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  1. #26
    As far as teaching students pop songs that I myself dont really know I would teach them how to do this for themselves. First I would tell them they need to find the root of each chord on the sixth string if they want. Then try and determine the quality of the chord is it maj.minor,dom7. Aug and Dim if in the song. Then if fitting the color tones or tensions to the chords. If I can accomplish teaching them these skills I think they have a lifetime skill set to learn any basic pop song fairly easily. If they wish to write the information down then thats another skill that will come in handy most likely. So Im talking very basic. Keep it simple. I like to start with the 4 basic triads before teaching chord or with them. I try to split my lessons with newcomers to be about half fun quickly useful things and more difficult things that take more practice so they can improve each lesson hopefully.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Hi, D,
    There's only one way to achieve your goal: study the guitar like a legitimate instrument and find a good Classical Guitar teacher. After that, your skills/knowledge will allow you to pursue any genre with competence. Otherwise, you'll waste valuable time and money. There's no instrument that has been played or abused as much as the guitar.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  4. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, D,
    There's only one way to achieve your goal: study the guitar like a legitimate instrument and find a good Classical Guitar teacher. After that, your skills/knowledge will allow you to pursue any genre with competence. Otherwise, you'll waste valuable time and money. There's no instrument that has been played or abused as much as the guitar.
    Play live . . . Marinero
    Absurd on its face, or you've mixed up your forum memberships which can happen to anyone ?

  5. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulW10
    Absurd on its face, or you've mixed up your forum memberships which can happen to anyone ?
    Hi, P,
    Perhaps to you, but not if you want to move quickly to your goal. Most students waste untold time and money with well-intentioned, non-formally trained guitar "teachers" who are either incapable of teaching the rudiments of music and good technique needed for speedy progress or waste time teaching the student what song he wants to learn to be the next superstar--you can't teach what you don't know. Every other serious modern musician on the planet TODAY who plays Jazz: piano, sax, trumpet, string bass, etc. begins with a progressive Classical education as a foundation for their musical journey. So, it's up to you. Why not do it right the first time around? Ask me . . . I know from experience. Play live . . . Marinero

    Did you know that Louis Armstrong was an ear musician when he first began playing and performing? Did you also know he went back to learn reading music and the fundamentals of music after he became successful since it was a detriment to his further success? Louis died 50 years ago. I wonder what he knew?????? M

  6. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, P,
    Perhaps to you, but not if you want to move quickly to your goal. Most students waste untold time and money with well-intentioned, non-formally trained guitar "teachers" who are either incapable of teaching the rudiments of music and good technique needed for speedy progress or waste time teaching the student what song he wants to learn to be the next superstar--you can't teach what you don't know. Every other serious modern musician on the planet TODAY who plays Jazz: piano, sax, trumpet, string bass, etc. begins with a progressive Classical education as a foundation for their musical journey. So, it's up to you. Why not do it right the first time around? Ask me . . . I know from experience. Play live . . . Marinero

    Did you know that Louis Armstrong was an ear musician when he first began playing and performing? Did you also know he went back to learn reading music and the fundamentals of music after he became successful since it was a detriment to his further success? Louis died 50 years ago. I wonder what he knew?????? M
    Hi M,

    I guess I'm unsure what you mean by a "Classical" education. Surely studying the classical guitar is one way to learn the rudiments. Where I take exception is you seem to imply it's the only way. The world is full of examples to show that studying classical guitar is not the only way to obtain a thorough musical education, or at least obtain sufficient knowledge in order to excel.

    Also, you have to consider what the goals of the student are. If you have an adult simply wanting to learn how to strum chords to accompany his exquistive singing voice, then he wouldn't be interested in working towards playing Lagrima! He'd probably move on in a hurry if the teacher wants to cram something down his throat he's not interested in learning. Of course, if a person is interested in studying classical guitar, than obviously the teacher needs an appropriate background.

    Also, the market will dictate good versus bad teachers. Some people are very good at explaining how to do things and have the ability to make it very interesting for people to learn, especially beginners. They don't need to be Segovia to be successful in that regard. These teachers will keep a busy roster. On the other hand, being an exceptional classical guitarist does not mean you'd have those same types of teaching skills, or patience with the mere mortals, needed to be a successful teacher.

    Paul

  7. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Woody Sound
    This is precisely why I don't teach anymore. At one point I probably had close to 20/wk. While I enjoyed the friendly time with the students, I liked to focus on what you mentioned above. Learning the instrument, understanding what you're doing, etc. While some serious students were very interested in that, most just wanted to "play that song by Journey," etc. Not only was I not into that (and it took too much time of my own), after years I started thinking I am a bad teacher. And I still do. Just the other day another member of my big band asked if I would take on a student, and I just said "I'm really not a good teacher."
    I grew up studying clarinet in the nys public school system from 4th grade on. The teachers were all excellent, I still admire them. Kept it up right though university orchestra and band ensembles. I was taught what to do and *why,*. Learned all about making music instead of "I can play this folk song."

    "Not that there's anything wrong with that."

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by PaulW10
    Hi M,

    I guess I'm unsure what you mean by a "Classical" education. Surely studying the classical guitar is one way to learn the rudiments. Where I take exception is you seem to imply it's the only way. The world is full of examples to show that studying classical guitar is not the only way to obtain a thorough musical education, or at least obtain sufficient knowledge in order to excel.

    Also, you have to consider what the goals of the student are. If you have an adult simply wanting to learn how to strum chords to accompany his exquistive singing voice, then he wouldn't be interested in working towards playing Lagrima! He'd probably move on in a hurry if the teacher wants to cram something down his throat he's not interested in learning. Of course, if a person is interested in studying classical guitar, than obviously the teacher needs an appropriate background.

    Also, the market will dictate good versus bad teachers. Some people are very good at explaining how to do things and have the ability to make it very interesting for people to learn, especially beginners. They don't need to be Segovia to be successful in that regard. These teachers will keep a busy roster. On the other hand, being an exceptional classical guitarist does not mean you'd have those same types of teaching skills, or patience with the mere mortals, needed to be a successful teacher.

    Paul
    Hi, P,
    Today, a serious student can study Jazz guitar with a university trained JG who, in theory, should provide the same foundation as would be provided by a CG teacher. So, that's an option today that didn't exist in the past. And, in regards to a musical foundation, I'm not talking about Johnny Johnson who wants to be the next super shredder or Blues phenom, but a serious person who wants to study formal music and become a complete musician--Jazz or Classical. This cannot be done when you study with a teacher who, himself, is not formally trained or if so, drones on about the Mixolydian mode and the student doesn't know the difference between a half-note and an eighth note. My suggestion to study with a CG, in this case, is not that the student wants to play Lagrima but that he/she wants to study with a teacher who can provide them with a solid foundation to musical study. Simple. The "hey, Man--try this chord down here" approach won't get him where he wants to go. I hope this is clear now.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  9. #33

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    So just my experience for what its worth. People usually wanted to take lessons from me when I was in a popular band. And I found these the harder students to teach.
    They were interested in playing licks and not really learning their instrument or repertoire required to achieve what was needed to achieve their goals.

    Teaching guitar is much like herding cats in many ways. Guitarists especially myself always want everything right away without working for it.
    It took a trombonist to show me correctly how to learn my instrument,LOL !

  10. #34

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    for me..teaching is a separate skill..for any subject..you may know world history inside and out...but to teach it to someone that wants to learn it and has no idea what a map is..that will take alot of dedication and effort to impart that knowledge in a way that makes sense and is interesting and is what the student WANTS to know..

    the first question I ask is..what do YOU want to learn...from there we can work together..if I don't know what the students interest is..I tell them I dont know that style and say good luck.

    these days I don't know what the pop musicial tastes are..and the "Speed Class" wants to be Govan..In two lessons..(hey so do I) so when I find someone who wants to learn more about music than guitar
    I will spend some time with them to develope their abilities.

    I stress that it takes time to get "good" ..I can show you 20 chords..and you can learn them in a couple of weeks...but to know how to use them..that will take years..but..the journey is worth every step.

  11. #35

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    "for me..teaching is a separate skill..for any subject Wolfen

    Hi, W,
    This, of course, is the most important element of this discussion. Great players do not always make great teachers.
    Play live . . . Marinero