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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    paradoxically, I agree. I recall once again that I spoke with Miles/Picasso only about changes of style in the work of an artist. And your Miles/Chagall parallel holds the road for me


    as a gift for this topic, two paintings of me. When Miles died, I locked myself in my room for three days, and I did a tryptic, all I have left are these two



    source 'Jazz' mes peintures 1973-1991



    ?as I explained in the topic "84...", the format is 7 x 12, like other elements in the composition
    I like these.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    So do I.

  4. #53

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    Since we're talking painting now, I thought I might jump in. I did a lot of large abstracts some years ago, burned out on it a bit, but I still love big, non-representational stuff...it's an experience. This one is in my classroom now, my students like it, mostly for the size (about 4 by 6 feet)

    Miles Davis quote-20200117_090345-01-jpg

    These days, I'm working much smaller...I've become fascinated with the architecture of old Catholic churches around Chicago (we have a lot) so I've been photographing and doing some ink/watercolor type stuff.

    Miles Davis quote-fb_img_1577149614365-01-jpg

  5. #54

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    You guys are very talented. I gave up my paintbrushes a long time ago.

  6. #55
    Sorry guys for interrupting the colourful tangent this thread has taken!

    With regards to Miles' quote, could anyone point me in the direction of the any quotes referencing the importance of individuality in jazz? I've found a few but often I can't find the original source of the quote, which I need.

    Pat Metheny has an interesting one:

    "I have to say that the quality of being different has much more value to me than it seems to have for others. When I hear someone who sounds like someone else, I kind of tune out. To me the whole area of individuality and at least attempting to come up with something that is original and not referenced to this or that is very important to me. It is the essence of what the jazz language implies as an responsibility of the artist. Oddly, as time has progressed, this seems to become less and less an issue with players. In fact, there are players that I hear where it seems that the thought of the pursuit of an original sound has never even crossed their mind. It appears to them it is just fine to try to sound like so and so or to try to play basically in the style of this or that general approach. To me and my aesthetic, my way of thinking about it, this is not cool, in fact, it is kind of an error. It is like playing bad notes, but bad notes on the aesthetic level."

  7. #56

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    Jean-Michel Basquiat's- Trumpet




    cheers

  8. #57

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    vian w miles...

    “Every breath into my trumpet steals from my life”



    cheers

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Miles was pretty much an endless supply of useless personal bullshit. He knew people put a lot of gravity on his opinions, so he liked to yank folk's chains for fun. Best to just make something up, and say he said it.

    Miles Davis Quotes (Author of Miles)
    Ha! The man did seem to have something bordering on genius at manipulating his image. He knew the reactions he'd get to certain kinds of statements, and went there willingly---sometimes gleefully.

    I do like much of what he has said about music. It was well-put, food for thought, and sometimes made me double-check my own perceived insights. That can help one grow. But then he'd contradict himself, sometimes in the same conversation!

    I know it's a near-cliche, but the music still speaks the loudest. I put way more weight on that...

  10. #59

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    Thanks for posting Miles in '69. Very interesting to me. I saw him in the summer of 70 or possibly 71 at Shelley's Manhole (i think) in LA. I know for sure it was Jarret, DeJohnette, Airto and an electric bass player who I'm unsure of. The set started with DeJohnette drum solo, then Airto came on, bass joined, then Jarret and finally Miles. One long jam for the set. Seems to me it was a lot like the clip. Miles did look at the audience. I thought I saw laser beams shooting out of his eyes. I was sitting close and he kinda scared this small town Canadian white boy. He sure had a presence.

    I remember how Airto just had all his stuff on a rug on the floor. Before the days of percussion tables and racks and so on. Before anybody knew what a Brazilian percussionist was.

    They completely blew my little mind. Just wanted to share. It's a seminal moment in my life.

  11. #60

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  12. #61

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    in painting we can think of Da Vinci, Claude Monet or Matisse, in literature to Victor Hugo, in poetry to Aragon, in music actually to Beethoven, in jazz again Duke Ellington, where it is usual to distinguish periods, Coleman Hawkins, from Fletcher Henderson to Sonny Rollins through his active participation with young boppers and to the bossa-nova vogue, Jimmy Giuffre constantly changing, Coltrane... Others are more stable who establish very young the style that will characterize them all their lives, Sidney Bechet, Count Basie, Johnny Hodges, Thelonious Monk, Art Blakey, John Lewis MJQ...
    Hm.. I would not say that Monet and Coltrane were essentially changing.. of course if you look at the early Monet and his last paintings the difference may seem striking... but essentially they just developed the same thing all the time... they just got deeper and deeper into it...
    The same concerns Beethoven for sure for me...

    But artists like Trane and Monet could be the symbols of stubborn dedication to the single aesthetic idea for me...



    Chagall - mentioned somewhere above - is exceptional, I do not know any other like that in 20th century .... there was a short period of searches and then for decades he found that harmonious feel that he did not need to prove anything to anyone... full of humanity, wisdom, love, memory, passion.