Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    The videos of the u-bass make it seem like it's not a novelty, but rather, a real bass that would be useful in a group.

    Opinions?

    (I've wanted to play bass, but my arthritic hands aren't up to playing the usual choices).

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I have a friend who gigs with them regularly, not jazz though. He has a uke body and a small solidbody. The bottom end is impressive. The small scale can make it challenging to navigate, but there are pros that are using them. The real breakthrough that made them viable was the new string technology.

    I almost got one years ago, but already have a Precision bass clone and didn't want to get sucked further down the bass rabbit hole, it is addicting and makes you consider ditching guitar and switching fulltime....beware.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    The videos of the u-bass make it seem like it's not a novelty, but rather, a real bass that would be useful in a group.

    Opinions?

    (I've wanted to play bass, but my arthritic hands aren't up to playing the usual choices).
    I attended a workshop a few years ago with a name player who was asked about the practical difficulties involved with touring with a double bass, he was on the European festival circuit for the summer & had arrived at this particular festival the previous day & been given 4 basses from the local music school to choose from, one of which had a nasty split taped over with gaffer tape.

    I played a tape of me playing a Kala Ubass specifically saying I wasn't looking for a free lesson & whilst comments / advice about my time feel, note choices etc would be welcome I was a guitar player & what I was really asking about was the sound I was getting.

    He offered some helpful advice, said he could tell I was a guitar player ('they always play too much'), said less is more, feel the time, you don't always have to play every chord, delay or anticipate the changes more, see what happens when you don't play a chord tone, listen to the other players more....he didn't mention the sound so I asked again, I wasn't trying to be a smart arse, just get a pro's honest reaction - he said it was hard to tell from a mobile phone in a lecture theatre but I was in tune & sound was a personal thing anyway - I sounded fine, he'd played gigs with a worse sound than that, It was really up to me, what did I think of the sound, what did my band mates say ?

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    The videos of the u-bass make it seem like it's not a novelty, but rather, a real bass that would be useful in a group.

    Opinions?

    (I've wanted to play bass, but my arthritic hands aren't up to playing the usual choices).
    A bass player brought a fretless one to the jam I attend. The sound was pretty good, but it seems very difficult to intonate cleanly (this guy is a very good upright player, so that wasn't the issue). I'm somewhat tempted to get one. I have a beat-to-hell Silvertone/Danelectro short scale, but even that feels unwieldy, and takes up a lot space in our small apt, and a (fretted) u-bass would solve a lot of problems.

    John

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I thought about it, since I wanted a bass and I've been playing Tenor Uke for a couple of years now.
    In the end I got a Fender Mustang PJ Bass (30" scale), and I'm very happy with it.
    Ibanez has a short-scale bass called a Mikro that's not much bigger than a Strat with a 28.6" scale:
    Under $200 and supposed to be quite decent, but I've never tried one.
    "Thanks, but you should have heard what I was trying to play!" - T. Monk
    http://network.online.berklee.edu/profile/1200078

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    I've talked to a lot of bassists about these ukulele basses, and the concensus was that they sounded more like an upright than a Fender bass. Usually more welcome at a bluegrass jam, too.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    the silicon/rubber strings can be a bit tough to adjust too..they are very "rubbery"! haha...and intonation can be tricky..but there are metal plated strings available now as well...that would probably serve a guitarist using one better

    here's some kala string options-

    U•BASS(R) Strings – Kala Brand Music Co.

    cheers

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I was spectator at a jazz gig where a fella was playing one - sounded very good and more like an upright than an electric.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Everything you were afraid to ask Kala U-Bass Review - Ultimate Buying Guide (2019) - Idogo Music

    This site has some other interesting bass related pages
    Perfection is in the Details, but Perfection isn't a Detail (Leonardo da Vinci)

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    the silicon/rubber strings can be a bit tough to adjust too..they are very "rubbery"! haha...and intonation can be tricky..but there are metal plated strings available now as well...that would probably serve a guitarist using one better

    here's some kala string options-

    U•BASS(R) Strings – Kala Brand Music Co.

    cheers
    The uke basses never used silicone strings like those old Dearmond Ashbory basses from 20+ years ago. Those were tough to use, tune, etc., needed to use cornstarch or baby powder, very quirky.

    When the ubass was developed and introduced by Kala, they had developed a polyurethane based string technology that overcame all the downside of the silicone strings and was key to making a viable instrument. They are not rubbery at all. The metal wound strings are over the new string material, so it's really just another flavor.