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  1. #1

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    Hello,

    A while ago I stumbled upon a Miles Davis quote where he said something along the lines of "preserve this, preserve that.." and seemingly lamented the traditionalist approach to jazz. For the life of me I can't find it now, and don't remember where I read it. Is anyone familiar with it?

    Thanks.

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  3. #2

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    Miles was pretty much an endless supply of useless personal bullshit. He knew people put a lot of gravity on his opinions, so he liked to yank folk's chains for fun. Best to just make something up, and say he said it.

    Miles Davis Quotes (Author of Miles)

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Miles was pretty much an endless supply of useless personal bullshit. He knew people put a lot of gravity on his opinions, so he liked to yank folk's chains for fun. Best to just make something up, and say he said it.

    Miles Davis Quotes (Author of Miles)
    Thanks for the source. Maybe it is a bias, but I liked most of them. Especially this one:

    “Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent.”

  5. #4

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    Even if you can't find it, this might make up for it :-)

    A Rolling Stone Interview With Miles Davis

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Miles was pretty much an endless supply of useless personal bullshit. ..............”

    Miles Davis Quotes (Author of Miles)

    Are you serious or joking? Couldn’t tell.

    AKA

  7. #6
    Thanks for info! I remembered something he said in the specific quote I read, something along the lines of "if they had their way they'd be cloning us in a lab." It may well have been in a YouTube comment somewhere, and he may well have never said it at all.

  8. #7

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    Miles was a creative musician. Period. If you're looking for philosophy . . . look elsewhere. Good playing . . . Marinero

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Miles was a creative musician. Period. If you're looking for philosophy . . . look elsewhere. Good playing . . . Marinero
    Nope just looking for that specific quote as part of potential school project. Nothing anything deeper than that.

  10. #9

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    I hope you're not chasing your tail over this.

    How methodically have you looked for this yourself? You've got to be a detective. Retrace your steps. How long ago was it? What were you doing at the time? Where were you?

    Did you find it on your mobile or a PC? Where? When? What were you looking for at the time? What were you googling? Why? If you googled it, what did you google? Jazz? Miles Davis? Somebody else? Can you remember how quickly you found it? Was it a link from the first page of results? It'll still be there.

    If you were on a PC it should still be in History. Ask the same questions. Put the question to yourself and sleep on it. You might suddenly remember something in the morning, or at some odd time. The brain's good that way.

    Be a detective. Retrace your steps. Be methodical. If you haven't got time, find time. It won't take long.

    If the worst comes to the worst and you really draw a blank, how much does it matter? One quote? You could always just write 'Miles once said he lamented...' etc and hope no one demands absolute proof! Or you could just leave the whole thing out altogether. It's only a school project, not some life-or-death exam.

    Good luck. When's this project got to be in by? Time's running out...

  11. #10
    I've searched through all my history and can't find anything. It was about a month ago or more. I didn't think much of it at the time.

    I've come to conclusion that it was part of a debate in a YouTube comment section and definitely included "preserve this, preserve that." Seeing as Google isn't turning up anything he was likely misquoted or he never said it at all! The crux was that we should be involving all the time musically. Plenty of other similar sentiments from Miles have been shared above so no worries. Thanks!

  12. #11

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    Well, I did wonder if it was Miles at all. He was known for being very forward-looking, always changing, and all that. Hearing him say 'Let's preserve the old ways' doesn't really connect, if you see what I mean. Could be quite wrong, of course, but it did cross my mind.

    Anyway, good luck with the project, it's not the end of the world. More fish to fry :-)

  13. #12
    Sorry to be more clear we was complaining about people who said "preserve this, preserve that" and said that if people had their way they'd be making clones (or something to that effect) of him and possibly Coltrane. I thought it was quite funny anyway, and interesting.

  14. #13

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    Miles was always saying things like ‘the music needs to move forward, not get stuck in the past’ etc. I imagine there are quite a few quotes by him along those lines.

  15. #14

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    "Wynton Marsalis? I don't know about him, man. But I know he doesn't talk like that when we're alone together. 'Preserve this' and 'preserve that’ — the way they're going we'll have blacks back on the plantation. I mean, it already is preserved. Isn't that what records are all about?

    "I just tell people it's like this: I can't wear bell-bottom pants anymore. And I don't drive an Edsel. I drive a Ferrari."

    Mark Rowland, "Miles Davis is a Living Legend and You're Not,"
    Musician, May 1987, page 90.

    Quoted in:


    Drifting On A Read: Jazz As A Model For Literary And Theoretical Writing
    By James Michael Jarrett
    PhD thesis
    University of Florida
    1988
    Page 59

  16. #15
    Thanks so much! That's the gist of it alright. I'm pretty certain I must have read a misquote somewhere but I can sleep easy now. Thanks!

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch



    if we compare Miles and Dizzy Gillespie, we have something like Picasso and Marc Chagall
    that's a mindbender right there!!...who's picasso?? dizzy is really conventional compared to miles...tho diz is arguably the far better craftsman...if you watch older age dizzy vids..(and i saw him live in his olde days)..he tried to blow more miles modern..and could.....but his heart wasn't in it...he blew clear...miles was the chagall in my book..drifted upside down thru the heavens if need be

    i met john faddis..who was dizs trumpet disciple, at diz show (buddy richs place nyc)...diz was proud... faddis/cat blew loud and clear...just like him...but he/faddis never got the rep that miles and the looser guys got

    nice comparison my friend

    all art is one




    cheers

  18. #17

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    Hate comparing as it's kinda apples oranges, Chagall was really great, but Picasso was on level of Bird imo, genius, and I dont use that term lightly. Agree, exc comparison.
    Faddis kind of a Diz clone ( that ain't really a bad thing)

    Now Vincent, well, that dude really moved me, got to see a couple major shows back in day, still haven't gotten over them, geez

  19. #18

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  20. #19

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    Though Miles was rude often most of what he says always seemed very clearly and directly put thoughts, very understandable.

    I never took him (and I thin alsmot anyone) as an extreme authoritive and never took anything for granted just because it was him - that concerns not only words but music too by the way.

    His
    "Don't play what's there. Play what's not there."

    Is actually very true artistic credo. I could say the same about writers or painters.
    Average writers describe what's already there (maybe tastefulle and scilfully), they often know what and how is going to happen.
    Great writers write to find out what is going to happen next.

    They do not know how it goes.
    Their art leads them to an unknown territory for themselves.


    This credo is a call to be as challaenging artistically as possible, to be true to your art and to yourself.
    And it is put in a very simple and clear form.


    Last edited by Jonah; 01-14-2020 at 10:19 AM.

  21. #20

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    From the 50s and 60s I can take every single note of him authoritive with no doubt.

  22. #21

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    Miles Davis would have been nothing without Dizzy Gillespie , he's pretty explicit about the debt in his autobiog .

    Also , Picarso can do one , absolute emporers new clothes , battened on to the avant-garde to cover his paucity of visual imagination . Not even original but a genius self-publicist .

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    when I did the comparison, Miles-Picasso / Dizzy-Chagall, it was only about changing his style during his life. Miles like Picasso are known to have several "periods". One can consider, in relation to this enormous evolution, that Gillespie plays all his life in much the same way, as Chagall painted in the same way.

    In other words, I think you did not understand. But it doesn't matter, here, 10% understand me. It must be the fault of my bad English
    IMHO, your English is fine.Very much enjoying your posts.

  24. #23

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    Very interesting, but misses the point.

    I think there could be two kind of motivations to became anti confomist. A) is only just to be different, to be an anti mainsteam. This motivation has no particular image, do not want to create anything else just a big NOT. Of course they end up to be similar, the current mainstream's NOT, ironically calculated by the current culture thinking. No need complexity theory to explain this.

    However the B), does not care about others, and the mainstream, does not care anout being similar or opposite, or any, The B) type just want express himself faithfully, reagrdless what others do. He is not a l'art pour l'art anti conformist. All those kind of personality will end up differently as anti conformist, because in reality they are their different selfs.

    Interestingly those type primarily are "conformist", they want to conform to their self, an be with integrity their personality.
    Last edited by Gabor; 01-15-2020 at 12:50 AM.

  25. #24

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    Regarding comparing arts and drawing paralells in different arts like Picasso, Dizzy, Miles etc, the following is unbeatable:

    Mozart is the Beethoven of music!

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    I could extend such parallelism to many examples in music, literature, poetry, painting... I have a fairly good knowledge of their history, and I have been interested in jazz for over 50 years

    there are artists who don't like to do the same thing twice, and as soon as they do, they move on. This is the case with Miles and Picasso. It is an irrepressible, psychological, vital need, not a desire to stand out to be original. Others invent in their youth a new form, which characterizes them, and stick to it all their lives, naturally with evolution, but without essentially coming out of this form

    in painting we can think of Da Vinci, Claude Monet or Matisse, in literature to Victor Hugo, in poetry to Aragon, in music actually to Beethoven, in jazz again Duke Ellington, where it is usual to distinguish periods, Coleman Hawkins, from Fletcher Henderson to Sonny Rollins through his active participation with young boppers and to the bossa-nova vogue, Jimmy Giuffre constantly changing, Coltrane... Others are more stable who establish very young the style that will characterize them all their lives, Sidney Bechet, Count Basie, Johnny Hodges, Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey, John Lewis MJQ...

    we can think of guitarists, but as far as the generation born with the bebop, it was also due to the commercial pressure of rock, the 60s and 70s would have thrown them on the spot, after the success of Blue Note (Grant Green, Kenny Burrell...). Wes is doing better but dies in 1968

    many of the former musicians have an eclipse and return and come back thanks to the door open to revivals by Winton Marsalis, by which young people rush. It is very striking in this forum to see a dominant bebop-revival, evidenced by the topics on chords and improvisation, the interest in teaching Barry Harris decades after he laid the foundations of his style
    Bepop (and many of its followers) rulez,but...I do not want to lower your attraction of bebop revival, but please refer to the age poll of this forum.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    Very interesting, but misses the point.

    I think there could be two kind of motivations to became anti confomist. A) is only just to be different, to be an anti mainsteam. This motivation has no particular image, do not want to create anything else just a big NOT. Of course they end up to be similar, the current mainstream's NOT, ironically calculated by the current culture thinking. No need complexity theory to explain this.

    However the B), does not care about others, and the mainstream, does not care anout being similar or opposite, or any, The B) type just want express himself faithfully, reagrdless what others do. He is not a l'art pour l'art anti conformist. All those kind of personality will end up differently as anti conformist, because in reality they are their different selfs.

    Interestingly those type primarily are "conformist", they want to conform to their self, an be with integrity their personality.

    You forgot:

    C) To get laid

  28. #27

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    Then I partly misunderstood. Agree with the role of tradition. I would add that any valuable new must serve as tradition for the further future, unless it is just a dead end.
    Btw I meant the poll about members age.

  29. #28

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    I suspect the reason there is a focus on bebop on the forum is simply because a lot of us are at various stages of learning to play jazz, or improving what we know, we are not professional players, and bebop is still the ‘core’ approach to learning jazz and improvising over chord changes.

    It’s quite likely that many of us also listen to (and play) other genres of jazz (and other music).

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    Very interesting, but misses the point.

    I think there could be two kind of motivations to became anti confomist. A) is only just to be different, to be an anti mainsteam. This motivation has no particular image, do not want to create anything else just a big NOT. Of course they end up to be similar, the current mainstream's NOT, ironically calculated by the current culture thinking. No need complexity theory to explain this.

    However the B), does not care about others, and the mainstream, does not care anout being similar or opposite, or any, The B) type just want express himself faithfully, reagrdless what others do. He is not a l'art pour l'art anti conformist. All those kind of personality will end up differently as anti conformist, because in reality they are their different selfs.

    Interestingly those type primarily are "conformist", they want to conform to their self, an be with integrity their personality.

    Well, I should have used an ironical emoticon on my post above, tongue-in-cheek - I just don't like reading texts (my own and others') that remind me on mouse cinema. Anyway, what I wanted to demonstrate is

    1. that we all have our, sometimes very limited, own assessment horizon. Complexity theory and mathematical methods are valid, but can only explain some aspects of the complex and often irrational human personality. If you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
    2. that we have to differentiate between the few original hipsters (authentic non-conformists or artists that find new ways almost completely independent of the prevailing opinion, or of their own public image and appreciation), and the mass of wanna-be or fake hipsters (self-explaining). So I think the author of that "hipster-effect" publication could have a point, though he doesn't extend to this.


    One can think of Miles Davis personality and music whatever one likes. Personally, I don't think he was an original hipster, rather a driven personality, depending on public appreciation, or disregard. Possibly he created new styles only because of his technical-musical inadequacies that he suffered from first, and later - when he had overcome his drug addiction - he still showed some characteristic compulsive behavior of an addict, had always to get new kicks (sublimed not only in jazz and fusion), like any drug/game/sex addict has to. Psychologically, it's usually the manifestation of a low level of self-esteem, which, in public, can sometimes increase to the contrary. In that sense, Miles could be called the first popstar of jazz.

    Please, do not misunderstand, I greatly appreciate many of Miles compositions! Nevertheless, I'd prefer a player and composer like Charles Mingus, who mastered his instrument very early on, and who could offer different styles in one single concert rather than just serially over the years. Mingus was an authentic hothead who hated dishonesty, and, like Miles, also complained about the playing skills and the high income of rock musicians, but never opportunistically used stylistic devices or forms of rock.

    For each language - and music is just an extension of language - Schopenhauer's word applies: "Use ordinary words and say unusual things". Viewed in this light Miles, at least after his hardbop years, was more the antithesis.

    If there has been an original jazz hipster in the past 80 years, that honor should be due to Thelonious Monk. Stars like Bird, Dizzy and Miles would hardly be conceivable without Monk's preparatory work and hipster-ness. A second candidate for an original jazz hipster would be Lester Young, though not so much musically seen.
    Last edited by Ol' Fret; 01-15-2020 at 09:19 AM.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pycroft
    Miles Davis would have been nothing without Dizzy Gillespie , he's pretty explicit about the debt in his autobiog .

    Also , Picarso can do one , absolute emporers new clothes , battened on to the avant-garde to cover his paucity of visual imagination . Not even original but a genius self-publicist .
    Hi, Py,
    My exact sentiments. I have always said Picasso was a good technician but not an ARTIST. He was a 50's-60's hipster icon and the reason for his many "periods" was that he closely followed the trends in Art and capitalized on them with his famous name. He never found his voice and, in my opinion, never painted a great painting. The real artist(s) of his period, in my opinion, was Ernst Kirchner--German Expressionist painter as well as Emil Nolde, Max Beckman, George Groz, Oscar Kokaschka. Good playing . . . Marinero

  32. #31

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    Genius isnt it ?Miles Davis quote-image-jpg

  33. #32

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    yeah, a total hack...
    Last edited by wintermoon; 01-15-2020 at 06:22 PM.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pycroft
    Miles Davis would have been nothing without Dizzy Gillespie , he's pretty explicit about the debt in his autobiog .

    Also , Picarso can do one , absolute emporers new clothes , battened on to the avant-garde to cover his paucity of visual imagination . Not even original but a genius self-publicist .
    I'm going to stay away from Picasso...(that's what she said...)

    As I recall from Miles' bio he did indicate his appreciation for Dizzy but was frustrated with Dizzy's "lack of seriousness" and his mugging for audiences--a similar complaint lodged against Louis Armstrong--because it smacked of minstrelsy.

    I think it is true that Dizzy broke the mold with his virtual creation of bebop. Davis started out in bebop but left it ("pure" bebop anyway) for hard bop and then more experimental pursuits.

    Here is an interesting discussion from 1960 comparing Miles to Diz. Ironic that the author says that Miles is unemotional and clearly not as accomplished as Diz.

    Davis and Dizzy | 1960-1969 | Guardian Century

  35. #34

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    Go see Guernica...not in a book. It will blow you away.

  36. #35

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    always reticent to get involved in any debate about the value of any artist...to each his own..but to denigrate picasso!! wow...

    be like kids saying all django music is the same..or all coltrane sux..i hate saxophone!

    sad

    picasso was great artist...worked as a master in many fields...paint. pottery. sculpture, book illustration. etc etc

    and probably one the greatest improvising artists ever

    witness- mystery of picasso-



    as wm & gt mentioned-guernica!! as art and statement on mans inhumanity to man!! immediate and unparalleled

    a true heavyweight

    cheers

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon



    yeah, a total hack...

    No, he just never found himself as an artist. Technician: yes. Creative Artist: No--copyist. Good playing . . . Marinero

  38. #37

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    and to steer this back to diz and miles...dizzy was not as one dimensional as intimated in this thread!..not only was he a founding father of be-bop...(which would be enough right there!)...but he was also one of the first jazzers to incorporate latin and afro-cuban rhythms into jazz...very early on!!

    nor was he a bad electric diz-

    as seen with a young rodney jones on guitar



    and his manner, tho outwardly a bit more homespun than miles. was equally hip...

    some would call it confidence!..with nothing to prove!



    cheers

  39. #38

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    In the Forties, it was Dizzy and Parker who most music historians credit with starting Bebop/Modern Jazz. Miles came along later.
    Good playing . . . Marinero

    Here's a 1945 recording of the duo. Enjoy!

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    and to steer this back to diz and miles...dizzy was not as one dimensional as intimated in this thread!..not only was he a founding father of be-bop...(which would be enough right there!)...but he was also one of the first jazzers to incorporate latin and afro-cuban rhythms into jazz...very early on!!

    nor was he a bad electric diz-

    as seen with a young rodney jones on guitar



    and his manner, tho outwardly a bit more homespun than miles. was equally hip...

    some would call it confidence!..with nothing to prove!



    cheers
    I saw Dizzy in the early 80’s at an Atlanta jazz festival. I saw Miles near Vienna at a festival a couple of years later. They were both in the twilight of their careers, but both entertaining.

    No one can denigrate Dizzy’s contributions to jazz. No doubt he was a better blower than Miles—I agree Miles CAN blow, but I think one reason he went in a different direction was the fact that he knew there were better technical players than him. Fortunately that worked out for the better!

    I do think that Dizzy though exploring different styles did not stray too far from his bebop origins, nor push boundaries too much as times moved into the 60’s, whereas Miles was a constant explorer.

    Hard to believe both these geniuses were alive at the same time as we fortunate humans.

  41. #40

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    I don't want to offend my friend Neotomic . . .but, how about Miles/Picasso. No, that even doesn't work since Miles was one of many innovators in early-Mid Bebop. However, our friend Picasso . . . never an innovator . . . followed the popular trends in Modern Art with great technical skill and laudable business acumen. Isn't it great that everyone doesn't think the same! I'd hate to live in that world! Good playing . . . Marinero

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    I don't want to offend my friend Neotomic . . .but, how about Miles/Picasso. No, that even doesn't work since Miles was one of many innovators in early-Mid Bebop. However, our friend Picasso . . . never an innovator . . . followed the popular trends in Modern Art with great technical skill and laudable business acumen. Isn't it great that everyone doesn't think the same! I'd hate to live in that world! Good playing . . . Marinero
    no offense taken..as i writ ^ "to each his own"...we love our arts thru our own limited perspective...tho always trying to expand our vision at the same time!

    however if you read my above (the ^) post clearly, i thought chagall to be the miles metaphor...less polished yet ethereal, spacious..etc..you supply your own adjectives...chagall floated...as did miles

    all good here

    cheers

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    paradoxically, I agree. I recall once again that I spoke with Miles/Picasso only about changes of style in the work of an artist. And your Miles/Chagall parallel holds the road for me


    as a gift for this topic, two paintings of me. When Miles died, I locked myself in my room for three days, and I did a tryptic, all I have left are these two



    source 'Jazz' mes peintures 1973-1991


    yes..i knew we were approaching from different angles!! i saw yours clearly..but l liked mine!!! floating chagall!..haha

    wonderful work!! très bien

    cheers

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol' Fret
    Well, I should have used an ironical emoticon on my post above, tongue-in-cheek - I just don't like reading texts (my own and others') that remind me on mouse cinema. Anyway, what I wanted to demonstrate is

    1. that we all have our, sometimes very limited, own assessment horizon. Complexity theory and mathematical methods are valid, but can only explain some aspects of the complex and often irrational human personality. If you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
    2. that we have to differentiate between the few original hipsters (authentic non-conformists or artists that find new ways almost completely independent of the prevailing opinion, or of their own public image and appreciation), and the mass of wanna-be or fake hipsters (self-explaining). So I think the author of that "hipster-effect" publication could have a point, though he doesn't extend to this.


    One can think of Miles Davis personality and music whatever one likes. Personally, I don't think he was an original hipster, rather a driven personality, depending on public appreciation, or disregard. Possibly he created new styles only because of his technical-musical inadequacies that he suffered from first, and later - when he had overcome his drug addiction - he still showed some characteristic compulsive behavior of an addict, had always to get new kicks (sublimed not only in jazz and fusion), like any drug/game/sex addict has to. Psychologically, it's usually the manifestation of a low level of self-esteem, which, in public, can sometimes increase to the contrary. In that sense, Miles could be called the first popstar of jazz.

    Please, do not misunderstand, I greatly appreciate many of Miles compositions! Nevertheless, I'd prefer a player and composer like Charles Mingus, who mastered his instrument very early on, and who could offer different styles in one single concert rather than just serially over the years. Mingus was an authentic hothead who hated dishonesty, and, like Miles, also complained about the playing skills and the high income of rock musicians, but never opportunistically used stylistic devices or forms of rock.

    For each language - and music is just an extension of language - Schopenhauer's word applies: "Use ordinary words and say unusual things". Viewed in this light Miles, at least after his hardbop years, was more the antithesis.

    If there has been an original jazz hipster in the past 80 years, that honor should be due to Thelonious Monk. Stars like Bird, Dizzy and Miles would hardly be conceivable without Monk's preparatory work and hipster-ness. A second candidate for an original jazz hipster would be Lester Young, though not so much musically seen.
    Very detailed and clearly explained thoughts. (I think "creating new styles" is overrated. I do not care if Miles created or not, so for me it is not lowers Miles musical contribution if there is a doubt how many times he "renew" jazz. I understand this is not your main point, just related to the topic, so I shared ) His music expression is very unique (hip) even if he plays a standard head and very disciplined according his extreme rule set always. (again 50s 60s, later stuff I may enjoy, but do not get it).

    Interestingly when you quoted Schopenhauer, I thought you will continue Miles as example of that. For me, Miles uses ordinary words, and most of the time say very surprising, exciting, unordinary and hip.

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    no offense taken..as i writ ^ "to each his own"...we love our arts thru our own limited perspective...tho always trying to expand our vision at the same time!

    however if you read my above (the ^) post clearly, i thought chagall to be the miles metaphor...less polished yet ethereal, spacious..etc..you supply your own adjectives...chagall floated...as did miles

    all good here

    cheers
    Hi, N,
    I think Chagall was an originator and his wonderful paintings spoke metaphorically/poetically . . . something Picasso was never able to accomplish. My current wife and last wife are visual artists. And, in many academic Art circles and among practicing visual artists, my original comments about Picasso are quite common. We musicians also have the same distinctions in our "Art," namely, that there is a difference between a technician and an Artist. One can play fast, accurately and say nothing. And, popularity and public acceptance have no relevance to artistry(Herbie Mann,Herb Alpert, etc.). I could bore you with a list of great artists who died in poverty and without public acclaim. But, I would guess, most of us know them. Ergo, the Herd is never right about anything. Good playing . . . Marinero

  46. #45

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    Picasso was the most important artist of the 20th century. As Robert Hughes wrote:
    Moreover, he was the artist with whom virtually every other artist had to reckon, and there was scarcely a 20th century movement that he didn't inspire, contribute to or--in the case of Cubism, which, in one of art history's great collaborations, he co-invented with Georges Braque--beget. The exception, since Picasso never painted an abstract picture in his life, was abstract art; but even there his handprints lay everywhere--one obvious example being his effect on the early work of American Abstract Expressionist painters, Arshile Gorky, Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning, among others.

    Chagall has his charms, but his work is neither as important nor as original.

  47. #46

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    Miles Davis quote-sinatra-jpg

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, N,
    I think Chagall was an originator and his wonderful paintings spoke metaphorically/poetically . . . something Picasso was never able to accomplish. My current wife and last wife are visual artists. And, in many academic Art circles and among practicing visual artists, my original comments about Picasso are quite common. We musicians also have the same distinctions in our "Art," namely, that there is a difference between a technician and an Artist. One can play fast, accurately and say nothing. And, popularity and public acceptance have no relevance to artistry(Herbie Mann,Herb Alpert, etc.). I could bore you with a list of great artists who died in poverty and without public acclaim. But, I would guess, most of us know them. Ergo, the Herd is never right about anything. Good playing . . . Marinero
    My wife and I met in art school, and many of our friends are artists. I believe a great many of us admire Picasso for his art, and also for his uncanny ability to Not Starve to Death. Maybe it's a regional thing.

  49. #48

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    America's favorite artist....


  50. #49

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    When I was in Brighton I was good chums with Mike Tucker who was Professor of Poetics and Jazz Studies at the art college. We promoted a show together once which was popular. He let me sit in on his seminars and always put jazz and fine art together. One of his best seminars had Nana Vasconcelos as a performing guest. He was very keen on Garbarek and put him on more than once.

  51. #50

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    I believe a great many of us admire Picasso for his art, and also for his uncanny ability to Not Starve to Death.
    :-)