1. #1

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    Listened to this yesterday and today. I have not heard it in its entirety in at least 30 years, maybe longer.

    The lineup for this 3rd album was kind of a one-off, as Greg Lake and most of the original group had left, though some contributed to this album as guest artists.

    It is a very unusual and transitional album--it's very Crimsonesque, yet quite a step beyond the fairly monochromatic Crimson and Poseidon albums. In other words, there's a real subtlety and complexity here, as well as quite a lot of jazz influences. I think it must have been very influential on Genesis and Yes, among others, and actually some of the latter's songs seem imitative of the earlier Crimson work.

    I hesitate to call it jazz, though it's got some contemporary jazz musicians (Keith Tippett on keys), brass and reeds, and has a lot of chord changes and a rather free-form structure that wouldn't be out of place on some free jazz stuff from the time.

    It's not one of the Crimson's most popular albums, probably because it's so dense and challenging to access. Fripp apparently thought it was terrible, until he listened to a recent remastering, and said he could finally hear the music he thought he was making.

    Anyway, give it a listen.

    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 07-19-2019 at 05:27 PM.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    BTW that YouTube recording I think is from someone's vinyl and sounds rather reverby. Check out a direct recording if you're interested.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  4. #3

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    fripp was working with the young giants of the uk free jazz scene at that time...keith tippett, nick evans,marc charig,harry miller, etc..he was even producing tippetts stuff...

    tho even jazzier than lizards was their next lp- islands...

    i still listen to all pre belew crimson regularly..great stuff

    cheers

  5. #4
    I saw King Crimson perform live at the Alexandria (Virginia) Roller Rink in March 1972, and had been listening to them heavily by that time, starting with In the Court of the Crimson King through In the Wake of Poseidon, Lizard and Islands.

    It isn't jazz, but it's still great music.

  6. #5
    Here's a cut from another prog album I was listening to in 1972-73:


  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbernstein91 View Post
    Here's a cut from another prog album I was listening to in 1972-73:

    yeah man..with the great jukka tolonen..early fusionist

    King Crimson's Lizard--it is jazz?-hqdefault-jpg

    cheers

  8. #7

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    I wouldn't say it was jazz. Fusion - or sophisticated rock, maybe.

    Actually I'm not sure it knows what it is :-)

    But I quite enjoyed it.

  9. #8

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    not jazz either..but nevertheless some great fripp

    on an eno bed of looped simplicity..fripp soars



    his sustain is almost flute like....majestic

    cheers

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    not jazz either..but nevertheless some great fripp

    on an eno bed of looped simplicity..fripp soars



    his sustain is almost flute like....majestic

    cheers
    That was my intro into ambient music and more specifically Brian Eno and Robert Fripp's non-Crimson work. Back around '79-80, a friend knew I liked weird stuff like Bowie and Zappa, and mentioned that I might like Eno. He suggested Here Come the Warm Jets. At the record store--Wuxtry in Atlanta--they didn't have HCTWJ that day, but they did have Evening Star.

    So I took it home, and, with much anticipation and some herbal enhancement, I listened to it, and was BLOWN AWAY.

    I literally heard colors for the first time. It was probably similar to Eno's epiphany when he was lying in the hospital bed listening to the half-broken tape player. A new way of listening to music.

    This record opened my ears to the way that an artist can create a soundscape which is more than just a mixture of sounds.

    Fripp's solo on that song is one of my all-time favorites--in fact, several of my all-time favorite guitar solos are by RP, and I literally wore out one copy of that record and had to get another. Same with HCTWJ, after I finally added it to my collection.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.