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  1. #1

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    I just got plenty of vinyls from the parents of one of my students, because they are moving, and they dont need those. They reckon these discs as some "junk", which take place from other things and otherwise these discs are only good at gathering dust...

    I realized again that these vinyl discs have much more dynamics, than cds dvds, cassettes, etc. And somehow they can make a very deep emotional attachment to the person who owns them, and takes care of them.

    Not to mention the artistric paintings on the covers, and that vinyl smell...

    Who has a good repertory of vinyls? What kind of vinyl player do You use?

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues

    I just got plenty of vinyls from the parents of one of my students, because they are moving, and they dont need those. They reckon these discs as some "junk", which take place from other things and otherwise these discs are only good at gathering dust...

    I realized again that these vinyl discs have much more dynamics, than cds dvds, cassettes, etc. And somehow they can make a very deep emotional attachment to the person who owns them, and takes care of them.

    Not to mention the artistric paintings on the covers, and that vinyl smell...

    Who has a good repertory of vinyls? What kind of vinyl player do You use?
    I've lived in five different countries over the past four decades, and my vinyl collection is reduced. I use hi-fi separates and my turntable is a basic Pro-Ject.

    My brother, a true 'audiophile' who also works for a specialist high-end audio engineering company as a tech, turns his nose up at my gear - but his are the kind of Impossible Standards that bring out a knowing smile in me.

    On the other hand, after taking a chance and including vinyl in the gifts I gave last Christmas (a Queen reissue, which is bringing some pleasure), what's priceless is watching my little daughter put on vinyl and read lyrics or gaze in wonder at album art.

    Vinyl reduces screen time, too - which I think is a huge plus.
    Last edited by destinytot; 05-02-2017 at 06:37 AM.

  4. #3

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    My turntable is also a basic Pro-Ject, and it works absolutely fine for my ears.

    The new 180g vinyl is really good quality, while some of the thinner albums made in the last years of vinyl (the early CD era) are really quite poor. I got Kind Of Blue on 180g vinyl, and it is stunning. Lots of old jazz LPs in second-hand record stores and charity shops around here.

    My 20-year old daughter caught the bug for vinyl too, says it's incomparable in a positive way to CDs.
    Last edited by Rob MacKillop; 05-02-2017 at 10:11 AM.

  5. #4

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    I've got about 400 vinyl LPs because I bought them before CDs existed. I too have one of the basic Pro-Ject turntables and it sounds very good to my ears. After that it goes into a JVC amplifier and Wharfedale speakers both of which I bought 35 years ago and are still going great.

    Occasionally I have to clean some of the older LPs with a cleaning fluid and cloth, but they come up sounding fresh afterwards.

    A photographer friend of mine came round the other night and he was enthusing about the great cover photo of Hampton Hawes on his 'Green Leaves of Summer' record (he had not seen the original cover). So I got the actual LP out to show him. You can't beat the look of those old LP covers!

  6. #5

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    Like Rob and Graham, I've the basic Pro-Ject Essential II turntable, running into 30+ year old Sony amp (£20 off eBay) and a pair of Sony speakers from a CD system that I've had for 20 years. I'm perfectly happy with it.

    I've a small collection about 50 LPs that I've built up over the last year. I've only paid "collectors' prices" for a couple of things - an original Riverside issue of 'The Trio' w/Billy Bean and a signed copy of Mark Murphy's first LP.

    Most of the other things I've picked up pottering around the secondhand record shops and charity shops. I've a handful of the recent Blue Note and Impulse reissues on 180g vinyl, which are excellent. I've got most of Barry Harris's output for fair prices. I've plenty of LPs from Xanadu ('70s releases by Jimmy Raney, Charles McPherson, Barry Harris), '80s ECM (Paul Motian, Bill Frisell) and the early years of Criss Cross (Warne Marsh, Jimmy Raney).

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B
    Like Rob and Graham, I've the basic Pro-Ject Essential II turntable
    Quote Originally Posted by destinytot
    my turntable is a basic Pro-Ject.
    If you include me, that would make four.

  8. #7

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    I think I have around 1200 jazz lps from my days scouring the used record shops.

    I'm using a hot rodded 1960s Dynaco Stereo 70 tube amp and Lafayette tube preamp and an old A/R table.

    Run these through a pair of old Boston Acoustics A100's that I lined w/modeling clay.

  9. #8

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    I have a a hundred or so vinyl albums of various genres (I had a lot more by got rid of a bunch of several years ago). I'm currently living in somewhat crowded conditions with no real room to set up a turntable, so I haven't been able to listen to any in a while, but I have a Thorens TD 146 that I glommed from my parents many years ago (mom redecorated; dad's audiophile system paid the price). One of these days ...

    That said, I'm definitely not a "vinyl is better" kind of guy. I agree that some vinyl sounds better than some CD's, but I think that's mainly a matter of how they were mastered, not a function of the media themselves. Especially in the early days of CD, a lot of albums were really badly mastered when first re-released on CD, but properly masterered CD's have better dynamic range and fidelity. Lack of surface noise is a really good thing, too, IMO. I stil remember the first time I heard a CD. A friend got one of the early Sony's in 83, and we listened to Metheny's Off-Ramp and Thomas Dolby's The Golden Age or Wireless in both vinyl and CD. The difference in dynamics and clarity was astonishing. I think another reason some prefer Vinyl is that distortion actually sounds good to many people (or at least it's what they're accustomed to), so they prefer vinyl even when it's demonstrably lower fidelity than digital formats. Plus there's the whole neo-retro-hipster-luddite thing that results in crappy stuff being declared superior and people paying $2000 for plywood Kay guitars. But all of THAT said, album covers are really cool, as is the experience of listening to albums with distinct first and second sides.

    John

  10. #9

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    I bought a Pioneer turntable at my fave used record store for $80 a few years ago, and inherited my father's Yamaha RX 530 Stereo Receiver, and ancient AR speakers.
    It's important to note that the new stereo amps don't have phono jacks, and you have to buy an expensive pre-amp to hook up a turntable to them.
    Like Winter Moon, I spent half my life in used record stores, amassing EVERY Johnny Smith, Tal Farlow, Jimmy Raney, Joe Puma, Chuck Wayne and Ed Bickert LP they made as leaders, and many things they were sidemen on.
    To this day, I'll buy any vinyl with a jazz guitarist on it. My latest vinyl acquisition was a Joe Sgro LP entitled "A guitar and you", with a nude chick on the cover, that has her private parts covered by a classical guitar, as she longingly looks straight into my eyes.

    This is a 'mood music' LP that features Sgro acc. by only bass, drums and vibes, playing standards, and semi-classical things with titles like 'Rachmaninoff and You', Tchaikovsky After Hours', Ravel After Hours, Tchaikovsky Sits In, and The Lady Likes Chopin.

    Sgro only plays chord melodies of the tunes, with the vibes doubling the melody in octaves. He only blows a little on 'Harlem Nocturne, but you can tell he's a very good improviser.

    His block chord voicings are played with the precision of Johnny Smith, and you can see a lot of similarities betwixt the two guitarists.

  11. #10

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    I don't have that one sgcim, I have another he made and honestly it's not very good, though I wouldn't mind owning the Super on the cover.
    But he was a legendary teacher around here that taught many excellent players through the yrs. he aalso was a cousin of the great violinist Joe Venuti and was regarded as an excellent violinist as well, they called him 'little Joe'

    I did the same thing as you, I'd hear someone I liked regardless of instrument they played and had to have every recording they appeared on as leader or sideman. Haven't been in a record shop in years, but about lived in them back then.

    Last edited by wintermoon; 05-03-2017 at 03:14 PM.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    I don't have that one sgcim, I have another he made and honestly it's not very good, though I wouldn't mind owning the Super on the cover.
    But he was a legendary teacher around here that taught many excellent players through the yrs. he aalso was a cousin of the great violinist Joe Venuti and was regarded as an excellent violinist as well, they called him 'little Joe'

    I did the same thing as you, I'd hear someone I liked regardless of instrument they played and had to have every recording they appeared on as leader or sideman. Haven't been in a record shop in years, but about lived in them back then.

    Yeah, I've heard bad things about that record. I only paid $3 for the Sgro record I mentioned above, and it's all Sgro. I heard he only plays about 50% of the time on 'Plays for Someone Like You', and the band plays the rest of the time.
    I also picked up a 1957 record called 'Winners Circle' featuring John Coltrane(!), Eddie Costa(!), Gene Quill, Kenny Burrell, Al Cohn, Donald Byrd, Frank Rehak, Oscar Pettiford, Rolf Kuhn, Art Farmer and Philly Jo Jones!

    They play in three different small groups, and there's some excellent 'Trane, Quill, Byrd and Rehak on it,
    Again, only $3.

  13. #12

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    The description of Joe Sgro's chordal playing reminds me of an early Ike Isaacs album I have. I'll dig it out for its details.

  14. #13

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    Got my records and stereo back after my fiancee's daughter's divorce (I had loaned these to them on the condition it stayed "in the family.") Her daughter is currently living with us awhile until she starts a new job.

    So got the Nakamichi TA-1A receiver (unfortunately the tuner doesn't work anymore...), Onkyo turntable with Shure M92E cartridge, and Bose 301s set up. BTW, the IKEA Kallax shelves make an excellent vinyl storage unit with room for the stereo on top.

    Vinyl fans anyone?-img_9369-jpg

    I guess I have about 500 records (thought I had more). Some prime stuff like vintage middle period Miles and Coltrane., about 30 Zappa records, some very nice classical stuff not available anymore.

    I amit there's something therapeutic about vinyl. It's a whole body experience, to take the record out, clean it, and put the needle down. Pure endorphins.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    I have a a hundred or so vinyl albums of various genres (I had a lot more by got rid of a bunch of several years ago). I'm currently living in somewhat crowded conditions with no real room to set up a turntable, so I haven't been able to listen to any in a while, but I have a Thorens TD 146 that I glommed from my parents many years ago (mom redecorated; dad's audiophile system paid the price). One of these days ...

    That said, I'm definitely not a "vinyl is better" kind of guy. I agree that some vinyl sounds better than some CD's, but I think that's mainly a matter of how they were mastered, not a function of the media themselves. Especially in the early days of CD, a lot of albums were really badly mastered when first re-released on CD, but properly masterered CD's have better dynamic range and fidelity. Lack of surface noise is a really good thing, too, IMO. I stil remember the first time I heard a CD. A friend got one of the early Sony's in 83, and we listened to Metheny's Off-Ramp and Thomas Dolby's The Golden Age or Wireless in both vinyl and CD. The difference in dynamics and clarity was astonishing. I think another reason some prefer Vinyl is that distortion actually sounds good to many people (or at least it's what they're accustomed to), so they prefer vinyl even when it's demonstrably lower fidelity than digital formats. Plus there's the whole neo-retro-hipster-luddite thing that results in crappy stuff being declared superior and people paying $2000 for plywood Kay guitars. But all of THAT said, album covers are really cool, as is the experience of listening to albums with distinct first and second sides.

    John
    Probably true. In the early days of CD some were poorly mastered and too compressed and tended to not sound good. Even now to my aged ears some digital format stuff doesn't sound the way I remember it on vinyl--Elvis Costello and Steely Dan come to mind. Plus I'm convinced nothing will equal the old Rudy van Gelder recordings of Miles and Coltrane on record.

    But most of the time I go along with the convenience of streaming...

  16. #15

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    Maybe it's the nostalgia more than anything for me. My Christmas treat for myself is a pack of cigarettes, a couple of mixed drinks and playing a few records. Little classical and a little jazz, room lit by the glow from the face of the old tuner/amp.

  17. #16

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    I used to love vinyl, I used to love a woman named Alicia. They're both long gone and I neither miss nor get sentimental about either one. They were great, and then they weren't. They're in my history for a reason.
    The opposite of love is indifference; I would listen to vinyl, but I sure wouldn't pay for it in the 21st century.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by beardog
    Maybe it's the nostalgia more than anything for me. My Christmas treat for myself is a pack of cigarettes, a couple of mixed drinks and playing a few records. Little classical and a little jazz, room lit by the glow from the face of the old tuner/amp.
    Sinatra is smiling somewhere in heaven right now...

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    I used to love vinyl, I used to love a woman named Alicia. They're both long gone and I neither miss nor get sentimental about either one. They were great, and then they weren't. They're in my history for a reason.
    I used to love a pretty brunette named Cathy. We got involved when her husband threw out most of her records in a fit of pique, and she threw him out. She told me the story in the University post office. I suggested that she come over to my place when she had a chance to record some of my collection on cassette.

    She came over a week later wearing a cool pink jumper and pink platform shoes with ribbon ties. She had makeup on as well.

    She still had a decent number of interesting records--LOVED Zappa, Bowie and Eno--and we traded recordings for awhile, and went to concerts, and one thing led to another, etc.

    She's also long gone, but I still have the records that we listened to and a few of her mix tapes, with the cool little block lettering--"A Cat Production." Some of the records still have a few cannabis seeds in the middle seam from when we used to separate the seeds from the leaves back in the day (sorry for you youngsters, ask your dad or uncle what I'm talking about).

    I mostly stream albums these days, but then you have nothing to sort through 35 years later, wondering where the hell she is and what she's up to and how did you end up where you are now.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 12-23-2017 at 12:53 AM.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A.
    That said, I'm definitely not a "vinyl is better" kind of guy. I agree that some vinyl sounds better than some CD's, but I think that's mainly a matter of how they were mastered, not a function of the media themselves. Especially in the early days of CD, a lot of albums were really badly mastered when first re-released on CD, but properly masterered CD's have better dynamic range and fidelity. Lack of surface noise is a really good thing, too, IMO. I stil remember the first time I heard a CD. A friend got one of the early Sony's in 83, and we listened to Metheny's Off-Ramp and Thomas Dolby's The Golden Age or Wireless in both vinyl and CD. The difference in dynamics and clarity was astonishing. I think another reason some prefer Vinyl is that distortion actually sounds good to many people (or at least it's what they're accustomed to), so they prefer vinyl even when it's demonstrably lower fidelity than digital formats. Plus there's the whole neo-retro-hipster-luddite thing that results in crappy stuff being declared superior and people paying $2000 for plywood Kay guitars. But all of THAT said, album covers are really cool, as is the experience of listening to albums with distinct first and second sides.
    I agree completely. I tend to hold with the way Walter Becker put it: "Hey, if you actually WANT a medium that can't tell the signal from the noise, that's your business."

    I have a lot of CDs, but these days I mostly do streaming. The thing I like about streaming is that I get to hear new (to me) music all the time. If someone mentions something they think I should hear, I can just punch it up. "These are the days of miracles and wonders."

  21. #20

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    I worked in new and used record stores for years in high school and college. And haunted others. So I also ended up with about 400 LPs I lug every time I move.

    These days I have a reconditioned Technics SL1300, Shure cart., a low-end Marantz amp and CD player, and bookshelf KEF speakers. But I also often just ask Alexa for whatever is in my head at the moment. The Technics is fading. I might go with a Pro-Ject if it becomes problematic.

    I like Doc's IKEA Kallax shelves! But I really wish I had space to build in a rack like we had in record stores. Big wooden cabinet. Just belly up to it, start flipping the disc jackets forward, hunting and perusing. Now that's living!

  22. #21

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    I'm a vinyl fan but I sold my TT and phono about 2 years ago because I just wasn't using them enough, but I kept all my vinyl. I have an endgame level DAC now (thank you Black Friday and local open box deal) which blows away most digital and is basically on par with vinyl, but I still see myself setting up a vinyl rig again one day because I enjoy the vinyl experience and it's fun to find old records when travelling.

  23. #22

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    More than 2000 vinyls here. And keep buying. Belt drive turntable and 4 pairs of different JBL Studio Monitors, my preferred the 4315B.

  24. #23

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    Lots of vinyl here, although we use streaming a lot too.

    I just had the JVC QL-Y66F serviced and I have a fairly new Ortotofon Super OM-20 on it. The mag-lev motor and all of the electromagnets are working perfectly.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    I'm a vinyl fan but I sold my TT and phono about 2 years ago because I just wasn't using them enough, but I kept all my vinyl. I have an endgame level DAC now (thank you Black Friday and local open box deal) which blows away most digital and is basically on par with vinyl, but I still see myself setting up a vinyl rig again one day because I enjoy the vinyl experience and it's fun to find old records when travelling.
    I'm back on vinyl! I picked up a new integrated amp with an excellent built-in phono stage during Fall 2019 Black Friday sales, knowing that one day kinda soon I'd pick up a TT. The general slower pace of the COVID world got me thinking that it's a good time to start listening to my vinyl collection again and I've now picked up a new TT. My digital set up is endgame but the vinyl is still superior to my ears - the main downside of vinyl is that some pressings have lousy quality; in general I think digital recordings are more consistent, but as long as the vinyl is pretty good then it usually sounds better. I have a few albums in both formats and it's fun to compare (The Bridge sounds great on both versions; ditto Herbie Mann's bossa albums with Billy Bean on guitar). Coltrane's Blue Train album already sounds incredible on digital - can't wait to receive the 180g vinyl pressing I ordered.

    What I love about vinyl, other than that is can sound better than digital (but again, not always hugely better if the digital rig is up to the task), is that there's no remote control. There's no pausing, fast forwarding, changing one's mind, etc. You put the needle down and you listen with full concentration for 20 minutes. It's kind of meditative.

  26. #25

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    I about gave up trying to find an original copy that doesn't cost a small fortune so I bought a copy of this Big John Patton lp last week on 180 gram vinyl and it sounds superb, much like an original Blue Note. Most of my lps are orig copies or maybe early 2nd pressings, but these 180 gram reissues live up to the hype.


    Last edited by wintermoon; 05-02-2020 at 12:58 AM.

  27. #26

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    I still have perhaps a bit less than half of the vinyl collection I accumulated over my formative years until grudgingly shifting my new music purchases to CD (about four years after the format’s commercial introduction). Probably a couple hundred albums. The ones I let go of were either music I had gotten out of my system or that I had duplicated on CD and at some point didn’t see the need to hold on to the vinyl. The most precious of my vinyl collection, which includes all the classical, jazz, and my favorite pop/rock through the early 80’s, is still intact. I have a Technics SLQ-2000 that dates from whenever the hell that model was originally released. It had the original cartridge and stylus (easily 35+ years old with literally tens of thousands of hours of wear) until about two months ago when I upgraded them. I have access to a very good microscope at my work, and inspected the stylus tip on the old cartridge when I removed it, and compared it to the new one. I couldn’t detect much evidence of wear, but there was some corrosion on the metal bits. It still sounded fine - I just wanted to see what improvement I might hear from a new cartridge. (It’s a bit ‘livelier’ than the old one - worth the investment but not a quantum leap.) I still have my Technics receiver and a nice pair of Polk bookshelf speakers. All but the turntable are in storage but I’m moving back to my house in September and cannot wait to have my stereo reassembled. I have a few new (to me) jazz guitar albums I can’t wait to spin up and listen to through the Polks. For now if I want to listen to the subset of my vinyl that’s with me in the apartment, I use headphones or play through my Yamaha THR-10C.

  28. #27

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    Vinyl, bah....original hi-fi was recorded on tape, now mostly digital. It's just an audio transfer to vinyl, not a mechanical duplication. I was raised on it, but you listen to it a lot casually it pops and crackles because every time you play it, it degrades. I'm not into maintaining a music playback laboratory.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Vinyl, bah....original hi-fi was recorded on tape, now mostly digital. It's just an audio transfer to vinyl, not a mechanical duplication. I was raised on it, but you listen to it a lot casually it pops and crackles because every time you play it, it degrades. I'm not into maintaining a music playback laboratory.
    One of the main benefits of CD, which I appreciate, is the lack of media degradation as a result of use. I was lucky enough to have someone teach me about proper handling of albums at an early age (it’s really pretty simple and becomes habit quickly), and as a result my vinyl collection is fairly pristine. I always get complements when I take a handful down to the record store to sell. Still, I find the background audio anomalies of vinyl somehow soothing. It takes me back to my early years of music listening and comforts me.

  30. #29

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    I don't buy the "vinyl sounds better" thing, but I still have about 200 of my favorite albums from my misspent youth left, in pristine condition, luckily, and my old B&O turntable. Once in a while I'll give one a spin and take a trip down memory lane. I think I actually like the artwork as much or more. I designed an album frame many years ago and a good buddy, who's into woodworking, built a few and gave me one. It hangs in my den now and I'm constantly rotating albums through it. (Currently it has Neil Young's Time Fades Away in it.)

    Vinyl fans anyone?-time-fades-away-jpg

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrblues


    Who has a good repertory of vinyls? What kind of vinyl player do You use?
    I threw away all of my vinyl because they don't fit in my phone. I'll take a BIG hit in fidelity for transportability.

    As of now I have some 80 gigs and 14,000 tunes ripped from my CD collection (backed up a half dozen times off line) with some 170 gigs left for expansion on a little memory card as large as my pinky/pinkie nail. Vinyl can't (for me) touch that.

  32. #31

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    I was explaining to my guitar teacher, a very nice young man who is eking out a living playing and teaching jazz guitar, about buying a record back in the day, and if you didn’t like it, well dammit, you kept playing until you did. None of this streaming business where you listen to something for 30 seconds and then look for something else.

    I still have some of my vinyl. There have been a few purges over the years, but I’ve still got some LPs. Unfortunately, my wife’s Elton John records also survived.

    I have a Rega Planar tt that I found for $5 in a thrift store, running into a 30-year old Linn int amp and a modern pair of PSB speakers. I like the records, but I like my CDs, downloads, and streaming too. It’s all good.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bach5G
    >>SNIP<<Unfortunately, my wife’s Elton John records also survived.>>SNIP<<
    That reminds me of a vinyl story...

    Some time in the 90's my ex had a few remaining LP's (among others, Traffic's John barleycorn must die and Chicago Transit Authority) that we had not duplicated on CD and she asked me to get her a record player so she could play them.

    Well I got one, hooked it up and after a few weeks with her playing them quite a bit I asked her how she liked the record player, and she said she was loving it but she thought the records were a LOT longer... Being a big CD owner I asked her if she was playing the "B" side... she said, "WHAT B side"?

    We tossed the LP's, donated the player and found her missing LP's on CD format. That was a Paradigm shift for her there :-) :-)

  34. #33

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    How'd I ever miss this thread!

    VINYL? But of course! And you're right, the dynamics etc. etc. are far and above what one will find on digital. I've some 500 albums, and buying more all the time.

    I'm using a Marantz TT15S1 turntable which came with a $900 Clear Audio Maestro stylus. Very good setup for $1500. Gets you 95% there. Of course one can spend their shirts off attempting to gain that last 5%.

    Vinyl rules - Still!

    edit - and btw...clean those old records and get them nearly 100% clear of those clicks and pops with a VPI 16.5 record cleaner. Best investment I ever made. VPI has been producing the 16.5 or some version of it for some 30 years. See the review below.



    Last edited by 2bornot2bop; 05-13-2020 at 07:42 PM.

  35. #34

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    Finally upgraded my 5 year old entry level Audio Technica turntable. It got a ton of use and did its job, but I am looking forward to the upgrade. While Prime and 2 day delivery was tempting when no one locally could get it, I decided to order one of these out of a indie shop in NYC. It should deliver next week.




    Debut Carbon (DC) – Pro-Ject Audio Systems

  36. #35

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    Love vinyl, it's the best!

    I don't have a super huge collection, but a few hundred at least. Mainly Jazz (love those gatefolded Impulse Coltrane albums) , pop and metal

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters
    I don't buy the "vinyl sounds better" thing, but I still have about 200 of my favorite albums from my misspent youth left, in pristine condition, luckily, and my old B&O turntable. Once in a while I'll give one a spin and take a trip down memory lane. I think I actually like the artwork as much or more. I designed an album frame many years ago and a good buddy, who's into woodworking, built a few and gave me one. It hangs in my den now and I'm constantly rotating albums through it. (Currently it has Neil Young's Time Fades Away in it.)
    Over the past month I've been listening to vinyl every day. In most cases, albums I also have in digital. My digital rig is endgame (Resonessence Invicta) and I'm listening to lossless ripped from my CDs. My vinyl rig is not endgame (TT is very good but phono pre-amp is the built-in MC of my Yamaha AS2100; cartridge is modest Hana SL MC). The vinyl sounds better across all albums. The difference is like MP3 vs. CD - mostly in the depth and height of the soundstage. The Bill Evans trio albums are great examples of this, but Coltrane's Blue Trane had it too (and a bunch of others). If I had my speakers right up against the wall then I might not notice these things but mine are pulled out a healthy amount (about 20" from back wall and more from side walls). I wonder about the speaker placement of those who don't feel vinyl sounds better - and also if they're on MM or MC.