" on it.

  19. #18

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    I think accounting would have been the way to go in the early 80's. One of my classmates made a ton of money in investing and retired in his early 40's, to run a charitable foundation.

    Or software. Another classmate ran the voice rec program for Microsoft, retired about age 40, and donated a million $$ to my high school.

    But I guess neither of them ever got divorced, which is why some of us have to keep working...

    I would see Huey Lewis outside in a park--would be a good show I think.

    As far as Elvis, whom I last saw about 1982, he will be playing a FREE concert at a park in Omaha at the end of August--the delayed 4th of July concert. (I think the idea of delaying the concert because of COVID was unfortunate, as the COVID rate will be much higher in August than it was in early July.) Looking forward to it, and hope COVID doesn't f*** it up.

  20. #19

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    Envy is an ugly thing- it makes people bitter about their lot in life.

    Being a jazz musician has long been a terrible way to make even a middle class living.

    Now there's a whole new generation of arrogant little pricks who think they're elite guitar players and are mad about hundred dollar restaurant gigs. I actually just saw a FB thread disparaging Eric Clapton and comparing him to a "weekend warrior". The guys who were bashing him don't have decades of history making bands and recordings, and couldn't fill up a night club, let alone Madison Square Garden.

    anyway, most of the wealth star performers (and athletes) have didn't come from them actually performing, it came from investing, sponsorships, and business deals. Herb Alpert sure didn't make his money as a trumpet player- it was from A&M records!

  21. #20

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    TBF, Herb did double on flugelhorn.

  22. #21

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    Not for one moment have I regretted not going into accounting in the eighties.

  23. #22

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    An accountant is an actuarial with no sense of humor. Had one call me out for having my sleeves rolled up - just the cuffs.

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    This was before he had a band. He was a solo artist, who sent a demo to Stiff Records. They recruited Clover, an American band resident in London, to make a demo that was intended to persuade Dave Edmunds to record Costello's songs. When that did not work and a plan for Costello to share a début album with Wreckless Eric also came to nothing, Stiff agreed to Costello recording an album, with Clover as his backing group. The result was My Aim is True, released in July 1977.

    The only future member of The Attractions on MAIT was Steve (Nason) Nieve, who played keyboards on one track, Watching the Detectives.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by JGinNJ
    Envy is an ugly thing- it makes people bitter about their lot in life.

    Being a jazz musician has long been a terrible way to make even a middle class living.

    Now there's a whole new generation of arrogant little pricks who think they're elite guitar players and are mad about hundred dollar restaurant gigs. I actually just saw a FB thread disparaging Eric Clapton and comparing him to a "weekend warrior". The guys who were bashing him don't have decades of history making bands and recordings, and couldn't fill up a night club, let alone Madison Square Garden.

    anyway, most of the wealth star performers (and athletes) have didn't come from them actually performing, it came from investing, sponsorships, and business deals. Herb Alpert sure didn't make his money as a trumpet player- it was from A&M records!
    I saw this at an estate sale yesterday—early edition with all the usual wear on the cover:



    I didn’t buy it. I did buy a barrister’s bookcase in excellent condition—about 100 years old. Makes me feel young.

    I’m sure Herb did make a ton of money selling records in addition to producing them, and invested well.

    Most of the very successful musicians are excellent entertainers who spent countless hours honing their craft and were savvy and lucky enough to get the business parts right so they actually made some money.

    BTW as you know Jimmy Buffett is one of the wealthiest musicians out there. He made a ton of money in merchandise and real estate. He also invested in—not kidding—tour buses, when he saw that big expensive tour buses were becoming de rigeur for traveling acts. He bought a bunch and leased them. Good chance if you saw Whitesnake a decade ago they were traveling in a tour bus owned by JB.

  26. #25

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    I bought that album back in the mid-late 60s, I think, and it's probably still in the big shelf of vinyl that I haven't looked through in years. I honestly don't know why I keep all those LPs, they just take up space that could be better used by something else. But I'm lazy, and I hate to throw stuff away. Same for all the books I have.