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  1. #1

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    I had never seen this before. Easy to acknowledge that he was truly a great lyricist, IMHO.


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  3. #2

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    Being The Beatles fan since I was about 9 or 10 (and it was in the 80s) and Lennon especially - I had both his books...
    and honestly I think he was most gifted of them in general... I admire and love them all..

    But Lennon had a special gift, some natural connection with language and literature tradition...

    McCartney is gifted, inventive, creative but he is all in traditional song-writing schol.

    Lennon has some deeper roots... even his earliest songs are in most cases very personal... his musical choices are often simple but surprisungly unusual... and in his sngs there is strong connection between music and lyrics...

    you cannot always say where the things he does come from and how...

  4. #3

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    He's merely a footnote to the genius of Stanley Unwin:



    Who was but a footnote to the great genius of James Joyce:



    I'm kidding. John was great. But he was definitely working within a tradition. I wish the condescending writer had asked him about his inspirations.

  5. #4

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    I've had A Spaniard in the Works for decades. It unquestionably warped my mind. Not quite as much as Finnegan's Wake, to be fair, but I only got 152 pages into FW before throwing up my hands in abject defeat. I did read all of Joyce's other stuff and quite enjoyed it, including Ulysses.
    One of the institutions of higher learning I attended had on its faculty the world's foremost authority on FW. He had taken each page of this tome and glued it to a large piece of poster board and had surrounded said page with hand-written detailed notes on the text - dozens on a single page - for the entire book. "Monumental" just scratches the surface. I don't know if it was ever published; it would have to be gigantic to be remotely legible. An Heroic effort of scholarship if ever there was. Fascinating lecturer. Friend and mentor of a friend and mentor.

  6. #5

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    No reader of serious literature could view the above laughable video as anything other than doggerel written by a famous person. And, further, I challenge any "authority" on the Beetles to provide any lyrics to any of their songs that could stand alone as a serious poem. The Beetle Boys, John and Paul, were ,undoubtedly, talented popular songwriters and were able to touch the hearts and souls of Global youth with their music and lyrics. Their commercial success was extraordinary. However, let's not include John in the same company as Eliot, Auden, Plath, Thomas, and Graves much as we wouldn't include him in the same company as Wes, Joe, Renee, Grant, Freddie, or Joe. . . ave verum corpus.

    Play live . . . Marinero

  7. #6

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    Yes, k, Joyce went too far for me with FW, although I recall that it made sense if you were completely inebriated...well he was inebriated when he wrote it, so that makes sense.

    Marinero, are you saying that only great poets can be regarded as poets? In which case I have no chance...not that I consider myself a poet - far from it - but have beaten out only a dozen or so on my typewriter in 61 years.

    Here, for what it's worth, is my Joyce tribute. The first two stanzas were in meditation on this photo:

    John Lennon poetry interview-joyce_guitar-600x525-jpg

    ...followed by Stephen Dedalus's walk (with trusty ash-plant walking stick) on the beach at Sandymount, thinking of exile. Daedalus was father of Icarus. Joyce = Icarus.

    John Lennon poetry interview-giacomo-jpg

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    No reader of serious literature could view the above laughable video as anything other than doggerel written by a famous person. And, further, I challenge any "authority" on the Beetles to provide any lyrics to any of their songs that could stand alone as a serious poem. The Beetle Boys, John and Paul, were ,undoubtedly, talented popular songwriters and were able to touch the hearts and souls of Global youth with their music and lyrics. Their commercial success was extraordinary. However, let's not include John in the same company as Eliot, Auden, Plath, Thomas, and Graves much as we wouldn't include him in the same company as Wes, Joe, Renee, Grant, Freddie, or Joe. . . ave verum corpus.

    Play live . . . Marinero
    Can the My Pillow Guy help you out at all?

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    No reader of serious literature could view the above laughable video as anything other than doggerel written by a famous person. And, further, I challenge any "authority" on the Beetles to provide any lyrics to any of their songs that could stand alone as a serious poem. The Beetle Boys, John and Paul, were ,undoubtedly, talented popular songwriters and were able to touch the hearts and souls of Global youth with their music and lyrics. Their commercial success was extraordinary. However, let's not include John in the same company as Eliot, Auden, Plath, Thomas, and Graves much as we wouldn't include him in the same company as Wes, Joe, Renee, Grant, Freddie, or Joe. . . ave verum corpus.

    Play live . . . Marinero
    I think it is totally wrong in concern of John.

    And it is strange to compare him with those mentioned poets or jazz guitarists because he is neither a poet nor jazz guiatarist.
    (Of course he is not a writer and his writing is rather a representative of his roots than real expression of his talent and he is not guitarist. By the way most of the stuff in his both books were written before he became famous)

    Actually among those jazz guitarists you mention I think only Wes is in the same cathegory if I spoke about artistic talent....

    People often mix great skills, tasty choices with real artistic gift...
    Bird and Wes had it.
    But Grant Greene or Joe Pass - with all my huge admiration - not.
    It is not humiliation, it is just other cathegory... They were talented, inventive, original but it is not that yet.

    John's song-writing just puts him above almost anyone in his generation really... for example Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan are great but they are serious in it... this is what they are after, in some sens they are supposed to be great.

    and John is not.. he does with easiness absolutely astnishing things staying at the same time within the area of music he belogs too and that puts him above it actually.

    It Won't Be Long or I'll Be Back are masterpieces and they are quite equal artistically to greatest works or Plath or best solos of Wes.. (though I do not like that kind of occasional name-dropping)...
    How he arranges form and its relationship with lyrics and how natural it all works. N-one culd do it in that genre or style...

    I compare with him only Cole Porter in his most unordinary work (as he did plenty of music he still made a lot of conventional cliches)

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Yes, k, Joyce went too far for me with FW, although I recall that it made sense if you were completely inebriated...well he was inebriated when he wrote it, so that makes sense.

    Marinero, are you saying that only great poets can be regarded as poets? In which case I have no chance...not that I consider myself a poet - far from it - but have beaten out only a dozen or so on my typewriter in 61 years.

    Here, for what it's worth, is my Joyce tribute. The first two stanzas were in meditation on this photo:

    John Lennon poetry interview-joyce_guitar-600x525-jpg

    ...followed by Stephen Dedalus's walk (with trusty ash-plant walking stick) on the beach at Sandymount, thinking of exile. Daedalus was father of Icarus. Joyce = Icarus.

    John Lennon poetry interview-giacomo-jpg
    I doff my hat to you, Sir! That is excellent! Quality over quantity, always!

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    Can the My Pillow Guy help you out at all?
    Hi, L,
    You've used that line once before in another post and it wasn't funny or clever the first time. Water seeks its own level . . . I think you've found yours.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, L,
    You've used that line once before in another post and it wasn't funny or clever the first time. Water seeks its own level . . . I think you've found yours.
    Play live . . . Marinero
    That’ll be their ‘buy one get one free’ offer.

  13. #12

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    "Marinero, are you saying that only great poets can be regarded as poets? In which case I have no chance...not that I consider myself a poet - far from it - but have beaten out only a dozen or so on my typewriter in 61 years." Rob Mackillop

    Hi, R,
    No. However, there is a difference between serious poetry and doggerel. And, being a published poet has nothing to do with talent. It has everything to do with connections and nepotism as a general rule since p
    ublishing, even academic, is a business. I have always wondered how many talented poets, writers, musicians, and artists have gone to their graves without due recognition over the millennia.
    So . . . who's the judge? You and your exposure to the genre. My favorite poets are Yeats, Frost, Roethke, Takahashi, Stryk, Auden, Trakl, Creeley, Snyder . . . and my favorite poem of all time is "The Love Story of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot. I judge poetry by the standards of these poets and my personal sensibilities of being a serious student of Literature for my entire life.
    In regards to your poetry, Rob . . . all good poems showcase the intellectual and spiritual epiphanies of a poet's life--his weltanschauung and soul, if you will. You're the first judge of how successful your poems reflect those elements. Perhaps, others will enjoy them as well.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  14. #13

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    Thanks for the slight.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Thanks for the slight.
    Hi, R,
    What's the slight? Can you please explain since I can see nothing in my previous post that even remotely says anything critical or mean-spirited about you.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  16. #15

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    You're the first judge of how successful your poems reflect those elements. Perhaps, others will enjoy them as well.” Sorry, I read that negatively, that clearly I “enjoyed” my poems and hoped others would too. I don’t recognise the word enjoy in terms of my own poems, and I’m not at all hoping people like them. If they do, they do, and that’s all well and good, but I’m not seeking anything. Sorry if I am too sensitive here. As no slight was intended, I apologise, and let’s move on.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    You're the first judge of how successful your poems reflect those elements. Perhaps, others will enjoy them as well.” Sorry, I read that negatively, that clearly I “enjoyed” my poems and hoped others would too. I don’t recognise the word enjoy in terms of my own poems, and I’m not at all hoping people like them. If they do, they do, and that’s all well and good, but I’m not seeking anything. Sorry if I am too sensitive here. As no slight was intended, I apologise, and let’s move on.
    So, Rob,
    We who dabble in the Dark Arts are sensitive people. And, again, my post was intended with all due respect to you as a person. So, thanks for your honest reply. I've already turned the page.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    ...Water seeks its own level . . . I think you've found yours.
    I guess that I might have something in common with the My Pillow Guy then. You, of course, float high above us. So high that I can't see you. At least I have a pretty idea of what I can't see.