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  1. #1

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    I ran across this video of "Pent Up House" in which a fellow played a mandolin. Forgive me if this has been posted before, but I have to say I love how it cut through the mix. I assume it was an electric mandolin, right? Is there such a thing or was it just mic'd up? Either way, I enjoyed the tone and the player. It was so "ever-present."

    I have read here where many don't like playing their archtops past the 12th fret, but if it is going to give me this kind of sound, I am going to have to break that practice and give it a try.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Pete Martin who hangs on the board quietly is a fine jazz player on his mandolin...


  4. #3

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    The electric mandolin has been a thing since before Tiny Moore had Paul Bigsby build one for him, somewhere around 1950. For a more recent take, check Don Stiernberg and Paul Glasse. Especially Stiernberg. He has a trio that includes Andy Brown, and they're killer. Lots of videos on YouTube.

    Tiny Moore forced me to start building electric mandolins, because I couldn't find any to buy. Michael Stevens built a lot of them, but I'm not sure he's still working at it.
    Last edited by sgosnell; 09-16-2020 at 10:38 PM.

  5. #4

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    David Grisman made a record w jazz violinist Stephane Grappelli in the 80s I believe

  6. #5

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    Grisman did ground-breaking work bringing 70s jazz to the string-band. Here's the "Quintet '80" band in action -- Mark O'Connor (guitar), Darol Anger (violin), Mike Marshall (mandolin) and Rob Wasserman (bass) playing "Dawg's Rag"



    People don't need to like jazz to like this.

  7. #6

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    garcia & grisman do miles


    so what?



    cheers

  8. #7

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    Here's some mando jazz, from when Tiny was still using a modified Gibson A model. This is some of what ruined my life for awhile.


    Mission to Moscow was first recorded by Benny Goodman. I'm sure everyone has heard the other tune. Tiny Moore could play.


  9. #8

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    Also Jason Anick and Aaron Weinstein. Weinstein has a couple of albums that feature John Pizzarelli, and he's on some of Bucky's albums.

  10. #9

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    Nice playing!

    Chris Thile is one of the current masters of the instrument who has shown he can play pretty much anything on his mando. He has more of a classical focus than many of the well-known players, who tend toward bluegrass.

    And David Grisman is just in his own category. Like Doc Watson or Bela Fleck or Stefan Grapelli. Sui generis.]

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Here's some mando jazz, from when Tiny was still using a modified Gibson A model. This is some of what ruined my life for awhile.


    Mission to Moscow was first recorded by Benny Goodman. I'm sure everyone has heard the other tune. Tiny Moore could play.

    Always dug that version of Mission, very hip. They were really dipping into jazz by the time the Tiffany transcriptions were recorded and they had the twin guitars thing going on w Tiny.
    Big Bob Wills Texas Playboys fan

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    I ran across this video of "Pent Up House" in which a fellow played a mandolin. Forgive me if this has been posted before, but I have to say I love how it cut through the mix. I assume it was an electric mandolin, right? Is there such a thing or was it just mic'd up? Either way, I enjoyed the tone and the player. It was so "ever-present."

    I have read here where many don't like playing their archtops past the 12th fret, but if it is going to give me this kind of sound, I am going to have to break that practice and give it a try.

    I have had the privilege of playing with three of those guys, including the mandolinist. He has a great feel for this music and I learned something from him about how to comp. I've also learned a good deal from the guitarist who has many videos on youtube.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry
    Grisman did ground-breaking work bringing 70s jazz to the string-band. Here's the "Quintet '80" band in action -- Mark O'Connor (guitar), Darol Anger (violin), Mike Marshall (mandolin) and Rob Wasserman (bass) playing "Dawg's Rag"



    People don't need to like jazz to like this.
    that's the same band on the Grappelli lp minus Anger, I guess it was Grisman's working band at the time

  14. #13

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    Good stuff!!

    How about this as a starter - a Rogue Electric Mandolin 99.00 US dollars

    Rogue RM110AE Acoustic-Electric A-Style Mandolin Sunburst | Guitar Center

  15. #14

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    Don Stiernberg is also top of the class for jazz mandolin. Here he is in an acoustic trio setting:


    He has played with everyone, including Jethro and Grisman. Here’s a lengthy interview from the cafe.

    Still want more info on jazz mandolin? There’s a ton of info here.

    This is my all-time favorite Stiernberg track:

  16. #15

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    David Grisman also has some albums with Martin Taylor. Most are acoustic duets, but one has a quartet, and it's really excellent jazz playing by all. Taylor is better known for playing set pieces, but on this one he and Grisman both demonstrate that they can improvise as well as almost anyone. Here is a tune I like:

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Always dug that version of Mission, very hip. They were really dipping into jazz by the time the Tiffany transcriptions were recorded and they had the twin guitars thing going on w Tiny.
    Big Bob Wills Texas Playboys fan
    tiffany transcriptions long my fave wills recordings...

    wills had some great guitarists..jimmy wyble, junior barnard, eldon shamblin

    cheers

  18. #17

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    The original "twin guitars" thing was Jimmy Wyble and Cameron Hill. Later it went through several iterations, including Leon McAuliffe/Eldon Shamblin, and by the time the Tiffany Transcriptions were recorded, it was a trio playing like a horn section, with Shamblin, Herb Remington, and Tiny Moore. That section was a great sound.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    I ran across this video of "Pent Up House" in which a fellow played a mandolin. Forgive me if this has been posted before, but I have to say I love how it cut through the mix. I assume it was an electric mandolin, right? Is there such a thing or was it just mic'd up? Either way, I enjoyed the tone and the player. It was so "ever-present."

    I have read here where many don't like playing their archtops past the 12th fret, but if it is going to give me this kind of sound, I am going to have to break that practice and give it a try.

    I'm a bit surprised that nobody mentioned the guitarist in the video is our forum member Reg.

  20. #19

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    The Tiffany Transcriptions are a treasure, as is Tiny. He sounds very Charlie Christian like at times on these.

    Mandolin works great acoustically in a jazz setting if the other instruments aren’t too loud. I’ve played several times in duos with piano or trios with bass where we play with no PA in small places and they hear us just fine. When playing with horns and drums, I will play 5 string electric.

    I did a recording of Wes Montgomery tunes a couple years back, it’s a free download for anyone interested.
    Jazz-Mandolin Pete Martin Plays Wes Montgomery

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    I'm a bit surprised that nobody mentioned the guitarist in the video is our forum member Reg.
    Thanks for pointing that out. That was/is a nice, little band there. They definitely had that "groove" that Reg often alludes to. And I was groovin.'

  22. #21

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    the late great john abercrombie often recorded with electric mandolin...his first was the classic fender 4 string



    JK: On a duet album you did with John Scofield you cover Wes Montgomery’s “Four on Six.” It sounds great on that.

    JA: That particular tune came out very well and there’s one of Scofield’s called “Small Wonder” that I used a chorus effect on.

    JK: Did you ever listen to Tiny Moore when he played in Bob Wills’ band?

    JA: Actually the first mandolin player I ever heard was Jethro Burns of Homer and Jethro and I heard a bit of Tiny Moore but I really had no exposure to the mandolin or bluegrass. I’d heard Homer & Jethro [Burns] and that stuck with me. Later I heard David Grisman and liked him a lot but that’s quite different. Mostly my inspiration came from seeing Jerry Goodman’s Fender.


    Small Wonder: John Abercrombie Loves His Electric Mandolin | Fretboard Journal



    cheers

  23. #22

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    Ah but John tuned his like a guitar not a mandolin...

  24. #23

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    This is one of those performances that I revisit over and over. I am very interested in the mandolin. Is it acoustic electric like an acoustic electric guitar? Or does it have an electric guitar pickup? Who is the player? I hear very mice reverb, does
    It come from the amp? Can someone recommend one? Thanks for any info.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Sherry
    ...Here's the "Quintet '80" band in action -- Mark O'Connor (guitar), Darol Anger (violin), Mike Marshall (mandolin) and Rob Wasserman (bass) playing "Dawg's Rag"

    Mark O’Connor, on guitar in this video, is best known as a violinist/fiddler at this point in his life, but he is also a mandocello aficionado.

    Here’s an Instagram link to my image of his concert with his wife here in the pines last year. Apparently he’s had this 1914 Gibson mando since he was a kid.

    Login • Instagram

    I’ll try to dig up the original image on my Big iMac later for folks who don’t do I-gram.

    Re Abercrombie’s tuning tendency, I tune my mandola like a 4-string guitar. No tuning paradigm shift required.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhl-ferndale
    Mark O’Connor, on guitar in this video, is best known as a violinist/fiddler at this point in his life, but he is also a mandocello aficionado.

    Here’s an Instagram link to my image of his concert with his wife here in the pines last year. Apparently he’s had this 1914 Gibson mando since he was a kid.

    Login • Instagram

    I’ll try to dig up the original image on my Big iMac later for folks who don’t do I-gram.

    Re Abercrombie’s tuning tendency, I tune my mandola like a 4-string guitar. No tuning paradigm shift required.
    I am sorry rhl, I was referring to the original video of "Pent Up House." I would love to know the Mandoloin player's name and info on his instrument. I just love the brightness of the guitar (Reg) and the mandolin, as well as the high energy solos. The video just exudes joy. Something I can use more of, these days.

  27. #26

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    Maybe Reg can supply his name.

    Certainly it’s hard to imagine a mandolin not sounding joyous. But it can sound fussy, fidgety, manic...Which reminds me:

    There’s an early TS Eliot poem that includes the couplet

    the pleasant whine

    of a mandoline...

    Nice version of Pent-Up House in any case!

  28. #27

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    Speaking of joyous sounds from a jazz mandolin, here's David Grisman (mandolin) and Martin Taylor (guitar) from the Tone Poems II album in 1995 on "Here's That Rainy Day."

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    I am sorry rhl, I was referring to the original video of "Pent Up House." I would love to know the Mandoloin player's name and info on his instrument. I just love the brightness of the guitar (Reg) and the mandolin, as well as the high energy solos. The video just exudes joy. Something I can use more of, these days.
    It appears to be a guy called Tom Bekeny (I googled Kensington circus pub mandolin and this came up, details are in the YouTube video description):


  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    It appears to be a guy called Tom Bekeny (I googled Kensington circus pub mandolin and this came up, details are in the YouTube video description):

    gb, you are a dangerous man with those sleuthing skills. Remind me not to anger you, and thanks.

    I noticed that pub is in the San Francisco Bay Area, near Berkley, California, where the Musician's Institute can be found. There must be some great music being made around there in the small clubs.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    It appears to be a guy called Tom Bekeny (I googled Kensington circus pub mandolin and this came up, details are in the YouTube video description):
    Ah, success. I found out that Tom is in several groups, including that one with Reg, called "The Missing Man Quartet" (assuming the website is up-to-date). They also go by the name, "MM4."

    I will keep this in mind for future reference, as I sometimes go to that area in my travels. Would be nice to catch a show, if there is any live music left around there after this COVID onslaught.

    Tom Bekeny, Bluegrass, Jazz, Bands

    Again, Thanks!

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan
    gb, you are a dangerous man with those sleuthing skills. Remind me not to anger you, and thanks.

    I noticed that pub is in the San Francisco Bay Area, near Berkley, California, where the Musician's Institute can be found. There must be some great music being made around there in the small clubs.
    no worries, I can’t be bothered to get angry about anything any more, takes too much effort!

  33. #32

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    Besides those mentioned here a few more folks:

    Michael Lampert....has a few albums of jazz mandolin played on electric 4 string. Here is link to some audio:

    http://www.sojournerrecords.net/

    I also always enjoyed the Jazz Mandolin Project led by Jamie Masefield. Perhaps more jam band then jazz. Always loved this song which has a definite Metheny vibe to my ears:


  34. #33

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    One more with the Missing Man Quartet and their Mandolin player, Tom, and our Reg on guitar.