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  1. #1

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    If you would indulge me, could you express your favorite type of Jazz, and maybe why? While I like pretty much all of the styles, often depending on my mood, minor Jazz Blues hits home with me.

    I think I picked it up because it was a part of a lot of smoky, film noir movies and television shows that I and my family watched as a youth. Also, I find I have an easier time playing minor tunes since I started out playing a lot of minor scale and minor pentatonic on Rock and Blues songs.

    Thanks.

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  3. #2

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    Hard bop and "post-bop" styles. So I know that's a huge amount of music, but that's what I dig, music that's "informed" by bebop, but isn't bebop, if that makes sense?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Hard bop and "post-bop" styles. So I know that's a huge amount of music, but that's what I dig, music that's "informed" by bebop, but isn't bebop, if that makes sense?
    Yes it does. And that type of genre runs a very close second in my mind! There are really some heavy hitters in that group.

    At the stage of life I am currently in, I have just been feeling a little more "bluesy." When I think of Post Bop and Hard Bop, to me, they are more full of life, and they reach out more. For me, the Bluesy stuff is kind of introspective and more mindful on one's personal struggles, looking more inward.

    Post Bop, like Wayne Shorter, with those 4ths and sus chords, give me a dreamy feeling, almost like a high. Hard Bop drives me more, the way good rhythmic music does. I stomp my foot when I try to play this type.

  5. #4

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    yeah anything in a minor key for me, can be ballad, medium, up, swing, bop, bossa, Blue Note, post, whatever.

    I'm just a miserable so-and-so.

  6. #5

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    Maybe Django. He was flashy, not American, a gambler and a drunk.
    Seemed like a regular guy.

  7. #6

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    I like hard bop / soul jazz a lot. The mix of gospel, blues, swing, and bop. Three of my all-time favorite recordings






    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlsoRan View Post
    Yes it does. And that type of genre runs a very close second in my mind! There are really some heavy hitters in that group.

    At the stage of life I am currently in, I have just been feeling a little more "bluesy." When I think of Post Bop and Hard Bop, to me, they are more full of life, and they reach out more. For me, the Bluesy stuff is kind of introspective and more mindful on one's personal struggles, looking more inward.

    Post Bop, like Wayne Shorter, with those 4ths and sus chords, give me a dreamy feeling, almost like a high. Hard Bop drives me more, the way good rhythmic music does. I stomp my foot when I try to play this type.
    I still feel like I'm cheating, as there's so much bluesy hard bop...my answer allows me to cover so much ground.

    If I made a much narrower choice for a favorite "jazz sound," it'd be organ trios or trios plus sax...but I'd eventually tire of it, I'm sure, if it was all I listened to.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  9. #8

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    50s jazz trios and quartets always do it for me. I think it's due to the little jazz band who played in the bar on 77 Sunset Strip. So cool.

  10. #9

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    I first heard the Lennie Tristano sextet Capital sessions 42 years ago. It sort of set the bar for everything I have heard since...

  11. #10

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    Swing, for sure, but I lean hard toward small ensembles with a vocalist over big band.

  12. #11

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    I guess I'd say roughly post 1960 stuff. Hard bop, post bop, fusion (not all fusion. some of it is kind of wanky, but there's also some really good stuff, and that's what got me into jazz in the first place.)
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  13. #12

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    For me, it's the Goodman small groups. Trio, quartet, sextet, septet, but the original sextet is the apex of it. Basie is close. But if I were forced to listen to only one group for the rest of my life, it would be the Goodman small groups.

  14. #13

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    THIS. I like bop, I really like hard bop, I love swing, I "am a friend of" the avant-garde, but THIS cuts into my soul and messes it up.


  15. #14
    Well, half my cds are american jazz 57 to 63..

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by omphalopsychos View Post
    THIS. I like bop, I really like hard bop, I love swing, I "am a friend of" the avant-garde, but THIS cuts into my soul and messes it up.
    Have you heard this one? Lacy and Charles Davis with the great Roy Hanes on the drums...


  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by guido5 View Post
    Have you heard this one? Lacy and Charles Davis with the great Roy Hanes on the drums...

    Have I! I am nuts for Steve Lacy, from his early recordings to the end. I find him to be one of the most imaginative melodists.

  18. #17

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    Can't really say enough about this album, Kenny Burrell's "Midnight Blue." I love everything about it.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  19. #18
    Great thread!
    My listening habits tend to vary week to week, but I tend to gravitate towards post-bop quartets/quintets with some avant-garde tendencies - e.g. Trane's quartet circa 1965, Miles Davis's second quintet, the current Wayne Shorter Quartet.

    I also really enjoy many contemporary artists coming out of the M-Base school such as Steve Coleman, Ambrose Akinmusire, Vijay Iyer, Miles Okazaki, and others.

    However, this week's theme has been all things Pat Martino (Live at Yoshi's --wow...)

  20. #19

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    I like most straight ahead jazz from the 20's to now, but my favorite for the last 25 years is soul jazz, particularly Hammond B-3 organ groups. no coincidence that 99% of my gigs are organ based...

  21. #20

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    Over the last couple of years I seem to have listened to hundreds of hours of Snarky Puppy - what type of jazz is that ? I'm addicted.

    It sort of sets the trend, as mostly I listen to stuff recorded in the last 20 years - mainly guitarists: first and foremost Sco, but also plenty of Martino, Lagrene, Metheny, Stern, Holdsworth, McLaughlin, plus some not so well known names, Ant Law, Jordan Klemons (!!!) etc. Also keyboards based stuff: Hiromi, Chick, Esbjorn Svensson, etc .

    For me it seems it is not so much a question of style, but of time, i.e. contemporary rather than vintage. However that doesn't stop me from indulging in the occasional Miles fest, when I spend a couple of weeks going through the back catalogue, but after Kind of Blue, my favourite Miles album is Tutu - which kind of says it all about what speaks to my soul.

    (Secret passion: jazzier blues guitarists; Carlton, Ford, Hinds).
    Have no secrets, hear no lies.

  22. #21

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    Wes, Kenny, Emily, the more bluesy and melodic crowd, early Benson for *that* groove. Gypsy jazz for its clarity, simplicity, melodic content, virtuosity, strong rhythms.

    I am afraid that very little, if any, modern jazz does much for me. Without wanting to criticize anyone, it often sounds like an intellectual exercise to me, more than an expression of emotion. I have the highest respect for all these musicians and players but my soul it is mostly not touching, sorry.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by newsense View Post
    Over the last couple of years I seem to have listened to hundreds of hours of Snarky Puppy - what type of jazz is that ? I'm addicted.

    It sort of sets the trend, as mostly I listen to stuff recorded in the last 20 years - mainly guitarists: first and foremost Sco, but also plenty of Martino, Lagrene, Metheny, Stern, Holdsworth, McLaughlin, plus some not so well known names, Ant Law, Jordan Klemons (!!!) etc. Also keyboards based stuff: Hiromi, Chick, Esbjorn Svensson, etc .

    For me it seems it is not so much a question of style, but of time, i.e. contemporary rather than vintage. However that doesn't stop me from indulging in the occasional Miles fest, when I spend a couple of weeks going through the back catalogue, but after Kind of Blue, my favourite Miles album is Tutu - which kind of says it all about what speaks to my soul.

    (Secret passion: jazzier blues guitarists; Carlton, Ford, Hinds).
    I think Snarky Puppy is from my area. I saw them several years ago. I don't know how to quantify their music so I just take it as it comes. They are infectious, young performers.

  24. #23

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    mid 30's to 40's; sometimes I think I was born in the wrong time. I love Tiny Grimmes, Fat's Waller, Ella, Lena Horn, Eddie Condon, Billie Holiday- to name a few. My My, where has this style gone? I started to watch the Grammy's... then I thought "What in the World am I doing?"

  25. #24

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    Post-bop/modal is what speaks to my musical aesthetic, and when Miles, Wayne, Trane, Herbie, Joe Henderson, etc., started writing their own jazz compositions as improvisational vehicles rather than blow over GAS standards, my ears were waiting. I love that modern sound and different concepts that were being explored. Some can get spiritual like Coltrane's intent.

    For me, that continues to be the branch of the jazz tree that is still exploring newer things.

    Next to that, modern groove with a nod to New Orleans pokes me where I'm human.


  26. #25

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    There's a ton of jazz that speaks to my soul, but I can't say what "type" it is … Is "good" a type?

    I do like the "George Garzone type" of jazz, if that's a thing.

  27. #26

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    Have to correct myself - Julian Lage of the young guys does speak to me. What a wonderful musician.

  28. #27

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    Of the younger generation of guitarists I like both Lage Lund and Gilad Hekselman. Wonderfully lyrical players who respect the tradition while bring their own personalities to the mix...

  29. #28

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    Someone mentioned organ trios above. I love those too, esp Jimmy Smith's with Kenny Burrell on guitar and Grady Tate on drums. Here's Joey D with Frank Vignola on guitar and Joe Ascione on drums, live in '99.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  30. #29

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    These are a couple of things that do it for me lately. A lot Charles Lloyd's stuff speaks to me. I was lucky enough to catch that show from Lincoln Center. Not sure I could put into words about the "why" but when he launched into Masters of War the hairs on my neck stood up. I think the Marvels is quite an interesting entity. The pedal steel creates another dimension along with Frisell's dreamy landscapes and the Rhythm section is so solid and grounding. Add Charles Lloyd' sax and flute for take off time.

    I never heard of Kenny Garrett until I won tickets to see him live. The next day I ordered a few of his CD's and was pretty amazed at what I'd been missing.

    I too too enjoy the hard bop from the 50's and 60's and of course Midnight Blue but I really find it a lot fun and meaningful to witness it unfold live when I get the chance!

  31. #30

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    Hard to pick, but Brazilian jazz is very close to my heart. Edu Lobo, Toninho Horta, Chico Pinheiro, Trio Corrente, Tres, Stan Getz's Bossa recordings, Jobim's compositions, Dori Caymmi and more.

  32. #31

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    Lester Young as the first. Then in random order: Art Tatum. Duke Ellington. Count Basie. Bud Powell. Wes Montgomery. Jobim. Bill Frisell. Just to name a few.
    "But if they all play like me, then who am I?" (Lester Young)

  33. #32

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    I don't really listen to this (or any music for the matter), but when I hear it I like it, except when it's obvious fake fashion ...

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  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alter View Post
    Well, half my cds are american jazz 57 to 63..
    Only half?

  35. #34

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    30’s and 40’s swing! Also organ trios.


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  36. #35

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    So basically we agree that no jazz after 1970 speaks to the soul, no?

  37. #36

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    Bill Evans.
    Especially when his voicings show his interest in the impressionists.
    I wish I could find a similar aesthetic on guitar.

  38. #37

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    Metheny - early 80's
    Jim Hall Live
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  39. #38

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    I really like Melissa Aldana, very Mark Turnerish saxophone player.

  40. #39

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    If I had to play one style or genre of jazz in a group setting it would be the type exemplified by the link below. I also would have liked to play in a Miles Davis Agharta period band (second link)





  41. #40

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    I kinda have two separate branches -- hard bop/soul jazz on the one hand, and really good fusion on the other (Chick, Weather Report, Metheny, Hiromi, Scofield).

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Metheny - early 80's
    Jim Hall Live
    Good taste

    Otherwise, my answer on TS question is ECM jazz and post-bop. These styles are highly interesting because of the incorporating avant-garde and impressionist elements. Also, ECM jazz and post-bop recordings are generally atmospheric and introvert. Unique sounds that still sounds fresh and updated.

  43. #42

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    I like Dixieland/New Orleans jazz (Armstrong, etc), Swing/Big band (Artie Shaw, Glenn Miller, Dorseys...), Latin jazz (Charlie Byrd...). I get nothing from cerebral, academic jazz. Why? Beats me. I don't know why I like broccoli, either.

  44. #43

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    Tbh .... I'm struggling to find any music that speaks to my soul these days

  45. #44

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    Early jazz (Louis Armstrong), Billie Holiday, big band swing, and the jump blues like Louis Jordan that came directly after swing.

    I can't tell you why, it just does.

    As much as I love other jazz- Johnny Smith and such, it still doesn't "speak to my soul" like the early stuff does. I often wonder if I am reincarnated from that era, lol.

  46. #45

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    Mine isn't genre so much as it is individuals:

    Lester Young
    Clifford Brown
    Elvin Jones
    Tony Williams
    Roy Haynes
    Ahmad Jamal

    I pretty much love everything by these people.

  47. #46

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    I listen to jazz using my head more than my soul, but Latin and Afro-Cuban jazz is soul music for me.

    E.g. the Ike Quebec \ Kenny Burrell album Soul Samba.


  48. #47

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    Django, CC, Lester Young, Miles in the '50s

  49. #48

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    Django..... Joyful music, and it works for me every time.

  50. #49

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    I am a sap. I love torch songs and no, I am not gay, not that there is anything wrong with that. So, torch songs and improvise over the changes
    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  51. #50

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    Invitation is a beautiful song with interesting chord changes and the use of those minor 9th chords.

    Here is another version: