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  1. #1

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    I just got a BB King album, My Kind Of Blues, in a new 180 grams vinyl release. The weight is very reassuringly heavy, the packaging is first rate, and the sound is wonderful - and what a great album!

    They have a jazz catalogue with loads of classic albums. I was about to recommend them to all here, but after looking up the name of the company, Wax Time, I read some comments that these are illegal in the States, but legal in Europe. The company are apparently based in Spain. I don't know what the licence deals are, and will leave it to others to dig deep into it if they want to. But, as I say, in Europe they are legal.

    Here's the Wax Time page on the distribution site of System Records:
    http://www.systemrecords.co.uk/advan...turers_id=9929

    This is the best vinyl quality I've had.
    Last edited by Rob MacKillop; 09-13-2014 at 01:09 PM.

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  3. #2

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    PS The album comes with a card with a code number for a free download version of the same album!

  4. #3

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    Fascinating. I grew up on 45s and albums, so I'm glad to see there's still a market for vinyl pressings.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  5. #4

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    I was a recording engineer when vinyl was still around and one the keys to good records was how often they replace the stamper plates. The Beach Boys were first artist to specify how many pressing could be made on a plate and then plates had to be replaced.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    I was a recording engineer when vinyl was still around and one the keys to good records was how often they replace the stamper plates. The Beach Boys were first artist to specify how many pressing could be made on a plate and then plates had to be replaced.
    Thanks, doc. I never thought about that. How many pressings did they allow before replacing a plate? (Which album did they start this with? "Pet Sounds"?)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  7. #6

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    180g slab of wax. There's them black gold. Rob, treat it right. Go find thee a Regaplanar 3 with an RB300 tonearm and set it up right.

    Pure analogue records played back on a properly set up record deck through valve amps and simple 2-or 3-way speakers like any of the Harbeths send shivers down your spine. Turn off the light. Good old frisson.

    The UK is quite the home of récherché valve amp makers. David Manley of Manley Labs got his start in home valve audio.

    One of the best jazz labels is the Italian label Black Saint.

    Check out Mapleshade Records - Jazz and Mapleshade Music - Blues .
    Last edited by Jabberwocky; 09-13-2014 at 02:57 PM.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Thanks, doc. I never thought about that. How many pressings did they allow before replacing a plate? (Which album did they start this with? "Pet Sounds"?)
    That's getting back there for my memory it was like 100,000 maybe more, they were still selling big then. As to when it might not of been until they went with Warner's. Capital had both Beach Boys and Beatles then were just too busy and too many pressing plant locations to commit to something like that. Also that is around the time vinyl got to be an issue too record companies were starting to use more recycled vinyl and in trying to increase profits were grinding up the whole record, label and all (the label area has the most vinyl). They had a process for trying to separate the paper dust from the vinyl but pieces of paper would still make it to a record. They also started make thinner and thinner records to save vinyl and why people use weight as a marking tool.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  9. #8

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    That is how vinyl got its bad rap. Paper dust, microscopic holes in too thin vinyl and an increasingly clueless public that wanted press n play. And worn-out stampers, I guess.

    Vinyl records were and are never meant for the uninitiated. Those who can be bothered to set it up right find out the real joys of analogue.

    The ears and the brain's pleasure centre don't lie.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jabberwocky View Post
    That is how vinyl got its bad rap. Paper dust, microscopic holes in too thin vinyl and an increasingly clueless public that wanted press n play. And worn-out stampers, I guess.

    Vinyl records were and are never meant for the uninitiated. Those who can be bothered to set it up right find out the real joys of analogue.

    The ears and the brain's pleasure centre don't lie.
    Here's one most don't know or want to know. I took a recording IAR recording class back then and part of the class covered vinyl records. Technically a vinyl record should not be played more than once every 24 hours. The needle going thru the groove is actually pushing the vinyl apart and the takes 24 hours for vinyl to fully return to original position.

    It was interesting learning about the RIAA curve and how Motown was very RIAA approved because they ignored the curve to boost the bass on their records. Groups trying to put more music on album than recommended meant shallower groove to increase usable space, but reduced audio quality. Then mastering for vinyl was such an art and most the time was not engineer who recorded the album. Which sometime was a problem because some record companies had staff mastering engineers who just mastered to so RIAA curve was addressed with no consideration for the album. Similar to today with CD's some are just a quick convert and move on.

    Personally I liked the old analog recordings properly transfer to CD. You had the warmth of the original tape recording, but the increased dynamic range and low end of digital.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  11. #10

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    Really enjoying this thread - so many diverse experiences with our members.

    My hifi set is an Arcam Alpha. Certainly not high end, but pretty good. That path would draw money from my guitar fund...

  12. #11

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    Yeah that is why diehard audiophiles have 2 copies or learnt the art of playing an album only once a day as it should be because all great things are transient, at least, for 24 hours.

    I like AAD CDs for the reasons docbop stated. The trouble with digital recording is that crucial ambient noise gets filtered out as 'noise'. This is the noise that gives the sense of space. We don't hear it but when it is missing we feel it and wonder why a recording sounds flat. On a good recording when a pianist steps on a pedal the room pressure changes and this is recorded on analogue equipment but not on digital. Theory says that digital is perfect but the ears hear things that are missing. I don't want to get into arguments with the Digital is Perfect crowd. For my own pleasure, distortion, groove noise, placebo effect and all, I will choose analogue recorded vinyl every time unless I can't.

    Perhaps I will fail a blind-test but ultimately like wine-buffs the only one I fool is myself and I quite enjoy it.

  13. #12

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    Sorry for dragging this on. The litmus test for verisimilitude is to play back a recording of a drum set and cymbals, a double bass or a sax or trumpet.

    The attack of a rim shot or the snap of a double bass or the reed of a sax or mouthpiece of trumpet shows up the difference between good analogue and good digital. While good digital sounds like a good recording of a drum kit good analogue sounds like a live kit is in the room with you.

    The leading edge and the trailing edge of a note is where digital falls flat.
    Last edited by Jabberwocky; 09-13-2014 at 05:02 PM.

  14. #13

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    Hmm. I didn't want this thread to be about Analogue versus Digital, but to celebrate vinyl. But don't let that stop you taking it wherever you want to.

    I love vinyl. I like the album covers. I like the sleeves. The soft thud as the needle finds the groove. Watching it go round and round. I don't get of that with a CD or download mp3. But I do have those too...

  15. #14

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    Funny that this topic came up as I just purchased a pre amp for my Dual CS 5000 turntable and man, what a pleasurable difference that made. Amazon is your friend in this case. Viva la Vinyl!



  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Hmm. I didn't want this thread to be about Analogue versus Digital, but to celebrate vinyl. But don't let that stop you taking it wherever you want to.

    I love vinyl. I like the album covers. I like the sleeves. The soft thud as the needle finds the groove. Watching it go round and round. I don't get of that with a CD or download mp3. But I do have those too...
    I miss the covers and liner notes too. I can watch a CD go around but at 300 RPM I get dizzy and fall over.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  17. #16

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    You know how everything is made in China now? And everything is low quality compared to the past? I wonder how this affects records being made?

  18. #17

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    Erm, not everything is made in China, and not everything is low quality. This record was made in Spain, and is very high quality. Good prices too.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobsguitars09 View Post
    You know how everything is made in China now? And everything is low quality compared to the past? I wonder how this affects records being made?
    Not everything made in China is low quality, they make high end products too it all depend on what the company contracting them wants. In my audio gig I had a couple years ago it was all ProTools DigiTech now Avid gear. We had a full Venue D-Show console same used in many large installations and touring audio companies. Also Digi audio interfaces, all of it designed in the US and manufactured in China.

    Other countries make quality products if that is what the contracting company wants.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  20. #19

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    For anyone interested in vinyl and high quality vinyl reissues, I've done business with this outfit in Salinas, Kansas and they have a boatload of pop, rock, jazz and classical reissues. One of the more interesting things they've been doing is reissuing albums in a 12 inch 45 RPM format for higher fidelity. They basically turn a single LP into a two LP set.

    Vinyl Records, SACDs, DVD Audio, Audiophile Equipment | Acoustic Sounds

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobsguitars09 View Post
    You know how everything is made in China now? And everything is low quality compared to the past? I wonder how this affects records being made?
    Like the upcoming iphone 6 and iphone 6 plus.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk View Post
    For anyone interested in vinyl and high quality vinyl reissues, I've done business with this outfit in Salinas, Kansas and they have a boatload of pop, rock, jazz and classical reissues. One of the more interesting things they've been doing is reissuing albums in a 12 inch 45 RPM format for higher fidelity. They basically turn a single LP into a two LP set.

    Vinyl Records, SACDs, DVD Audio, Audiophile Equipment | Acoustic Sounds
    Who is doing all this remastering with vinyl a lot of tweating is required so are the original artist, engineers, or producer involved? I thought maybe they were get the original masters and making new stampper's, but if going to 12" 45RPM that would require new master to make stampper's from.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by docbop View Post
    Who is doing all this remastering with vinyl a lot of tweating is required so are the original artist, engineers, or producer involved? I thought maybe they were get the original masters and making new stampper's, but if going to 12" 45RPM that would require new master to make stampper's from.
    They own their own pressing plant in Salinas. I would think that an eMail to them might get you the answers you're looking for.

    In the cases of Coltrane, Miles, Hendrix, half of The Beatles, Segovia, Zappa, Sinatra ad infinitum, the original artists are not going to have any input to the remix regardless of who reissues the album.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk View Post
    They own their own pressing plant in Salinas. I would think that an eMail to them might get you the answers you're looking for.

    In the cases of Coltrane, Miles, Hendrix, half of The Beatles, Segovia, Zappa, Sinatra ad infinitum, the original artists are not going to have any input to the remix regardless of who reissues the album.
    But for many parts of their engineering or production people are still around. What bothers me is I'm hearing tunes that are remastered from a modern audio POV, I'd rather hear how it was originally intended. But that's just me.

    I remember when CD caught on and lots of albums were being transfer to CD. A couple remastering engineers like the guy from Rhino became very well know and their work sought out, because they had reputation or just cleaning up what need to be tweaked and leaving as much alone as possible.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  25. #24

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    docbop,
    I remember the early days of horrible soundings CDs also. The people at Acoustic Sounds have been in the vinyl business for years selling quality used vinyl and new European and Japanese imports.

    I think they do what they do because they love analog audio.

    My initial dealings with them came from buying some high quality used LPs that were exactly as they described them. I'm just a satisfied customer passing along info for those who might be interested.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk View Post
    docbop,
    I remember the early days of horrible soundings CDs also. The people at Acoustic Sounds have been in the vinyl business for years selling quality used vinyl and new European and Japanese imports.

    I think they do what they do because they love analog audio.

    My initial dealings with them came from buying some high quality used LPs that were exactly as they described them. I'm just a satisfied customer passing along info for those who might be interested.
    That's cool I'm not commenting on a specific company, sorry it came off that way. I'm just throwing out things to think about when buying.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.