Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 47 of 47
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    It's funny how throughout my life, I have bought CDs and albums and most of the time, I only really liked 3 or 4 of the songs. This has always kept me from put the artist or musicians too high on a pedestal. Friends would say, "you gotta buy this!" But, after hearing the hit song, and maybe another, I used to find myself wanting a refund.

    Often, the songs that I click with, I really, really like - but the others may leave me cold. Ar you the same way or do you feel every song is at least great, from you favorite artists.

    Admittedly, I often found myself liking more songs when I heard them in live performances.

    Thanks.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    It's funny how throughout my life, I have bought CDs and albums and most of the time, I only really liked 3 or 4 of the songs.
    Thanks.
    Ah, yes the dreaded music industry.
    I've often felt the urge to discuss this topic here.
    How does popularity among the vast unknowing yield our modern jazz household names?

    Never forget humans undeniable affinity towards boredom and laziness.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu


  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    It seems to me that no matter how good the album is, there is typically some filler, or at least some "B" tunes as opposed to "A" tunes, so to speak.

    An album with all "A" tunes is hard to find, especially when it consists of originals.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Not so much for jazz, particularly stuff released on labels like Blue Note that allowed for longer running times on tunes...so you get less songs, but there's better songs, and lots of quality playing. So generally, I'd say on jazz albums I consider great, there's not filler, and there's a lot of those records.

    For other genres like rock, pop, country, hip hop, etc, it is VERY RARE that I like every song. I can think of only a handful of examples, really.

    I wonder if this has to do with the idea that jazz is probably not as much trying to win over new fans, but to appeal to the niche group they already appeal to, whereas rock/pop/etc. need to constantly appeal to new, young, consumers as the top end of their demographic "ages out" of listening to new music and falls into their mid thirties "I still like the music I liked when I was 16 the best" rut?

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    I seem to recall Keith Richards once saying of Motown albums that you got two hits and 8 tracks of shit. (I can't speak to that; as a kid, I only bought Motown singles.)

    As for non-jazz albums where every song is good, I would have to say Pink Floyd's "Dark Side of The Moon." That's certainly an album millions of people have listened to from end to end time and again.

    Led Zeppelin IV is another. Some would say this of Fleetwod Mac's "Rumors." The Beatles' "Sgt. Pepper's" is this sort of album for many.

    I feel this way about the Allman Brothers "Eat A Peach" (-I can't get enough of "Mountain Jam," but I know that most can.)

    It was normal for me as a kid to listen to albums from end to end. It was just what I did. My brothers were like that too. Genesis, Blue Oyster Cult, David Bowie, Roxy Music, Ted Nugent (me, not them), the Stones, Taj Mahal, Led Zeppelin II and IV, the New York Dolls, Todd Rundgren....

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Sometimes. Sometimes not. Every one is individual and different. But if you buy a lot of music, it's inevitable that there will be some songs you don't like as much as others. It's a matter of taste, and everyone's is different.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    My LPs I would play end to end, a habit I got from listening to symphonies, reinforced by the idea that once the needle was in that groove, it stayed there until the arm was automatically lifted and brought to rest where it belonged, and I flipped over the retainer and it was safe until the next use. Once CDs became established I used to skip songs all the time, even with artists I really liked.* Very few collections of music are 100% gems. As Mark noted, there are exceptions, and the era of the concept album was a high-water mark, IMHO. Depending on my mood, I might skip half a disc, especially in the car. Life is too short to listen reluctantly.

    * Why would I buy something I didn't like?**

    ** Back in the day, to learn the latest hits, which were not always to my taste. I ended up with a lot of 45s. Remember them?

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    LP's limited the amount of music to about 45 minutes too, which is a good length for taking in the whole thing.

    CD's got really bloated in the 90's/00's...who has nearly 80 minutes to hang around? And with that, more filler...

    And now essentially we are back to a "singles based" music. The album is dead. Jukeboxes would be huge again, if we didn't already have one in our pocket.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    LP's limited the amount of music to about 45 minutes too, which is a good length for taking in the whole thing.
    The Stones made albums shorter than that. There used to be an argument that you needed 20 minutes or less per side, otherwise the sound quality suffered. (Don't know if that's true, but it's something I read while growing up that stuck in my mind.)

    Here's a list of ten classic albums that clock in at under 30 minutes, including Dylan's "Nashville Skyline", Slayer's "Reign In Blood", CCR's "Green River" and The Ramones' self-titled debut.

    10 Classic Rock Albums That Last Less Than 30 Minutes | Classics Du Jour

    Here's a nifty article about great albums with (exactly) 8 songs on them.
    I don't agree that all these albums are great, though certainly I agree that Television's "Marquee Moon" is.

    Why 8 Songs Is All It Takes to Make a Great Album - InsideHook

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    I liked everything on the Stones' "Sticky Fingers."

    Here is one listener's ranking of the ten (!) songs. (Serves as a reminder of what all the songs are, in case one doesn't have an encyclopedic memory.)


  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    For the record, I also liked everything on "Let It Bleed." (Supposedly the band's response to the Beatles' "Let It Be".)

    Gimme Shelter
    Love In Vain
    Country Honk
    Live With Me
    Let It Bleed
    Midnight Rambler
    You Got The Silver (Keith's first lead vocal?)
    Monkey Man
    You Can't Always Get What You Want

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    One of the great things about listening to digital files is that if there a few tunes on an album that I don't like, I can just choose either to not buy them or to not load them on to my music player.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    Admittedly, I often found myself liking more songs when I heard them in live performances.
    This^^^

    Also to add, when still I had my awesome headphones, I listened through all songs on albums just to feel the bliss that a good sounding instrument or voice makes... the songs didn't have to be even close to brilliant then.

    If the sound ain't that good, the personal taste matters so much more.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    It depends...

    Mark Knopfler, pretty much like them all.

    Steely Dan, hard to find a song on any of their albums I don't like

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    I like all songs on Led Zeppelin 1, 2, 3, 4 and ELP Trilogy, and Pink Floyd Wish You Were Here.
    Regarding jazz, Pat Metheny's Bright Size Life, Scofield's Rough House, Bobby Broom Plays Monk comes to my mind first (I suppose it would be too boring mention Kind of Blue), I am sure there are plenty.

    However you are right, those albums let they count even over hundred are the minority, less tha 10 percent.

    I also noticed a bad habit on myself, that I abuse the easyness what technology gives me to switch and skip tunes, and even surf across album by album. This was impossible with a turntable. Same effect with the value, I mean inflating. For start I had a few LPs so I had to value them, and had to listen every note out, like the hungry man with the last breadcrumbs. Now I have all the jazz, rock and classic records in my hand using apple music, spotify and tidal. (But before the online era I also had the lossless offline version of 3000 jazz and classical albums giving similar experience using Kodi, or other multimedia center application.)

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    It depends...

    Mark Knopfler, pretty much like them all.

    Steely Dan, hard to find a song on any of their albums I don't like
    I never skip songs on Steely Dan records! Even if some didn't thrill me at first, they grew on me. "Aja" had only 7 songs but they are all first rate: Black Cow, Aja, Deacon Blues, Peg, Home At Last, I Got The News, and Josie.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    Yea, with my favorite bands, sure, every song. AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Metallica... just of the top of my head. Cant go wrong with any album any song.

    In jazz, hmm, I think the same. If I like one off the album, I know I will like the rest. Because it's about the sound, the vibe, the energy, much more than how they put the chords and melodies together.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive
    Yea, with my favorite bands, sure, every song. AC/DC, Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Metallica... just of the top of my head. Cant go wrong with any album any song.

    In jazz, hmm, I think the same. If I like one off the album, I know I will like the rest. Because it's about the sound, the vibe, the energy, much more than how they put the chords and melodies together.
    I think AC/DC's "Back In Black" is one of those 'just play the whole damn thing' records. (Others of theirs are too, really, but the sound of that one is STILL fresh and strong.)

    Sabbath's "Paranoid" was one I heard a lot from end to end as a kid. (The first album too and "Sabotage".)
    Metallica's "Master of Puppets" was another one that never seemed to let up.
    My little brother played Patti Smith's "Horses" from end to end, over and over, for months. Same with "Ziggy Stardust."
    Lou Reed's "Rock'n'Roll Animal" with Steve Hunter and Dick Wagner on guitars was good from end to end.


  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    The Stones made albums shorter than that. There used to be an argument that you needed 20 minutes or less per side, otherwise the sound quality suffered. (Don't know if that's true, but it's something I read while growing up that stuck in my mind.)
    I just heard something about that...I believe you have to cut the grooves closer together, and it affects the bass. So to have a really good "bottom end" you can't have too much music crammed onto the side of a record.

    What I kind of miss in today's less AOR world is less interesting intros and little spoken word or musical interludes. I was listening to the ELO song Fire on High today, with that wonderful Beatlesesque opening, which is a rarity these days. Also loved Frank Zappa's naughty little interludes as on Uncle Meat, and the short song segments on REM's Life's Rich Pageants.

    Let's just say for the kind of music I tend to like, I generally like ALL the songs on the album. I find that with some artists I'm not too familiar with, oh let's say Free or Manassas, I only like about 25% of the cuts on first listening. There is a reason so many classic rock groups were so successful, and one of the reasons is they knew how to make good records without much filler. Most of the time.

    BTW nice rockumentary on Peter Gabriel making the So album--Daniel Lanois moved in with him for ONE YEAR to make the darn thing. Peter spend weeks deciding on the song sequence. No wonder his output was so sparse in those days. Maybe even more OCD than Steely Dan, well no one is more OCD than Fagen and Becker.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Come to think of it many artists/groups start out making good records with a bit of filler--the Stones for instance--then hit their stride and make GREAT records with 100% prime music, then lose their touch for awhile and end up with mostly filler and a few good bits.

    Story of my life I guess.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    good till the last drop

    kenny b- midnight blue



    cheers

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Is there any artist at all who has released ONLY universally good bits?

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by emanresu
    Is there any artist at all who has released ONLY universally good bits?
    Chick Corea comes to mind...

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    I just thought of the case- Queen! Fantastic band, live maybe the best ever, and so many hits we all know and love. But albums? The only album I'd ever get is The Greatest Hits

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Having just listened repeatedly to quite a few tunes of theirs in the last couple weeks, I'd say any song by New Grass Revival is as good as any other tune. Top playing, strong song craft, and impeccable taste--no filler. World class.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    The Ramones' self-titled debut.

    Yes ... Clocking in under 30 minutes it still contained 14 tunes. Maybe something others could learn from?

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Chick Corea comes to mind...

    That is up for debate ...


  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    Yes ... Clocking in under 30 minutes it still contained 14 tunes. Maybe something others could learn from?
    A lot of punk songs were short. No guitar solos! No intros either, just 1-2-3-4 BOOM.

    The Minutemen's "Double Nickels on the Dime" (a double album) had 45 songs on it, many under 2 minutes long (a few under a minute). The longest song was under 3 minutes.

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    If we talk about jazz...yes!

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Elvis Costello's album Get Happy has 20 songs, average about 2 minutes. It's a very good album, not too much filler there.

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Lobomov
    That is up for debate ...

    I don't think I have heard that album...now you've got me intrigued!

    Well let's just say he bats over .900...gets a hit most at bats!

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Elvis Costello's album Get Happy has 20 songs, average about 2 minutes. It's a very good album, not too much filler there.
    I played that album a lot. Probably my last favorite Costello album. (Well "Trust", but I didn't listen to it as much.) I used to know every word to every song on that album. (At least, what I thought was every word---when I got the Costello songbook I realized I had misheard some things.)

    This guitar part reminds me of Booker T & the MGs "Time Is Tight."


  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I played that album a lot. Probably my last favorite Costello album. (Well "Trust", but I didn't listen to it as much.) I used to know every word to every song on that album. (At least, what I thought was every word---when I got the Costello songbook I realized I had misheard some things.)

    This guitar part reminds me of Booker T & the MGs "Time Is Tight."

    No guest artists—guess that was Elvis playing the old Jazzmaster. He is an underrated guitarist. He is one of those people who is a keen observer of certain genres and a great mimic. He obviously obsesses about using the guitar sound to create an atmosphere for the songs.

    That was kind of a transitional album—a throwback style-wise—before he moved into bigger concepts and production.

    My all-time favorite Elvis album is Armed Forces—not a dud on that one!—but recently I have been relistening to Trust and appreciating the craftsmanship that went into it. There are some real gems there, and arguably one of the lushest sounds on any of his records.

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    Different shades of blue...

    Do you like every song on an artist's CD or album?-midnight_blue-jpg

    Do you like every song on an artist's CD or album?-almostblue-jpg

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    Often, the songs that I click with, I really, really like - but the others may leave me cold. Are you the same way or do you feel every song is at least great, from you favorite artists.
    I cannot think of any album that is 100% for me. The best are about 90%. Most are 50% or less.

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    I cannot think of any album that is 100% for me. The best are about 90%. Most are 50% or less.
    I don't even listen to all my own stuff (most of which has been lost, and what little remains is either ahead or behind its time).

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    This album worked 100% for me.
    This thread happened on right time to plug a friends brand new album.
    Akordionimeditatsioonid / Accordion Meditations - Album by Kulno Malva | Spotify

    Yeah. If its from a friend, you'll like it more

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    I don't even listen to all my own stuff (most of which has been lost, and what little remains is either ahead or behind its time).
    Are the remnants online?

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    Are the remnants online?
    Not yet. I'm working on it. Spoiler alert... Not jazz.

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Yes. Freddie Hubbard’s First Light. Although the entire album was only 5 songs. But each song was well done.


  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Yes. Freddie Hubbard’s First Light. Although the entire album was only 5 songs. But each song was well done.

    Those were some great CTI records in those days--Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Stanley Turrentine, George Benson...

    Another great one is the CTI Allstars at the Hollywood Bowl. All those cats were on it and many more.

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    Good subject. I think most albums I have contain at least a few duds. In some cases I avoid playing certain albums because of the lame (IMO) numbers. Jazz albums seem very consistent keeping the theme or vibe from start to finish. One thing that I don’t like are when they throw 3 alternative takes on one disc. Seems like lazy filler to me.

    I have cd’s playing all day long at my business for customers to hear. Another thing I don’t like much is when there is a live concert cd and after the song stops they boost the applause to a level higher than the actual music. I have many of those and they have been blacklisted from my playlist

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Those were some great CTI records in those days--Hubbard, Joe Henderson, Stanley Turrentine, George Benson...

    Another great one is the CTI Allstars at the Hollywood Bowl. All those cats were on it and many more.
    Those were the days man! I wore this album out while on ship soon after it came out. And yes, the US Navy had a turntable on board!


  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    Sort of on the flip side...back in the 90’s we heard that song I Get Knocked Down by Tubthumping. In those days sometimes I would buy a CD based on a single song I heard on the radio or that someone had raved about. 95% of the time I made a good choice.

    Well this was in the other 5%. That was the ONLY listenable song on the album. I think it was kind of a militant, leftist, British queer thing they had going on, but I’m not sure. I don’t think I listened to the CD more than once. I might still have it though in the archives...

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    If we’re talking about « non-jazz albums » :


    Pet Sounds – The Beach Boys
    Smile – The Beach Boys
    Moondog – Moondog
    Moondog 2 - Moondog
    Grace – Jeff Buckley
    In my Room – Jacob Collier
    Purple Rain – Prince
    Richard D. James – Aphex Twin
    VOCAbuLaries – Bobby McFerrin
    Histoire de Melody Nelson – Serge Gainsbourg
    Rubber Soul – The Beatles
    13 – Blur
    Odessey and Oracle – The Zombies
    Cheio de Dedos – Guinga

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    If we're talking about Jazz Albums, my list runs to every one of them I've ever owned. Seems like if you dig the way a guy plays it doesn't matter much what tune he's playing. And sometimes it can be enlightening to hear a great player working a silly pop song.

    I mean, I'm not a huge fan of Surrey with the Fringe on Top as a song, but I enjoy listening to Wes playing around with it.