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  1. #1

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    Seems like an optimal cut for crazy glue. Straight clean cut. Just wondering if crazy glue would be safe.

    I'm on blood thinner... I cleaned it real good, applied liquid styptic, and then pressure for 20 minutes, bleeding had pretty much stopped, more styptic for good measure, then liquid bandage. Image is after all that , the cut is cleaner than it looks, that's just some dried blood on the edges.

    In my shelter in place mode... my daily activities I can't do for a while for fear of opening it up: Rowing Machine, weight lifting, band workout, golf backyard driving range (mat, foam balls, net), fingerpicking (I think I'd be okay with a plectrum which will be a shift in right hand technique). If I used crazy glue, I'd be fine for all that, right? I'd have to reopen the cut for crazy glue I suppose.
    Attached Images Attached Images Cut my finger, Crazy Glue?-cut-small-jpg 
    Last edited by fep; 01-15-2021 at 01:15 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Just found something called Dermabond, medical superglue. Amazon $299.99, yikes. I'll pass.

  4. #3

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    From my limited and decidedly non-medical experience/expertise, I think that cut is too far down the scab/healing cycle for super glue to do much good. When I have had success with super glue it has been when there is a clean flap to close, the bleeding has stopped but there is no scabbing started yet. Your mileage may completely vary...

    My 2c.

  5. #4

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    Cyanoacrylate, aka "superglue", is safe, AFAIK. It's used by surgeons regularly. I don't know if it will hold that cut, but I would probably chance it. Just be careful with the application, don't use too much, and don't get it deep into the cut.

  6. #5

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    Ouch!!

    As for myself, I'd give it 5 days healing with conventional bandage & care.

    I'm resting my fretting-hand index finger right now, but I'm not otherwise as
    active as you.

    Best to you.

  7. #6

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    I had put a Phillips bit in an electric drill once and slipped, the bit caught me on the inside of the first joint of the index finger of my fretting hand. Because the bit was spinning it wasn't a straight razor type cut, kinda tore a hole in my finger. I had gigs the next 2 nights so I was scrambling to get it fixed well enough to make the jobs.
    I bought some special band aides [can't remember the name] and they got me through but it was really painful, especially playing bar chords when the string would put pressure on the cut.
    It really wasn't the type of cut CA would fix.

  8. #7

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    On that cut super glue would probably work nicely. I know fromLots of experience it doesn’t work on a finger tip very well with a razor type cut

  9. #8

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    Ouch! Fingers crossed for a speedy healing, Frank.

  10. #9

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    Liquid Bandage is just a variety of super glue as far as I can see. But I could be wrong. I have been wrong before, I think that time was also on a Saturday.

    Cheers

  11. #10

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    If I were you I'd just make a bandage (unless you're left handed, that would be yikes)

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by thelostboss
    Liquid Bandage is just a variety of super glue as far as I can see. But I could be wrong. I have been wrong before, I think that time was also on a Saturday.

    Cheers
    Yes that is correct. It is CA glue. It works on some wounds, especially if there is a little flap of skin that needs to be glued down. Reapply at least daily.

    A thin application of super glue will also provide a bit of callus for the fingertips, if, like me sometimes, you have put aside playing for awhile and the calluses have worn off.

    It is also a great finish for small wood projects especially on the lathe. It is truly the “superfood” of adhesive products.

  13. #12

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    Cyanoacrylate is not flexible. My bottle of Liquid Bandage says the inactive ingredients (other than antiseptic and analgesic) are acetone, amyl acetate, castor oil, ethyl acetate, nitrocellulose, and SD alcohol 40. No mention of cyanoacrylate. That said, it might actually work better in that wound than superglue, because it's flexible, and provides some antiseptic and analgesic properties.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Cyanoacrylate is not flexible. My bottle of Liquid Bandage says the inactive ingredients (other than antiseptic and analgesic) are acetone, amyl acetate, castor oil, ethyl acetate, nitrocellulose, and SD alcohol 40. No mention of cyanoacrylate. That said, it might actually work better in that wound than superglue, because it's flexible, and provides some antiseptic and analgesic properties.
    I have new-skin liquid bandage. The bottle says "Ingredients", see carton. I don't have the carton. Doesn't seem to behave like super glue, for example to remove from skin you just reapply and wipe it off, i.e. it will dissolve the dried version of itself.

  15. #14

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    That's the acetone in it. Acetone is a very effective solvent, which will dissolve nail polish and also cyanoacrylate, among many others. It is very effective on nitrocellulose, which is also one of the ingredients in liquid bandage. Don't consider playing your guitar while the liquid bandage is still wet. As if you needed that warning. I can also report that liquid bandage very definitely stings when it's applied to a cut. That soon stops, though.

  16. #15

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    Any sign of redness around or heading down the palm or up the finger it’s clinic/ER time.
    Infection would be a lot worse
    I ain’t no doc but hopefully one could comment.... steri strips instead of CA goo?

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    I have new-skin liquid bandage. The bottle says "Ingredients", see carton. I don't have the carton. Doesn't seem to behave like super glue, for example to remove from skin you just reapply and wipe it off, i.e. it will dissolve the dried version of itself.

    • Active ingredient. Benzethonium Chloride 0.2%
    • Purpose. Antiseptic (First aid to help prevent bacterial contamination in minor cuts and scrapes)
    • Inactive Ingredients. Amyl acetate, camphor, ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol, n-butyl acetate, nitrocellulose.



    I used to use that when I bowled a lot and got a tear (or a blister) on my thumb.
    I cut a finger in the kitchen sometimes and it works well for that.
    I haven't had a cut as angry looking as yours in a long time. Happy healing!

  18. #17

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    Hydrogen Peroxide every 15 minutes will disinfect and seal it up

  19. #18

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    I don't think that OTC new-skin (the product) is as strong as what the docs use in the ER. I could be wrong, but I've had both and that's my impression.

    I have used superglue -- but I wasn't convinced I did a very good job with it.

    My current approach is new-skin and immobilization. A well-cleaned wound, immoblized so you're not continually tearing it open, heals pretty quickly.

    One thing about superglue -- you can sand it. In fact, it takes sanding beautifully. It will wear or flake off fairly quickly, but you can re-apply and sand again.

  20. #19

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    A doctor friend was having guests over for supper. While cutting onions, the knife slipped and gave her a nasty looking cut right across the nail of her pinky. She reached for super glue (and some antibiotics). Seemed to work well for her.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Cyanoacrylate is not flexible. My bottle of Liquid Bandage says the inactive ingredients (other than antiseptic and analgesic) are acetone, amyl acetate, castor oil, ethyl acetate, nitrocellulose, and SD alcohol 40. No mention of cyanoacrylate. That said, it might actually work better in that wound than superglue, because it's flexible, and provides some antiseptic and analgesic properties.
    To be honest I don't know what I have at home. I thought it was CA glue--I could be wrong.

    I do know that in the ER and for surgery Dermabond is used, which is CA glue. I don't know if you can get this OTC.

    Dermabond: Surgical Skin Glue - USA Medical and Surgical Supplies

  22. #21

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    From the link, it appears that it can be purchased by anyone with enough money. Depending on the type, it's cyanoacrylate, some with plasticizers and accelerants to speed the cure and make it somewhat flexible, according to the linked ads. Some is just cyanoacrylate with some colors added. The formulation seems to vary depending on the intended use. The biggest advantage of cyanoacrylate is the fast cure, although this isn't an advantage in every application, sometimes a slower cure is better, sometimes faster is better. For closing wounds, I suppose faster is usually better, as it is for most uses. I don't use much of it now, because it doesn't keep for long after being opened, and the cure is too fast and the process is messy. I've come to prefer UV resin, because it doesn't start to cure until exposed to UV light, and can be cleaned up easily before being exposed to UV. I like it for nut and saddle repairs, as well as general adhesive use. But I wouldn't apply it to a wound, just as I wouldn't apply lots of things. Cyanoacrylate is certainly useful for many things, and closing wounds is one. The only health use for UV resin that I'm aware of is by dentists, for gluing crowns in place. It seems to work very well for that.

    As the saying goes, "horses for courses".

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    From the link, it appears that it can be purchased by anyone with enough money. Depending on the type, it's cyanoacrylate, some with plasticizers and accelerants to speed the cure and make it somewhat flexible, according to the linked ads. Some is just cyanoacrylate with some colors added. The formulation seems to vary depending on the intended use. The biggest advantage of cyanoacrylate is the fast cure, although this isn't an advantage in every application, sometimes a slower cure is better, sometimes faster is better. For closing wounds, I suppose faster is usually better, as it is for most uses. I don't use much of it now, because it doesn't keep for long after being opened, and the cure is too fast and the process is messy. I've come to prefer UV resin, because it doesn't start to cure until exposed to UV light, and can be cleaned up easily before being exposed to UV. I like it for nut and saddle repairs, as well as general adhesive use. But I wouldn't apply it to a wound, just as I wouldn't apply lots of things. Cyanoacrylate is certainly useful for many things, and closing wounds is one. The only health use for UV resin that I'm aware of is by dentists, for gluing crowns in place. It seems to work very well for that.

    As the saying goes, "horses for courses".
    I hope it works well for that. I had 3 crowns put in early in 2020. I'd like to avoid any unplanned visits to the dentist for a long time...

  24. #23

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    I have some that have been in place for close to 10 years. Still firmly in place.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    I have some that have been in place for close to 10 years. Still firmly in place.
    2 years ago I ate a Greek salad with some black olives—didn’t realize they were unfitted. Broke the corner off a crown.

    The only thing worse than having a crown put on is having it removed, and then the nub ground down again to accommodate the new crown. But I agree the adhesives are wonderful.

  26. #25

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    Super glue can be a viable option if used under the right circumstances (small and clean cut, not too deep and not infectious). If you choose to use household super glue or even over-the-counter adhesive products, do so with caution and full understanding of the risks, including infection and scarring.