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    Listening to the Cream 2005 Royal Albert Hall album recently—really fine album by the old guys. I think it might be Clapton’s best live work since the 70’s. Bruce’s voice sounds great, and his bass really comes out in the mix. And Ginger Baker, while lacking the fire of his youth, still holds it all together.

    Surprising that this was 37 years after their last live performance. The earlier live Cream stuff was fun and more energetic, but so poorly recorded and/or mixed. Technology has come a long way since the 60’s. (Maybe the 2005 album had a ton more post—production work and overdubs? Still sounds much better sound-wise.)

    I was trying to think of another group that “got the band together” and went on the road one more time, with such good results. The Zeppelin reunion live album was pretty good, though the Plant/Page album No Quarter was even better. (And How the West Was Won is the definitive Zep live album.)

    The Eagles (most of them anyway) put out some good albums years after they broke up in a hissy, but their recordings are not a revelation compared to the studio versions.

    I’ve seen Fleetwood Mac a couple of times and they still put on a good show, but not as good as they did in the 70’s.

    I think Cream outdid themselves though, at least in terms of their sound and the professionalism of their performances. Being completely sober (well who knows what Ginger was imbibing) probably helped a lot.

    Any other live reunion albums worth listening to? Jazz? Country?

    (The Allman Brothers come to mind—late career live albums with Derek and Warren just popped into my head, but they never really STOPPED playing together, did they? Not really reunion albums...)

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    Well this is kind of a real left-fielder but Mudcrutch reunited, and their studio and live albums were just superlative. Worth waiting 40 years for I guess.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Well this is kind of a real left-fielder but Mudcrutch reunited, and their studio and live albums were just superlative. Worth waiting 40 years for I guess.
    I read a lot about Mudcrutch in Paul Zollo's book of Tom Petty interviews. Good read.

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  5. #4

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    Cream 2005 Royal Albert Hall
    Love this album! And yes, Eric was in fine form for the gig.

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    BTW, if you listen to the 1968 live album, Crossroads starts out at about 70 bpm then speeds up to about 100. Seems that way to me anyway. Not sure if it was intentional, or just the adrenaline catching up with them. That song played that way needs a little speed if you ask me.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff
    Listening to the Cream 2005 Royal Albert Hall album recently—really fine album by the old guys. I think it might be Clapton’s best live work since the 70’s. Bruce’s voice sounds great, and his bass really comes out in the mix. And Ginger Baker, while lacking the fire of his youth, still holds it all together.

    Surprising that this was 37 years after their last live performance. The earlier live Cream stuff was fun and more energetic, but so poorly recorded and/or mixed. Technology has come a long way since the 60’s. (Maybe the 2005 album had a ton more post—production work and overdubs? Still sounds much better sound-wise.)

    I was trying to think of another group that “got the band together” and went on the road one more time, with such good results. The Zeppelin reunion live album was pretty good, though the Plant/Page album No Quarter was even better. (And How the West Was Won is the definitive Zep live album.)

    The Eagles (most of them anyway) put out some good albums years after they broke up in a hissy, but their recordings are not a revelation compared to the studio versions.

    I’ve seen Fleetwood Mac a couple of times and they still put on a good show, but not as good as they did in the 70’s.

    I think Cream outdid themselves though, at least in terms of their sound and the professionalism of their performances. Being completely sober (well who knows what Ginger was imbibing) probably helped a lot.

    Any other live reunion albums worth listening to? Jazz? Country?

    (The Allman Brothers come to mind—late career live albums with Derek and Warren just popped into my head, but they never really STOPPED playing together, did they? Not really reunion albums...)
    I totally agree with your comments about Cream's Royal Albert Hall album. Excellent. And superior production values plus fewer excesses compared with the earlier stuff. I think the Clapton/Stevie Winwood "reunion" live album also was pretty good. So was Led Zeppelin's live concert album, Celebration Day that you mention. Despite, in my opinion, Jimmy Page's overuse of guitar effects.