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  1. #1

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I hope that is true, cause mental illness sucks and the current treatments we have suck almost as bad.

    I heard a podcast featuring Michael Pollan and found his argument quite compelling.

    I don't want to go into details, but I have family members with mental health disorders, and I think the only reason some of them are out of the hospital and out of jail is marijuana and possibly the occasional psilocybin experience. It certainly isn't the psychotropic meds that zonked them out and which they won't take willingly.

  4. #3
    re- link to article ,

    some of the readers comment were really very interesting, real life experience and interpretations,

    .............not everyone has the same outcomes,
    Prof. Nutt Uk is a brilliant mind on this, check him out, no BS, just practical professional expertise..

  5. #4

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    Who's dealing?

    Um, could you get me a few tabs of Purple Ousley? I'm feelin' a bit hinky...

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Who's dealing?

    Um, could you get me a few tabs of Purple Ousley? I'm feelin' a bit hinky...
    just saying that..the word "flashback" comes to mind...god ..all the names that were used for "acid"

  7. #6

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    Seriously (couldn't resist the above): W/o telling tales out of school, my family---which, b/c you're smart, you can correctly assume includes me---has been dogged for decades by these conditions. 'Agitated depression' (more so, the 'cures') hastened my father's demise from a massive stroke at only 73. He deserved 10 more years, at least.

    Both parents received a wonderful cocktail of EST, and the primitive early anti-depressants, which led to memory loss, and were only marginally effective as treatments. Dad was in a kind of dream world from over-medication, and after each bout of EST there was less of him left. Hospitals are nightmares, and should be avoided at all costs---unless nothing else works. Mental inpatients have no rights, are often abused---and under the best of circumstances the drugs are a crapshoot---especially the new ones. Or they are effective for a while, then no more. I can understand and commend the bravery of non-psychotic people going off meds and facing the demons down.

    OTOH, pharmaceutical treatment has made functioning with schizophrenia easier for people like Tom Harrell. He says meds really helped, and I've no reason to doubt this. Nor do I recommend anyone with real, debilitating psychoses go off meds. These are serious illnesses, and going off meds can lead to suicides, murder---all kinds of horrible ends. Remember Michael Laudor? He was a brilliant law student, the darling of several press outlets, and a movie-of-the-week candidate b/c of his 'miraculous recovery'. Well, he was doing way better. Until the voices told him to stab his fiancee to death. Don't remember if he was on or off meds---I think on. Very sad story. I believe he pled out, and will be institutionalized for life.

    There are no easy answers, but for depression---even major depression, which is widespread---there are options: A good therapist; constant activity; mindfulness or other meditation techniques---and I have no objection to these in combination with antidepressants/anti-anxiety meds, but short-term.

    A strong support system supersedes all of the above IMO...
    Last edited by joelf; 06-10-2020 at 04:44 PM.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Who's dealing?

    Um, could you get me a few tabs of Purple Ousley? I'm feelin' a bit hinky...
    "microdose" LSD looks promising for anxiety disorders.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Who's dealing?

    Um, could you get me a few tabs of Purple Ousley? I'm feelin' a bit hinky...
    except ousley is saxman king curtis ousley...nothing to do with the deads bear- owsley




    cheers

  10. #9
    A Consultant Psychiatrist told my wife and i that Anti-depressants in 78-85% of cases do not work, they are basically treatment resistant. This does not apply to short term depression, caused by a trigger, death or divorce etc etc.

    He was in favour of using ECT.

  11. #10

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    I've kept coming back to this thread and wondering if I should say something. I've decided to add my own experience.
    In my early twenties I was diagnosed with clinical depression. There was a family history of it including some real tragedy.


    Initially I was prescribed (I think) Paroxetine and later that was replaced by Citalopram. It's difficult to say how they helped, but with hindsight I benefited more by becoming involved in a sport at amateur level and also by throwing myself into my work.


    I built a successful career, met and married a great woman and life was great. A couple of years after the marriage my wife got sick and passed away. She was still a young woman, although I know age is nothing compared to the loss. Anyway, that was the trigger for the biggest low of my life.


    Time passes and loss is learned to live with. I decided to stop taking the Citalopram. That is, I stopped cold and without discussing it with my GP. Horrific. I don't recommend anyone stops that way.


    A few years ago I took early retirement. I immediately felt a weight lifted from my shoulders that I hadn't known was there. It's good no longer having to deal with people in the business (or more exactly, on the outskirts of it) or the assorted BS that comes as part of that.


    Depression is a terrible thing. Not everyone will have the same experience with it. I wouldn't wish it on anyone.


    I've just read all that back and it makes my life seem to be more dark than it is. The truth is, things could always be worse. I no longer feel depressed in the way I did before, but when not feeling 100% I remind myself 'This too shall pass'.