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  1. #1

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    i'm shopping for more music for my library. i value your opinions, so lets have them! thanks, jay

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    There are a lot of great ones, it would be disrespectful to the others to pick one.

    Try searching thru artist catalogues on your own, and reading reviews, and pick a few. You will probably learn a lot.

  4. #3

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    Jim Hall Live!
    Find your voice, and tell a story!

    Circle 'Round the Sun

  5. #4

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    kamlapati, thank you! thank you! thank you! how could i forget? i'm adding it to my cart!

  6. #5

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    stan. you're kidding. right?

  7. #6

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    i just checked out your web page. nice playing, nice guitar sounds. nice sounding family, as well. i'm checking out trenier guitars now because of your sound, thanks again. jay

  8. #7

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    Oscar Peterson's 1950s trios, with Ray Brown on bass, and Irving Ashby, Barney Kessel, or Herb Ellis on guitar.

    Not 50s-70s, but the Nat King Cole Trio with Oscar Moore (followed by Irving Ashby) in the 1940s is the one that influenced the others that followed.
    Richard

  9. #8

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    nice choices eddie lang. oscar moore was fantastic, but i'm not familiar with mr. ashby. i used to see herb ellis at a club called 'dante's' in n. hollywood when i lived there. monday night was guitar night. every monday, a different guitarist. i remember seeing mundell lowe, herb ellis, ron eschete, larry carlton. thanks for the memories. i wonder if there are any transcriptions of oscar's floating around the net? ever hear of any? cheers, jay

  10. #9

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    Wes Montgomery's A Dynamic New Sound. Organ trio, of course.

    Outatune: thanks for the props on my playing! (And my musical children!) Although I know that great sound can be had in many ways, I do count my blessings every morning when I play one of my Treniers.
    Find your voice, and tell a story!

    Circle 'Round the Sun

  11. #10

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    As they come to mind:
    The Trio - 'The Trio' (find it by searching for Billy Bean, Walter Norris and Hal Gaylor)
    Pat Metheny - 'Bright Size Life'
    The Jimmy Giuffre trios with Jim Hall
    Pat Martino/Gene Ludwig - 'Young Guns'
    Jack Wilkins - 'Windows'

    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  12. #11

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    Kenny Burrell's "All Night Long" was one of the very first live guitar trio recordings, and a great one, for sure. Charlie Byrd's trio stuff on Riverside is pretty nice, as were Bola Sete's early records. The Kessel-Brown-Manne Poll Winners series is excellent. John McLaughlin's "After The Rain" and "Live at Royal Festival Hall" are great, and "Princess Seta" by Dominique diPiazza with the phenomenal Nelson Veras on guitar is a special treat, very high-level playing and listening. The Red Norvo Trio with Jimmy Raney and Red Mitchell is superb. And finally, the "Gateway" records of John Abercrombie with Holland and DeJohnette are critical listening for post-bop styles. Along with the above-mentioned gems.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by outatune13 View Post
    nice choices eddie lang. oscar moore was fantastic, but i'm not familiar with mr. ashby. i used to see herb ellis at a club called 'dante's' in n. hollywood when i lived there. monday night was guitar night. every monday, a different guitarist. i remember seeing mundell lowe, herb ellis, ron eschete, larry carlton. thanks for the memories. i wonder if there are any transcriptions of oscar's floating around the net? ever hear of any? cheers, jay
    Wow! I would have love to have the possibility to see those guys on a regular basis.

    There was a folio of Moore's solos hanging around on ebay for a long time. NOS, not reprints. I don't see any now, but they do come up occasionnally. I do have it, but I have not yet spent any significant time with, so I cannot say how good it is.




    Moore was an important part of that trio. Each member was in fact an equal part of the trio. After Cole started singing, reluctantly at first, his popularity grew, as did the trio's. Eventually (and with some help from his entourage), Cole became convinced that his role was more important, and that the other two were more like sidemen and that they should be paid as such. That's when Moore left (after 10 years as part of the trio), to be replaced by Ashby in 1947.

    Ashby left the NKC trio in the early 50s to join briefly the Oscar Peterson Trio, the guitar replacing the drums in that combo. Peterson liked the result, and after Ashby left (to become mostly a studio musician), he was replaced by Kessel, and eventually Ellis.

    When Ashby left the NKCT to join OP, his replacement was the excellent John Collins, but in all his years with NKC, his role was pretty much to limited rhythm guitar.

    Moore was quite recognized during his 10 years part of the NKCT, and he was voted best jazz guitarist in the Downbeat poll for a few of those years. After he left, he played in a R&B group, and he only recorded a handful of jazz albums in the 50s and 60s. Sad, because he was one of the greats IMHO.


    In line Ronjazz' suggestion of DeJohnette/Holland/Abercrombie, the ECM label released around the same years a couple excellent albums of the trio composed of guitarist Terje Rypdal, bassist Miroslav Vitous, and drummer Jack DeJohnette.

    +1 David's suggestions of Billy Bean/Norris/Gaylor, and also the Giuffre3 (two horns and a guitar, how cooler can it be?).

    Another trio to look for could be the album "Something Tender", sax player Bud Freeman with guitarists George Barnes and Carl Kress.
    Richard

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Lang View Post
    Oscar Peterson's 1950s trios, with Ray Brown on bass, and Irving Ashby, Barney Kessel, or Herb Ellis on guitar.

    Not 50s-70s, but the Nat King Cole Trio with Oscar Moore (followed by Irving Ashby) in the 1940s is the one that influenced the others that followed.
    All great stuff. There's a nice compilation of the OP's historic Carnegie Hall concerts that features Barney Kessel on some tracks and Herb Ellis on others. Great, great stuff. I'm more into Herb, so I prefer those cuts, but Barney was great too.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  15. #14

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    thanks so much. i'm going to check these out. happy playing.

  16. #15

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    Wes and Jimmy Smth

    and

    Wes plus Trio - Smokin' at The Half Mote

  17. #16

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    And Kenny Burrell with Jimmy Smith

    Check out the three "Pollwinners" albums from the 50s-60s: Barney Kessel, Ray Brown, Shelley Manne; called the Pollwinners because each guy won the Downbeat poll on his respective instrument for so many years in a row. The albums are excellent--especially "Exploring the Scene."

    +1 on the OP Trio with Ellis--especially Live at the Shakespeare Festival

    +1 on the Jimmy Guiffre 3--especially "Travelin' Light" Jim Hall is a treasure.

  18. #17

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    I don't think anyone has ever gotten as "big" of a sound as Kessel in the guitar trio format, this one is my favorite.

  19. #18

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    Kessel's Gibson ES-350 that he modified with the old cobalt magnet Charlie Christian pickup is probably my favorite sounding jazz guitar of all time.

  20. #19

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    I'm partial to The Poll Winners and The Oscar Peterson Trio with Barney Kessel on guitar, but there were many great trios.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    Kessel's Gibson ES-350 that he modified with the old cobalt magnet Charlie Christian pickup is probably my favorite sounding jazz guitar of all time.
    Absolutely, the CC pu has not been excelled IMO.

    Louis Stewart gets a fantastic tone w/his modified 150 here too.


  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Painter View Post
    Absolutely, the CC pu has not been excelled IMO.

    Louis Stewart gets a fantastic tone w/his modified 150 here too.

    Don't forget Kenny Burrell's L5 with the CC in the early 60s, reportedly used on Midnight Blue and the Columbia recordings in the 60s.

    Here's some great Youtube vids of classic guitar trios by Kenny, Herb, and Barney:







    Would love to buy those videos on DVD for better audio and video quality if they were ever made available.

    I only got to seek Kenny with a quartet, but caught a practically empty Herb Ellis trio gig at Fat Tuesdays in NY back in the 1990s. Wish there were more records of him doing the guitar trio thing. Sadly missed Kessel, but he's one of my all time favorites along with Kenny and Grant Green and a master of the guitar trio format.

  23. #22

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    I never get tired of this track. Kenny's solo is tasty but the whole thing is spot on.
    There's a transcription of Kenny's solo floating around the Internet....

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  24. #23

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    Don't forget the Poll Winners! Kessel, Brown, and Manne. Great stuff. Kessel was fantastic

    Seeking beauty and truth through six strings.

  25. #24

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    Gosh...some of my favorite albums of all time. L5 with CC pickup on Midnight Blue? That explains a lot. I have always LOVED that tone. One of my early mentors on guitar played an old non-cut L5 with a CC--it sounded incredible. I had a chance to purchase it a dozen years ago, or so, for $3,000 and balked. I still cannot believe that I passed on what was an incredible memory for me.

    Stewart gets great tone from his 30s 150...the cutaway didn't saw off any of the tone.

    Exploring the Scene might be my favorite all-time jazz album.
    Last edited by Greentone; 09-02-2014 at 07:45 PM.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by outatune13 View Post
    nice choices eddie lang. oscar moore was fantastic, but i'm not familiar with mr. ashby. i used to see herb ellis at a club called 'dante's' in n. hollywood when i lived there. monday night was guitar night. every monday, a different guitarist. i remember seeing mundell lowe, herb ellis, ron eschete, larry carlton. thanks for the memories. i wonder if there are any transcriptions of oscar's floating around the net? ever hear of any? cheers, jay
    There are copies of the Oscar Moore books available online here:

    Oscar Moore Guitar Solos

    Oscar Moore Guitaristics

    But I'm not sure what the current situation is with accounts on scribd. You might want to check it out.
    Nat's trio with Oscar Moore or Irving Ashby made some of the most beautiful music ever, in my opinion. Check out their version of "Moonlight In Vermont"


    My personal favourite is The Red Norvo Trio with Tal Farlow on guitar and Charles Mingus on bass. They made some incredible recordings together, and were also really popular with the public. Tal's own drummerless trio records with Eddie Costa and Vinnie Burke are really something as well.Really a high point in Jazz guitar history.

  27. #26

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    Check out the Triple Scoop/Triple treat albums by Ray Brown, Herb Ellis and Monty Alexander

  28. #27

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    +1 on triple scoop/triple treat

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post

    Stewart gets great tone from his 30s 150...the cutaway didn't saw off any of the tone.
    When I was getting a CC pickup installed in my Loar by Dublin luthier and guitarist John Moriarty, I was asking him about genuine Gibson specs for the instrument. He told me that Es-150 was given to Louis by Bucky Pizzarelli. John had done some work on that guitar in the past. Wow. Sounds great.

  30. #29

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    Great. One of my favorite guitars from one of my favorite guitarists. Thanks for the tidbit.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Para View Post
    Check out the Triple Scoop/Triple treat albums by Ray Brown, Herb Ellis and Monty Alexander
    This thread is turning into a great resource! I'd never heard this stuff before. While searching Google Music for it, I found another called "Straight Ahead" by Alexander, Brown, and Ellis (listed under Alexander). All fantastic records and I'm now more of an Ellis fan than before.
    Find your voice, and tell a story!

    Circle 'Round the Sun

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by kamlapati View Post
    Jim Hall Live!
    And Jim Hall Live Vols 2-4, released a couple of years ago and recorded at the same gigs (a 2 week stretch, IIRC) at Bourbon Street in Toronto. Bassist Don Thompson did the recordings, basically just turning the machine on and letting it run. The new volumes are beautifully mastered and the playing is Jim Hall at one of his creative peaks with Thompson and drummer Terry Clarke being right there every beat. Superb ensemble playing and my favorite jazz guitar recordings.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by kamlapati View Post
    This thread is turning into a great resource! I'd never heard this stuff before. While searching Google Music for it, I found another called "Straight Ahead" by Alexander, Brown, and Ellis (listed under Alexander). All fantastic records and I'm now more of an Ellis fan than before.
    There was also the "Soft Winds" trio that Herb played in during the 40's. I've only ever heard a couple of tunes by them on the Properbox " Hittin' On All Six" box, but nice guit/pno/bass trio.
    It seems there is a CD which contains some radio transcriptions from the 40's combined with some new tracks cut by the same group in '95. The piano player, Louis Frigo, plays violin on all the newer cuts.

    Here's the amazon link.

    Amazon.com: Frigo, John/herb Ellis/cart Soft Winds -then And Now- Other Swing: Music

  34. #33

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    I always understood that Soft Winds was Herb Ellis guitar, Lou Carter piano and John Frigo violin. John Frigo was also a bass player so perhaps he played bass.

    "Pianist Lou Carter told journalist Robert Dupuis in a 1996 interview, "The Dorsey band had a six-week hole in the schedule. The three of us had played together some with the big band. John Frigo, who had already left the band, knew the owner of the Peter Stuyvesant Hotel in Buffalo. We went in there and stayed six months. And that's how the group the Soft Winds were born." Together with Frigo and Lou Carter, Ellis wrote the classic jazz standard "Detour Ahead". The Soft Winds group was fashioned after the Nat King Cole Trio. They stayed together until 1952. Ellis then joined the Oscar Peterson Trio (replacing Barney Kessell) in 1953, forming what Scott Yanow would later on refer to as "one of the most memorable of all the piano, guitar, and bass trios in jazz history".
    Last edited by Para; 09-04-2014 at 02:01 PM.

  35. #34

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    Sorry all. My mistake, Thanks Para, you're absolutely correct. John Frigo plays bass and violin.

  36. #35

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    "The Triple Treat Blues," courtesy of Monty Alexander, Ray Brown, and Herb Ellis.



    I hadn't heard of these records before. Thanks for mentioning 'em, guys!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  37. #36

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    As a special treat, I received Triple Treat from Herb for my 30th birthday. ;-)

  38. #37

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    Concord Jazz Guitar Collection by Jimmy Bruno, Howard Alden, and Frank Vignola.

    Shivers by New Guitar Summit (Duke Robillard, Jay Geils, Gerry Beaudoin)

    btw, I realize these aren't from the 50's - 70's, but they are very good.
    Last edited by snoskier63; 09-05-2014 at 08:07 AM.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greentone View Post
    As a special treat, I received Triple Treat from Herb for my 30th birthday. ;-)
    That would probably be the highlight of my life. I did get some instruction and advice from him once many years ago.

  40. #39

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    Jimmy Raney and Hank Garland.......