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  1. #101
    Al Green. A soul singer from Arkansas. A reverend who after owning the charts began an equally great and longstanding Gospel career. Winner of 11 Grammys. Induction into the RNR Hall of Fame in 1995. Included in The Rolling Stones top 100 singers of all time. Known as the last great soul singer. there was only 1 Al Green. Here’s the tune he’s known for, Let’s stay together.


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102
    Barry White. The Maestro. It’s shocking he only won 2 Grammys for he had 4 albums that topped the charts. Barry was a self taught player and learned to read music and produce on his first album. He never looked back and the world was his oyster. His performance owned the Merv Griffin Show. This tune defined him in 1974. Reaching number 1 on Billboard is Barry and his Love Unlimited Orchestra. Here’s Love’s Theme.


  4. #103

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    my favorite Al Green tune...


  5. #104
    Here’s Donny Hathaway’s live version of What’s Goin On, and The Ghetto which features many great players in their own right. His live version of WGO is a brilliant arrangement that’s a respectable nod to Marvin Gaye.




  6. #105
    This tune has Philadelphia International Records all over it. Here’s Teddy Pendergrass with his sermon to love in 1971’s I Miss You.


  7. #106
    Here’s another soulful ballad from 360 degrees of Billy Paul. I’m gonna make it this time.


  8. #107
    A child, with a golden voice, 10 years old in 1970 leads his older brother’s on a musical quest. Michael Jackson led the airwaves both as a kid and an adult. Here’s Multi Grammy winners with their I’ll be there.


  9. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    I really liked many Motown songs back in the day. And still do. And still listen to them. All popular, maybe too "commercial," not "sophisticated," according to some. So be it. But great songs nevertheless. Almost all are from the 1960s. Topping the list are:

    Contours: Do You Love Me
    Miracles: The Tracks of My Tears
    Marvelettes : Please Mr. Postman

    The others:

    Miracles: You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me
    Miracles: Shop Around
    Martha and the Vandellas: Heatwave
    Little Stevie Wonder: Fingertips
    Martha & the Vandellas: Dancing in the Street
    Temptations: My Girl
    Four Tops: Reach Out
    Temptations: Ain’t Too Proud to Beg
    Four Tops: Standing in the Shadows of Love
    Marvin Gaye: I Heard It Through the Grapevine
    Four Tops: Bernadette
    Marvin Gaye: What’s Going On
    Stevie Wonder: Superstition
    Temptations: Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone
    Marvin Gaye: Let’s Get It On

    I’ve undoubtedly forgotten many.
    When the funk bros guitarist played the intro to My Girl I wonder if he knew how many other guitarists would play it?

  10. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    I really liked many Motown songs back in the day. And still do. And still listen to them. All popular, maybe too "commercial," not "sophisticated," according to some. So be it. But great songs nevertheless. Almost all are from the 1960s. Topping the list are:

    Contours: Do You Love Me
    Miracles: The Tracks of My Tears
    Marvelettes : Please Mr. Postman

    The others:

    Miracles: You’ve Really Got a Hold on Me
    Miracles: Shop Around
    Martha and the Vandellas: Heatwave
    Little Stevie Wonder: Fingertips
    Martha & the Vandellas: Dancing in the Street
    Temptations: My Girl
    Four Tops: Reach Out
    Temptations: Ain’t Too Proud to Beg
    Four Tops: Standing in the Shadows of Love
    Marvin Gaye: I Heard It Through the Grapevine
    Four Tops: Bernadette
    Marvin Gaye: What’s Going On
    Stevie Wonder: Superstition
    Temptations: Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone
    Marvin Gaye: Let’s Get It On

    I’ve undoubtedly forgotten many.
    When the session funk bros guitarist played the intro to My Girl I wonder if he had any idea how many other guitarists would play it? that he was making musical history with a very,very popular song?

  11. #110
    Stars? Planets? Galaxies?! Who could make a hit song out of that? The 5th Dimension did. They had a strong showing during the 60’s when it was everything goes. Here’s their Aquarius/Let the sun shine.


  12. #111
    The 1971 Ed Sullivan show presents The Temptations with Just my imagination.


  13. #112
    Smokey and the miracles. Ooh baby, baby.


  14. #113
    His career traversed the 70’s and 80’s. He formed a band of high school players. They wrote their own music. Then Lionel Ritchie launched a solo career. And sold many more records. Multi Grammy winner. Songwriters Hall of Fame Johnny Mercer award winner. Oscar and Golden Globe winner. Sold over 90 million records as a solo performer. Here’s All night long.


  15. #114
    Two brothers with a very solid band who had many hit albums, both in the 70’s and a huge resurgence in the 80’s after pairing with the great producer Eumir Deodato. Two time Grammy winner and a Songwriter hall of fame award amongst them, here’s Kool and the Gangs Celebration.


  16. #115
    Brook Benton’s 1970 mega hit A rainy night in Georgia.


  17. #116
    Tyrone Davis and his 1970 hit If I could turn back the hands of time.


  18. #117
    1970 Philly soul. The Delfonics and their Didn’t I blow your mind this time.


  19. #118
    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Stars? Planets? Galaxies?! Who could make a hit song out of that? The 5th Dimension did. They had a strong showing during the 60’s when it was everything goes. Here’s their Aquarius/Let the sun shine.

    Thanks for posting! I listened to an interview with Joe Osborne the other night on YT and I believe he played bass strings for about 15 years on one set. I think he was the bass player on this cut. When I was in music school and did not have much money I learned to take off my flat wound strings and boil them for about 15 min. They didnot sound as good as new but it helped right before an important performance. I have not had to do that for a while but with the price of some brands I might! ha!

  20. #119
    1970 The Moments Love on a two way street.


  21. #120
    1970 Eddie Holman Hey there lonely girl.


  22. #121
    Chicago’s own, the Chi-lites. 1971’s The coldest days of my life.


  23. #122
    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    His career traversed the 70’s and 80’s. He formed a band of high school players. They wrote their own music. Then Lionel Ritchie launched a solo career. And sold many more records. Multi Grammy winner. Songwriters Hall of Fame Johnny Mercer award winner. Oscar and Golden Globe winner. Sold over 90 million records as a solo performer. Here’s All night long.

    Jacob Collier has a good version of this on YT. Tell It Like It like is and You Dont Know Me are soulful songs from this era. Arron Neville has a distinctive voice and appearance! If someone had told me a dude with a dagger tat on his face would be a great soul singer I may not have believed it. The duet with him and Linda Ronstadt is really good.

  24. #123

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    Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye are probably my fav Motown artists. From Stax Records i really enjoy their blues music roster, like Otis Redding, Albert Collins stuff, etc. Anything i 've heard from these companies is great music, i guess it comes with the era.

  25. #124
    Guitar player extraordinare based group The Isley Bros. 1973s Who’s that lady.


  26. #125
    1975s That’s the way of the world by EWF.


  27. #126
    RNR Hall of Fame, Songwriters Hall of Fame, Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, Marvins 1973 hit, Come get to this.


  28. #127
    Marvin Gayes Live 1974 hit, Distant Lover


  29. #128
    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye are probably my fav Motown artists. From Stax Records i really enjoy their blues music roster, like Otis Redding, Albert Collins stuff, etc. Anything i 've heard from these companies is great music, i guess it comes with the era.
    Frosty and Snoecone were the first shuffles I ever heard and learned. They were often used to start the set at club gigs. Hideaway by Freddie King and the Beano album were some other early ones. Do some members know much about the history of guitar based shuffles?

  30. #129
    In 1981 disco had come and gone. But soul was still soul and great singers were everywhere. None more gifted than Luthier Vandross. He sang for years backing named acts. Now on his own here his is singing his hit A house is not a home, for a live audience.

    Last edited by 2bornot2bop; 10-06-2020 at 03:06 PM.

  31. #130
    Everyday I have the Blues by BB King Live At The Regal in Chicago is a great early example I bet Room Full Of Blues would have some!

  32. #131
    Is there a soul version of People Who Need People?

  33. #132

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve burchfield
    Is there a soul version of People Who Need People?

  34. #133
    There is a dynamite version of People Who Need People With Barbara Streisand and Stevie Wonder!!! has great nylon string guitar intro really TOP NOTCH!!!

  35. #134
    Quote Originally Posted by Gitfiddler
    Thank you! Great version! Rays country album with You Dont Know Me was an industry game changer in a good way! Maybe some can post it. To me it does not get any BLUER!

  36. #135
    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Brook Benton’s 1970 mega hit A rainy night in Georgia.

    There is a up and coming blues man named Lucious Spiller who does a cover on YT. I did not know Tony Joe White from Gator got your Granny Polk Salad Annie wrote this but I think he did . I understand Lucious has been working at Morgan Freemans blues joint in Clarksdale, Mississippi. He is the real deal although its hard to top an original classic.

  37. #136
    The Godmother of Soul. Born and raised in Philadelphia, PA. She's a special lady with a special voice, and she's been singing for six decades. And no one, absolutely no one has ever sung Over The Rainbow quite like Patti Labelle. She brings it! Here she is in a 1991 Apollo Theater performance. Love you Patti!


  38. #137
    Combine a producer like Quincy, and a singer like James Ingrams and you get 100 Ways. And then James follows that hit up with Just Once. And just because, Joey DeFrancesco does a very soulful jazzy version of Just Once.






  39. #138

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    Unbelievably, we've been this far without a mention of Mucle Shoals. While most of the music covered so far was urban, very much a product of the big city, Muscle Shoals was out in the boonies and had a funky vibe of it's own that was local flavor. The Swampers were one of my favorite studio bands and their legacy to music is huge.




  40. #139
    A song that would define so much about it’s time by a songwriter who was like no other. Marvin Gaye’s What’s Going On definitely set the bar very high for there was nothing like it. And Motown didn’t want to release what they saw as a protest record. Barry Gordy was clueless. But Marvin refuses to work on anything else until it was released. Barry was outvoted by Motown management. It was then released and the rest as they say was history.


  41. #140
    Another hot recording that was part of the soundtrack for the 60’s. Here’s the Four Tops with Baby I Need Your Lovin.


  42. #141
    Chic lit a fire in 1979 with their Good Times.


  43. #142
    Curtis Mayfield’s Move On Up was a musical extravaganza of what epitomized a hit in 1970. The horns and rhythm section were phenomenal and way ahead of its time.


  44. #143

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  45. #144
    1975 Love to love you baby lit up the RnB charts. It became an anthem for disco with its long play version. Donna Summers was on fire. She had a slew of other hits like MacArthur Park and Last Dance. She became known as the Queen of disco.


  46. #145
    Smokey’s Tracks of my tears kept that Smokey flame flowing with another hit!


  47. #146
    And in 1970 Smokey’s Tears of a clown would define my high school days.


  48. #147
    Quote Originally Posted by unknownguitarplayer
    In my non-musical life, I often teach 1-week courses in Detroit to professionals who come here from all over the world. To put them at ease on the first day, I used to start with a pop-quiz, and ask them "Does anybody know what 2648 W. Grand Boulevard is?" There used to always be at least a few people in the who knew the answer, which gave me an excuse to give a mini-lecture on the Funk Brothers, and many times I'd give out DVDs of "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" to the winners.

    Over the past few years, fewer and fewer people knew the answer, to the point where I stopped asking. I guess it was naive to think that Motown would always be the "Sound of Young America."

    Yes, isn’t it pathetic that this generation doesn’t know its history. And forget jazz, that was 3 generations ago. They know nothing because they don’t understand the value of history. But question? Where the hell is this generation’s Motown? Crickets. All we have is a foul mouthed thing trying to imitate itself as music. Where are the horns? Oh, they don’t play them or read music, they simply sample. As if sampling is an art form. It’s laziness. But it doesn’t help that the schools have been annihilated for who teaches music in schools? Sad days from people who don’t or won’t acknowledge their own greatness.

  49. #148
    Back on a more positive note. What’s more so than Bill Withers and his Lovely Day.


  50. #149
    And Lean on me.


  51. #150
    Born in 1958 Anita Baker arrived later on the scene. But did she ever make up for lost time winning 8 Grammys. Here’s Sweet Love from her 1986 ultra winning Rapture album.