Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 47 of 47
  1. #1
    Besides jazz, in the instrumental music area, do you like something ?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Actually, I hadn't thought about this, but for the most part, no. I tend not to like "guitar music."

    I can listen to a bit of surf music, that's fun for a bit. And I like the "flatpicking" genre, but usually there's some vocals sprinkled in which breaks it up a bit, in a good way.

    I definitely am not into "guitar player" music, like Tommy Emmanuel and Andy McKee and all of that "fingerstyle" stuff.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    I, too, like flat-picking. I'm actually not keen on bluegrass melodies, but some of the flat-pickers get a fair way from that these days and are great pickers. I do enjoy finger-pickers, too - most particularly the ragtime / ragtime-blues guys. And, more and more, I'm quite liking some of the old "plectrum" guitar players, who I guess may be considered jazzers, but I'm not sure how much improvisation is going on there.

    Derek

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Surf, definitely, or surf influenced. Khruangbin is cool... Sometimes even straight ahead rock like Joe Satriani.

    Soundtracks! So much cool stuff can find there. Like, I'm not exactly EDM fan, but I really enjoyed the movie Drive instrumental ambient electronic soundtrack.

    Actually I, myself, recording instrumental tracks, non jazz variety, (because jazz I like to play live, not with drum machines). I'm working on the new album right now.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Surf, definitely, or surf influenced. Khruangbin is cool... Sometimes even straight ahead rock like Joe Satriani.

    Soundtracks! So much cool stuff can find there. Like, I'm not exactly EDM fan, but I really enjoyed the movie Drive instrumental ambient electronic soundtrack.

    Actually I, myself, recording instrumental tracks, non jazz variety, (because jazz I like to play live, not with drum machines). I'm working on the new album right now.
    I should amend my post to include that I absolutely love Khraungbin.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu








  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Not strictly guitar music but the guitar is prominent. Greatest instrumental (non-jazz) band of all time????






  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I could listen to Haydn’s String Quartets or Piano Trios on “repeat all” for days on end - in fact I often do.


  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Where to begin? Folk, blues, jazz, ragtime... it's all good. Off the top of my head over the decades I've bought instrumental guitar recordings of:

    Guy Van Duser
    Eric Schoenberg
    Chet Atkins
    Merle Travis
    Martin Simpson
    Leo Kottke
    Gary Davis
    Ernie Hawkins
    Lasse Johansson
    John James
    Anyone who's been released on Kicking Mule...

    I'll stop now. If we include other, non-jazz instrumental music played on other instruments the list would be very long.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Actually, I hadn't thought about this, but for the most part, no. I tend not to like "guitar music."...
    I definitely am not into "guitar player" music, like Tommy Emmanuel and Andy McKee and all of that "fingerstyle" stuff.
    Amen brother! I'm with you on that one.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    I like classical guitar (and lute), also folk-type stuff like John Renbourn and Davey Graham. And blues guitar, not just electric but also acoustic/slide.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu






  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Oops, I missed "guitar" in the thread topic question.

    I like this:

    I consider this "guitar" music - I could listen to Renaissance guitar/vihuela/lute music all day.



    Quote Originally Posted by BickertRules View Post
    I could listen to Haydn’s String Quartets or Piano Trios on “repeat all” for days on end - in fact I often do.

    Last edited by BickertRules; 01-26-2021 at 03:19 PM.

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    I love rock instrumental- Steve Vai, Andy Timmons, Eric Johnson.

    Not sure if you'd call Duke Levine and Jim Campilongo "jazz", but I love them.

    Also stuff that *I* would consider jazz- some call it hillbilly jazz, like Jimmy Bryant and some of the Western swing stuff.

    Also, I have a couple of bluesy records that are mostly instrumental, by Ronnie Earl & The Broadcasters.

    Acoustic instrumental- Tommy Emmanuel, Al Petteway, Bryan Sutton

  16. #15
    From my country. Ive shared this song more than one time in then forum, because Im kinda obsesed with it .



    Paco de Lucia is other player I like.

    Should be more but thats at the top of my mind right now.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Johnny A, Danny Gatton, Manitas De Plata, Carlos Montoya, Hellecasters, Bert Jansch, John Fahey, Luis Bonfa, Baden Powell, Bola Sete, the Meters, Al Caiola, David Torn, Will Bernard, VM Bhatt, Santo and Johnny. And didn't Johnny Smith often say he wasn't a jazz musician?

    John

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    I listen to a lot of Tommy Guerrero. Perpetual and Road to Knowhere are his more recent guitar heavy albums, in my opinion. He has a unique mix of styles all his own.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    As it happens this is one of my favourite non-jazz guitar CDs:


  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Does this count?



  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    I like Segovia, Bream and Williams. That sort of thing. Always a refreshing change from jazz guitar after a while.

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Surf and ragtime, plus Norman Blake, Doc Watson, Merle Travis and Comer 'Moon' Mullins. Don't care for Tommy Emmanuel and that whole bunch of 'fancy' fingerpickers - bores me after about 2 minutes.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    where do I even start? I am pretty eclectic.

    I don’t think I ever listened to THAT much guitar, but I listened to that along with all sorts of classical music from solo to orchestra and still do. Grew up with Julian Breams recordings.

    Chris Thile’s solo Bach on mandolin is worth a listen for sure.

    And then there’s stuff like Anouar Brahem.... ECM world/jazz stuff that doesn’t fit into an easy category.

    Instrumental rock stuff mostly more for the instrument than the music itself, I have a soft spot for Satriani. Surfin with the Alien is a bop.

    I don’t honestly listen to that much music atm unless it’s for work. Which is a shame. If I do atm it’s probably going to the Radio 6 Music which is pretty eclectic; everything from
    the New York Dolls to Steve Reich’s clapping music. But they do play some interesting electronic music from time to time, which is sort of instrumental?

    I like the way they have musicians as presenters. Iggy Pop always plays interesting stuff.... thanks to that channel I learned Elton John is a massive Carla Bley fan. Who knew?

    I should probably get into Carnatic music having done a little Konnakol. Very beautiful.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Classical guitar, Segovia in particular, and Celtic guitar, especially Richard Thompson and John Renbourn. Lately, I've discovered Big Lazy, with Steve Ulrich on guitar. You might call them Jazz. I'm not sure, but I love'em. Even Ms. darkwaters became an instant fan. Their new album, Dear Trouble, is fantastic.


  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Chris Thile’s solo Bach on mandolin is worth a listen for sure.
    .
    Several listens actually.

  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    John Williams' recordings on his own label (JCW) feature a lot of his own writing, which sounds like it is influenced by Keith Jarret in places. Paco de Lucia's last record was of Spanish folk songs, laid-back and beautiful. Rafael Rabello played a great mix of Brazilian choros, samba and bossa along with classical pieces to which he actually improvised cadenzas, like the old classicists and baroque composers did. South African guitarist-composer Derek Gripper is amazingly original. Segovia's contemporaries Rey de la Torre and Alirio Diaz I find more musical and better technicians than the old man was, and Luis Bonfa is a most entertaining guitarist and composer. I tend to listen to more non-jazz guitar anyway, since I started my professional career as a nylon-string player doubling on electric and acoustic steel-string instruments, doing session and pit work as well as clubs and restaurants. Of all the very good acoustic Fingerstyle players, I always am moved and mystified by the spell Adrian Legg could cast, live or recorded.

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Except for Jazz, my guitar interests are almost all acoustic. I especially like, and my only formal study was in, classical guitar.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Nobody has mentioned Jeff Beck yet? Is the forum broken or something? ?

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Guinga! With Lula Galvão.

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    There's quite a bit of stuff, guitar-wise since you asked, that I like. And play. I'm really bad with jazz guitar but I've played folk acoustic for a long time and some of that is finger style. Really like Bruce Cockburn, solo especially, and lots of other people, some mentioned above, playing in that style.

    One of the other styles that takes up a significant amount of my listening time is electroacoustic, or acousmatic. That's not an acoustic/electric guitar as some people tend to think. That's computer processed music. And there is often a guitar involved as a sound source. But very, very different than jazz, or most other genres as well come to think of it.

    As an example, this is a link to my radio program and the Oliver Carman work 'Electric Strings' uses guitar as one of the sound sources.
    CKCU: Peter Batchelor, Oliver Carman, Ian Battenfield Headley, Konstantinos Karathanasis, Dominic Jasmin - Acoustic Frontiers - 2021-01-11

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Edson Lopes, Yamandu Costa, Pavel Steidl, Eduardo Fernandez, Roland Dyens, Fabio Zanon, Marcin Dylla--Classical/Brazilian Guitar performers; Wagner: Ring Cycle, Flying Dutchman; Schumann, Schubert, Haydn, Mertz, Beethoven, Chopin, Mendelssohn--orchestral; Classical Guitar Music: Llobet, Ponce, Mertz, Tarrega, Lauro, Sor, Cano, Ze Marcos. . . That's a lifetime of listening.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  32. #31

    User Info Menu


  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    Bach Bach Bach Bach Bach

    SDG

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    Tatyana Ryzhkova is a brilliant young classical guitarist from Belarus


  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by CarlD View Post
    Nobody has mentioned Jeff Beck yet? Is the forum broken or something? ?
    Love Jeff Beck.




  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    Tatyana Ryzhkova is a brilliant young classical guitarist from Belarus



    Hi, M,
    There's a wealth of talented CG's(and musicians in general) from Russia and Eastern European who play with remarkable feeling, personality, and nuance unlike the horde of American CG's who play, largely, IMO, like well-honed robots. Ana Vidovic and Pavel Steidl are two great Eastern European CG's. Perhaps they still maintain "old school" standards of excellence and artistry of the past.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    I love listening to guitar music and I listen to all sorts (other than metal and classic rock). Flamenco (and some of it's spin offs) get lots of play here. Some "next generation" surf like James Wilsey, John Blakely, The Vanduras. Instrumental rock including Jeff Beck, Lari Basilio, and Ray Montford (a brilliant Canadian player). Some of the modern acoustic players from the Michael Hedges stream. Thanks to YouTube I get to watch John Knowles who I think is one of the most inspiring guitarists I've ever heard And when I want to become a better player, I watch Chet Atkins videos. There's lots more.

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Campos View Post
    Guinga! With Lula Galvão.
    I love Guinga but this is really special. Just wonderful playing.

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    BTW Tatyana Ryzhkova has some good warmup/exercise videos (haha “exercise videos”) online, highly recommend.

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter View Post
    BTW Tatyana Ryzhkova has some good warmup/exercise videos (haha “exercise videos”) online, highly recommend.
    Hi, J,
    There's an inherent problem with music videos that my generation didn't have with LP's, cassettes, and CD's, recently--that a performer's visual appearance has the ability to effect the perception of a performance. Enough said.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Hi, J,
    There's an inherent problem with music videos that my generation didn't have with LP's, cassettes, and CD's, recently--that a performer's visual appearance has the ability to effect the perception of a performance. Enough said.
    Play live . . . Marinero
    I get your point, Marinero. Tatyana is one of the "creators" I support via Patreon and
    the videos there are often more casual in appearance and production. I got hooked when
    I first heard her play that Lauro piece - the expression and tempo change in the third
    part... it still gives me shivers even after repeated listening.

    Regarding your... and likely my, generation. My initial learning was done at 16 rpm, at
    half speed and an octave lower than concert pitch. It's almost too easy now.

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    I listen to lots of stuff but generally not guitar stuff.

    This is something else tho'

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky View Post
    I get your point, Marinero. Tatyana is one of the "creators" I support via Patreon and
    the videos there are often more casual in appearance and production. I got hooked when
    I first heard her play that Lauro piece - the expression and tempo change in the third
    part... it still gives me shivers even after repeated listening.

    Regarding your... and likely my, generation. My initial learning was done at 16 rpm, at
    half speed and an octave lower than concert pitch. It's almost too easy now.

    Hi, M,
    Tatyana is a very emotive player--the first thing I listen for in a performance. Sound, however, is difficult to judge with the incredible machinations/creativity found in today's recording studios. For the record(no pun intended),I always prefer to hear a musician play live.
    Play live . . . Marinero

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    I kinda like stuff like this. Not particularly advanced, but great if you're working .. or even on a long walk.


  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Marinero I would be willing to make the sacrifice to go and see Ms. Rhyzkova in person.
    I may even look at the guitar.
    Maybe. ?
    jk model year 1952

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    It occurred to me that I left out the three guitarists that I've listened to the most over the last few years: Dominic Miller, Cenk Erdogan and Antonio Forcione. They've all veered towrds jazz at times but none of the three would really be considered "jazz" guitarists.

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway View Post
    It occurred to me that I left out the three guitarists that I've listened to the most over the last few years: Dominic Miller, Cenk Erdogan and Antonio Forcione. They've all veered towrds jazz at times but none of the three would really be considered "jazz" guitarists.
    Dominic is great, always liked him .. Even if his most known tune is totally outside jazz (tho the lyrics are not his)

    I remember transcribing the guitar part back in the day .. Fun times

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jazzkritter View Post
    Marinero I would be willing to make the sacrifice to go and see Ms. Rhyzkova in person.
    I may even look at the guitar.
    Maybe. ?
    jk model year 1952
    Yes, J,
    I'd love to see her perform live based on her video. The only thing you can't tell from a CD, record, video, etc. is the musician's SOUND. Back in the Stone Age when I first began the study of CG, one of my favorite musicians was Liona Boyd based on her LP's. However, when I finally saw her perform live (early 90's) in a northern Chicago suburb, her sound was weak/thin and I was very disappointed. It was then I realized that a musician's talent is a combination of technique, interpretation and sound . . . a difficult trio to master. However, sound, IMO, is a function of personality and many great technical players lack convincing sound and that's a whole other discussion.

    Play live . . . Marinero