Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Posts 1 to 50 of 69
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    White belt
    My Youtube

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    Spend some time listening and learning from other musicians. Learning their music, solos, voicings, whatever.

    Nothing takes me out of myself better. End of the day, might never be the player I want to be, but I’m one step closer to the music I love...

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    I remind myself that I play guitar better than BILLIONS of people.

    I mean sure, most of them don't play the guitar, but I'm still better
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I remind myself that I play guitar better than BILLIONS of people.

    I mean sure, most of them don't play the guitar, but I'm still better
    haha i love this
    White belt
    My Youtube

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    I switch gears to writing songs.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    You stop.

    'Guy goes to a doctor----"it hurts when I go like that".

    "So don't go like that"'.

    Just that simple. Choices, my friend...

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    I try to be aware that extreme reactions (in either direction) are just that, and I'm neither as bad as I think I am (or as good, in those rare moments when I'm pleased). Then I try to understand why what actually sounds bad does sound bad and fix that. I have always felt that the standard I should hold myself to is what professional artists achieve, and I have never lived up to that standard. At times, it's frustrating and depressing, but sometimes there's a glimmer of hope that makes it worthwhile.

    John

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    "Getting down on yourself" is one of the most unproductive, unhelpful ways of "comparing" that one can do!! If people are doing that (and yeah, I know some are), they would be better off working on mindfulness strategies, and being less-judgey of themselves. It's one thing to self-critique after a gig or listening to a recording of yourself -- "Hmm, my time was pretty off there - I'm going to work on that tomorrow!" but it's another thing to be "down" on it, which would sound like, "Man, I suck! I'm never gonna be as good as Kurt, and therefore I'm a worthless human being! I may as well take up ____!" etc.

    I have the fortune of playing at a local jam with a trumpet-playing music professor, and he slays the whole band!! Soulful, lyrical, humorous, great time, great lines -- he's incredible, and miles above the rest of us! My immediate reaction to him on the bandstand is usually laughter -- it's so damn fun to hear him play!! Later, my reaction is, "Wow, that was great! I wonder what he was doing over that progression?? Time to practice!!"

    Breathe ....

    [Edit: Forgot to ad -- the professor is one of the most gracious guys out there, too! Always encouraging and positive, and pushing all of us to play our best!]
    Last edited by marcwhy; 11-12-2019 at 10:02 PM.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    What puts it in perspective is that often the players we look up to are frequently deeply unhappy with their own playing... be it a bad gig or something more long term, I don’t think there’s a point where you are magically happy with what you do.

    Unless you really are shit of course in which case you will spend the rest of your days in ignorant bliss and never improve....

    Actually I have developed more acceptance of how things go at gigs while being a hardass when practicing which I think is a good or at least healthy combo...

    I no longer record myself on gigs, but I work always with recordings in practice sessions and rehearsal. I feel this has allowed me to let go a bit more and take risks in live performance, while hopefully also putting my playing under the microscope where it’s appropriate.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    I remind myself that I play guitar better than BILLIONS of people.

    I mean sure, most of them don't play the guitar, but I'm still better
    Me to.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    We're all players at different levels.

    There's a saying around here, "one of those guys" referring to musical geniuses.

    Most of us aren't one of them.

    We're all climbing the same mountain. You can look up or you can look down.

    I remind myself that, if I can handle the blows to my self-esteem, I can get better, faster.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    It's easy to fall into that trap. For me, I don't compare as there's no point in it as someone else is always better at something than one's self. Just look at the very top players, however you define them; they all have strengths and weaknesses. They're not sitting around comparing themselves to others, rather they appreciate what others do but focus on their own playing and vision. One can't do everything; there's no one who does.

    I look at my progress: what I can do today that I couldn't do yesterday. It all adds up over time and keeps me motivated, and someday....

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    comparing yourself-average-day-jpg

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    I never compare, period. I am where I am. If they're better then I learn. If they're not so good, so be it. We're all somewhere on the scale.

    If you compare yourself with others,
    you may become vain and bitter;
    for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

    Desiderata.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    How do you deal with getting down on yourself about your playing?
    I never have problem with playing actually... I know I can do almost anything if I want to...

    My problems are with myself as a personality...

    In other words: the reason that I am not satisfied with my playing lies in my personal attitude... I know it very well.

    You can't deal with such things easily... bourbon can (or scotch) ...

    (as Faulkner would say: between nothing and scotch.. I choose scotch)



  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Jonah,

    Thank you for the Faulkner quote.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    As sappy as it sounds: if you can play for a few hours, forget everything else, and feel good when you're done, what more is there? Getting better with practice, and picking up tricks here and there will come with time.

  19. #18
    Thanks everyone.

    After doing some thinking, it seems if I focus on my strengths (and what I ultimately want to do), there's a lot of extra stuff I can drop (stuff I practiced because I "should," but really wouldn't help with what I want to do).

    For instance I can't improvise single note solos too well, and I was getting down on myself about that. My strength is solo guitar arranging and that's what I want to do anyway. Somehow I got the idea that good players are good at everything, but that's not necessarily true.
    White belt
    My Youtube

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    I don't think there is a single area of musicianship one can't master with enough work. Spotting weaknesses is the first step on getting rid of them, it means your ears and musical perception are getting better. The playing will follow!

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    I really appreciate this thread, thx, and also thx for the useful thoughts.

    My method is pretty much standard: never comparing myself to the greats, instead comparing myself to my one month, half year etc previous self, which most of the time gives good feeling and also motivates to go forward.

    This is pretty much solves the self doubt thing.

    Unfortunately this is only half of the story. My practical problem is that I am way experienced listener than player so sometimes I literally suffering hearing what I am producing under the label “music”. Playing to friends and having their honest or dishonest appreciation can ease the symptoms though (for a few hours)

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor View Post
    Playing to friends and having their honest or dishonest appreciation can ease the symptoms though (for a few hours)
    so true. I brought this up to my teacher last night and he gave me one little compliment and I had the best practice session I've had in months
    White belt
    My Youtube

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter View Post
    I don't think there is a single area of musicianship one can't master with enough work. Spotting weaknesses is the first step on getting rid of them, it means your ears and musical perception are getting better. The playing will follow!

    That's what I do not like... not that I think it is worng for everyone of course... but just not for me

    I do not believe in work, hard work, toil, goals, plans, schedules, methods.....

    Since I was a kid I was told that it was good and that I had that type of mind that can systemize all very well.. it took me years to get liberated from it and to understand that I am extremely impulsive and chaotic person (which does not exclude sharp mind maybe)))...

    If one wants to become an average 'something' there is always way for it in society... but the thig is art is not biology, banking, basball, not even air piloting or mountain - climbing... you probably might need sone gift for any area but in those that mentioned there is really a way when you you can become a solid and relatively succesful specialist if you apply some work and descipline and character and so on.

    But not in arts... people might argue: but how is that? There are hundrends of decent pros in music who achieved it with work and etc.

    Ok. But do you want to be a decent pro? Or you want to be a musician?
    Every really good pro I know is essentially an amateur who plays the best stuff in a way as if he is just sitting bedroom.

    It just happened that they become pros...

    Besides accomplished players usually avoid to do what they can't do (and know what they can).

    Really interesting musicians musically are almost never versatile pros. They can do only the things they do.

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah View Post
    That's what I do not like... not that I think it is worng for everyone of course... but just not for me

    I do not believe in work, hard work, toil, goals, plans, schedules, methods.....

    Since I was a kid I was told that it was good and that I had that type of mind that can systemize all very well.. it took me years to get liberated from it and to understand that I am extremely impulsive and chaotic person (which does not exclude sharp mind maybe)))...

    If one wants to become an average 'something' there is always way for it in society... but the thig is art is not biology, banking, basball, not even air piloting or mountain - climbing... you probably might need sone gift for any area but in those that mentioned there is really a way when you you can become a solid and relatively succesful specialist if you apply some work and descipline and character and so on.

    But not in arts... people might argue: but how is that? There are hundrends of decent pros in music who achieved it with work and etc.

    Ok. But do you want to be a decent pro? Or you want to be a musician?
    Every really good pro I know is essentially an amateur who plays the best stuff in a way as if he is just sitting bedroom.

    It just happened that they become pros...

    Besides accomplished players usually avoid to do what they can't do (and know what they can).

    Really interesting musicians musically are almost never versatile pros. They can do only the things they do.
    This is more eloquent way of saying what I was trying to above. I'm not a pro, I don't need to be able to "cover." I have the luxury of playing what I want-- BUT, it will take a life time of work to get where I want to be (basically improvising solo guitar)
    White belt
    My Youtube

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Every single day, in my rational mind I think that for the 50+ years of study I have invested in the guitar I should be better at it than I am.

    And yet, every single day I pick it up and practice some more.

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Thanks everyone.

    After doing some thinking, it seems if I focus on my strengths (and what I ultimately want to do), there's a lot of extra stuff I can drop (stuff I practiced because I "should," but really wouldn't help with what I want to do).

    For instance I can't improvise single note solos too well, and I was getting down on myself about that. My strength is solo guitar arranging and that's what I want to do anyway. Somehow I got the idea that good players are good at everything, but that's not necessarily true.
    This is me. I'm actually way better at the things I've really worked on.

    From my own experience playing music outside of jazz , I can only assume that I'm gonna suck at improv until I start playing with other people. I've got my kids all moved out of the house in the next few weeks for the first time ever. So, maybe I'll actually make the two-hour-round-trip commute to play jazz with someone else before too long. Living in a jazz wasteland is kind of depressing on one level, but honestly, all of the time I have "wasted on jazz" has made all of my other music gigs and day jobs much better.

    For all of my love-hate relationship with jazz and dealings with self-doubt over my playing, I'm a much better musician overall than I was before I started with it. It really does spill over into everything else, from the least jazzy styles of music I play, and even over into things like teaching choral music.

    Are you playing jazz with other people? Maybe we need to start that challenge/motivation thread for the new year. I know I need out. Ha!

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Emily Remler had good advice on this topic ...
    basically just don't cp yourself to others ....

    There's nothing in it ....

  28. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Are you playing jazz with other people? Maybe we need to start that challenge/motivation thread for the new year. I know I need out. Ha!
    I would have to travel a similar distance.I don't see it happening to be honest. I have played with a few people and I don't find it enjoyable for the most part. It might be worth it if my focus changed though.
    White belt
    My Youtube

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    You have to find the right people, too. Butting heads with a good person who just doesn't gel with you musically is not worth it.

    I have a small group of people who play different instruments (2 guitar players, a bassist, and a trombone player-- all of whom I've incidentally never actually tried to get together at the same time (maybe I should?) who I get a chance to play with every now and then, that's really great for my soul.

    I've found I like duos and trios the best. Small musical conversations, much as I enjoy smaller group conversations in real life.

    But yes, there's a satisfaction in playing solo for me, too, though I almost hesitate to call it jazz, even though I'm improvising.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    I came here to say something similar. I have found it very helpful to go on youtube and watch other guitarists at all different levels pursuing their craft and reminding myself it is all part of the process. I have found that when I exclusively watch/listen to those who are the .001% of guitar players out there (J. Lage, Grasso, Kreisberg, to name a few) it is much easier to feel like I will never reach anything remotely close. It's good to remember its about my own journey.


    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    We're all players at different levels.

    There's a saying around here, "one of those guys" referring to musical geniuses.

    Most of us aren't one of them.

    We're all climbing the same mountain. You can look up or you can look down.

    I remind myself that, if I can handle the blows to my self-esteem, I can get better, faster.

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Don't have goals. What? Really. I don't have goals. I have projects. Very, very occasionally those projects are really big things, like Make An Album. Most often they are really small things, like Play C Major Scale Beautifully, or Wind Up Christian On The Forum Today (I don't do that...much). The thing is about projects is that you set ones that are achievable, have a time frame, and a potential sense of achievement, no matter how small.

    Sometimes putting the guitar away and going for a walk is the best thing. I do that a lot. I've discovered that the thing I was looking for in the guitar, I can find elsewhere, be it the light falling on that maple tree, the moon reflected in that puddle, talking to the old lady walking her old dog, etc. Replace long-term goals with short-term projects, and you might find you enjoy life more.

    But then again you might not... c'est la vie!

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    I have a small child and a wife who needs special care. I live far from anyone who plays, listens to, or feels anything but contempt for jazz. I have a day job (or two). Not surprisingly, I rarely play in an ensemble and have little call to improvise solo lines —especially in a jazz context!

    Just like you, I regardless feel this obligation to learn how to improvise bebop lines. Also like you, I’m pretty sure I am terrible at it. The few times a year I get a chance to play with others I am always humiliated.

    What I prefer is solo guitar. I like arranging. I also play some classical guitar. But for some reason I can’t let myself be OK with that. Weirdly, I feel like I’m cheating if I arrange a tune and play it the same way every time. It’s not “Jazz” if I’m not improvising every performance, even if it brings me satisfaction and audiences seem OK with it.

    Does that seem stupid? It does to me. Maybe we need a support group ;-)



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    Not only are there better musicians than me, there are many who are thinner and richer as well!

    It gives me goals.

  34. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post
    I have a small child and a wife who needs special care. I live far from anyone who plays, listens to, or feels anything but contempt for jazz. I have a day job (or two). Not surprisingly, I rarely play in an ensemble and have little call to improvise solo lines —especially in a jazz context!

    Just like you, I regardless feel this obligation to learn how to improvise bebop lines. Also like you, I’m pretty sure I am terrible at it. The few times a year I get a chance to play with others I am always humiliated.

    What I prefer is solo guitar. I like arranging. I also play some classical guitar. But for some reason I can’t let myself be OK with that. Weirdly, I feel like I’m cheating if I arrange a tune and play it the same way every time. It’s not “Jazz” if I’m not improvising every performance, even if it brings me satisfaction and audiences seem OK with it.

    Does that seem stupid? It does to me. Maybe we need a support group ;-)



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I may be in the minority here, but I think arranged songs can still be jazz. Improv is arranging, and at times composing, in real time. Every tune I arrange I get faster at it. I'm starting to feel after a while I could do it on the fly if I stay on this track. I may not be able to if I fuck around trying to sound like a horn player for most of my practice
    White belt
    My Youtube

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Don't have goals. What? Really. I don't have goals. I have projects. Very, very occasionally those projects are really big things, like Make An Album. Most often they are really small things, like Play C Major Scale Beautifully, or Wind Up Christian On The Forum Today (I don't do that...much). The thing is about projects is that you set ones that are achievable, have a time frame, and a potential sense of achievement, no matter how small.

    Sometimes putting the guitar away and going for a walk is the best thing. I do that a lot. I've discovered that the thing I was looking for in the guitar, I can find elsewhere, be it the light falling on that maple tree, the moon reflected in that puddle, talking to the old lady walking her old dog, etc. Replace long-term goals with short-term projects, and you might find you enjoy life more.

    But then again you might not... c'est la vie!
    Conversely--have different types of goals.

    I'll set goals for a day, a week, a year. And because there's nothing riding on them other than my personal satisfaction, the time frame isn't THAT important. My goals are there more to serve as a guide if I should ever start thinking for a second that I'm "bored."
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    That's the reason why I stopped learning jazz guitar a few years ago. I'd watch other guys playing and realise I would have to live two or three times to be as good.
    Now I'm finding joy again in playing jazz and just worried about being a little bit better everyday and not be as good as someone. Above all, to have fun in the process!

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post

    What I prefer is solo guitar. I like arranging. I also play some classical guitar. But for some reason I can’t let myself be OK with that. Weirdly, I feel like I’m cheating if I arrange a tune and play it the same way every time. It’s not “Jazz” if I’m not improvising every performance, even if it brings me satisfaction and audiences seem OK with it.

    Does that seem stupid? It does to me. Maybe we need a support group ;-)



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    I feel you completely.

    The big thing for me is to never get "cutesy" with arranging. I try to sit down with a lead sheet and play a tune right off that, chords and melody. I don't use the term chord melody because it seems to mean "arranging" in my brain, and I don't want to do that.

    Certainly, there are parts of what I do that are arranged, if only because if you play a song a thousand times, there's gonna be things you find that flat out work and stick. But I always try to allow for space in my playing, so things can be improvised. That makes it more enjoyable for me, personally.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    Three things seem to help me.
    One is playing everyday. This started years ago and it gradually became the thing most worthy of note: did I show up? (Did I actually play today?) If so, great. If not, well, play tomorrow. I play every day. Even if I feel like sh*t I pick up the guitar and do something. I have to be bed-ridden to miss a day. Some days are poor----restless sleep, appointments, distractions, low energy---but I show up and do what I can. That's all I can ask of myself. And doing it has become a habit. On bad days, I say what Scarlett O'Hara used to say, "Tomorrow is another day."

    This goes to something Mother Teresa used to say: "God has not called me to be successful; he has called me to be faithful." For me, faithful is showing up.

    (This may be the first time in history that Scarlett O'Hara and Mother Teresa have combined to make a point.)

    Two, always be working on someting. Lately I've wanted to play the head of Stevie Ray Vaughan's "Scuttle Buttin'". It would be easy enough but for the speed. And the slides and the bends...So I have to take it so slow it doesn't sound like that same song. Well, so what? What else have I got to do? If it takes me another month to get it up to tempo, that's okay. If it takes two, well, I expect to be around another two months, so that's really not a problem.

    Three, play some effing tunes! I don't know why it is that so many guitar players can practice and practice and practive but not know how to play any tunes end to end. So I make sure I play some tune end to end every day. (Lately it's "Stompin' At The Savoy.")

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  39. #38
    Jeff, what do you mean by cutesy? overly complex?
    White belt
    My Youtube

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Jeff, what do you mean by cutesy? overly complex?
    Yeah, like putting in everything I know how to do for the sake of showing off what I can do. Filling up space.

    For example, I'll try to avoid using too much walking bass on the head. If I want to improvise something like that later on, cool, but it's like starting with the amp on "10" to me...and where can you go from there? But I actively try not to show my whole hand during the melody.

    I also try to "play to drums in my head," so I'm not actively beating the rhythm over the listener's head. It's just what I like though, doesn't mean that's bad. I like to play "in time" but not "play time" if that makes sense?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  41. #40
    Guilty. However, I do know how to play with taste and can play simple block chord stuff off a lead sheet. I cram stuff in there as a sort of training ground to find what sounds like me, and what moves keep recurring over and over. I'll back it off later.

    If I was going to play a gig next week I would play 100 x simpler
    White belt
    My Youtube

  42. #41
    I rely on my negative self-image to drive me to improve my playing. Like Capt James T. Kirk says: "I need my pain."
    (Yes, i am in therapy.)

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    have played with a few people and I don't find it enjoyable for the most part. It might be worth it if my focus changed though.
    it's interesting. I live in one of the jazziest cities in Europe today. If not political bs it would be a real international jazz scene: lots of venues, high level of players, many young players.


    But it does not make it easier to find someone to play with. At least for my purposes.


    What I want is quiet set once in a week or two in duo with anyone, you know that littke alchemy of communication...


    But thise who can play either want money or business connections...those who are ready to play for fun are mostly too much below my level and it turns into some kind of lesson...


    I played duos with good guitarists and it was real communication I loved it but it was occasional...


    Also big city = complex logistics...(((


    Another thing I thought of: I tried to take lessons a few times and I stopped.. it's all ended like they told me: you know and can everything.. yiu do not need lessons... you need playing


    Like when I learnt Italian myseld I took lessons from native speaker after it to improve my grammar.. and after 2 lessons he said... dont waste your money ... you know the stuff... now you only need to talk.. find a speaking group and just talk
    Just talk
    Last edited by Jonah; 11-13-2019 at 02:58 PM.

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    The only player I need to play better than is myself a month ago.

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    I used to be worse. Practice works. It's OK to cut yourself some occasional slack, just don't abuse the privilege.
    Best regards, k

  46. #45

    User Info Menu

    When I realize it's about finding a niche, I stopped worrying about comparing. There's tons of guitarists, world class in NYC, jazz or anything, I'd go crazy worrying about my level compare to them. I managed to get by doing just music for a few years, and that's all that matter.

    What's more important, I hear from my people who I played with and who continue to gig with other guitarists that I'm missed. The guys subbing for me are very good, schooled jazz musician, but they can't bring that feel that my friends liked. I'd like to think that I found some niche, however small it is.

    Unfortunately looks like I won't be able to come back to the scene for quite a while, so I can't even enjoy it haha.

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    I suspect the answer to the question depends on what path you see yourself walking. I am an amateur , a beginner amateur, a passionate beginner amateur , a passionate beginner amateur who derives a incomprehensible joy from being able to see a path in front of me that seems to promise a visceral engagement with the music I love - blues/jazz!!!! through an object whose presence and substance I get yet another incomprehensible joy- my guitar!!!! What is not to like!!

    I have the same experience when fly fishing with my bamboo rods and hand tied fly patterns or woodworking with my vintage hand planes and chisels and hand saws . Often I don't care if I catch a fish or make a woodworking project because for me the real essence and wellspring of satisfaction is also found in for example learning the entomology that makes the fly tying patterns have relevance and/or learning the chisel or plane bevel angles that work best across different wood grain types or learning scales and arpeggios and harmonic structures. Somewhere along the way I will catch a fish/make a dovetail or improvise on a jazz blues in all cases I will thoroughly enjoying the experience of the journey!!!!!

    To be horribly cliched it really is about the journey for me unencumbered by a definite or externally defined goal. I suspect being an amateur allows a freedom that someone on a path to a professional goal simply can't afford or indulge ?

    The time I have on any given day exploring my relationship with the music I love expressed in my own amateur way on my guitar makes me feel alive!! I'm not sure what I can compare that with ? )))))

    Will

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    "I have the same experience when fly fishing with my bamboo rods and hand tied fly patterns"

    I really miss fly fishing, took it up as a kid.
    When I was only gigging a few times a month I still always had time for it but now not so much as I've been working a lot more.
    It's kind of funny, I used to try to get my little brother to come w/ me and he always said no.
    Then when he went to he Cornell he called and said I'm bored, send me a fly rod.
    Fast forward and now he's a world class fly/spey fisherman and writes articles for magazines etc and I'm the one w/ the rods and tying materials collecting dust.

    sorry, back on topic...


  49. #48

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Unfortunately looks like I won't be able to come back to the scene for quite a while, so I can't even enjoy it haha.
    What happened Hep? Were you banished from NY for dissing Kurt or something?

  50. #49

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    What happened Hep? Were you banished from NY for dissing Kurt or something?
    Hahaha. That's great. I admit my love for Kurt's standards playing + compositions, even though Rosenwinkel seems to be kind of a dirty word around here.

    Back on topic:

    It's very hard not to compare yourself. It's basically taken mental training / persistence in trying to find the right attitude, and that comes with practice. I know in my head that it's destructive / silly to compare, but I still do it anyway from time to time. "Hey, why'd they hire THAT guy this time instead of me? Oh wow...his playing is so smooth and melodic, he's got that X factor that I'll never have etc.". It's degrading to your mental health, and has borderline sent me into depression for short periods. While this is bad, sometimes it takes negative experiences to turn your attitude around and form some resilience.

    Daily reminders:
    - I get joy picking up the guitar and discovering new things, and try to appreciate every new piece of info/vocab/insight, no matter how small. A brick every day will eventually make a house (I hope)
    - I don't need to be world class.
    - There's no rush. If this is an enriching experience to my life, it's worth it no matter how you measure success
    - Accepting that there'll never be a point where I won't feel inadequacy in comparison, while also being content with my current level but not complacent

    I have a few other things I tell myself to keep things straight, but I of course still fail at keeping a good attitude and occasionally go into "this doesn't matter / I'm done music" mode, but things get a little bit better every time I come back to it

  51. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by MarketTomato View Post
    occasionally go into "this doesn't matter / I'm done music" mode,
    yeah that's where I am now (sort of, but I'm coming out of it)
    White belt
    My Youtube