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  1. #1

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    Effortless Ear Training - Fretboard Anatomy

    The course above is what I am eyeing on taking. I just want to know if the promises made in this website are all true or just marketing speak?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    While there is the extreme remote possibility that their curriculum is as transformative as they say, the ad is all hype and offers close to zero info about their approach.

  4. #3

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    I have no experience with this program, but it certainly sounds promising and the guy appears to have been in business since at least 2013 and is a professional misician. Also found his review of the new sølo app interesting - I got this app when it came out last month and highly recommend it (not as diligent in using it as I should be, but finding it really valuable).
    Should You Buy Tom Quayle's Solo App? - Fretboard Anatomy

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by v281
    I have no experience with this program, but it certainly sounds promising and the guy appears to have been in business since at least 2013 and is a professional misician. Also found his review of the new sølo app interesting - I got this app when it came out last month and highly recommend it (not as diligent in using it as I should be, but finding it really valuable).
    Should You Buy Tom Quayle's Solo App? - Fretboard Anatomy
    This solo app is an answer to my prayers. Thanks!

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by v281
    I have no experience with this program, but it certainly sounds promising and the guy appears to have been in business since at least 2013 and is a professional misician. Also found his review of the new sølo app interesting - I got this app when it came out last month and highly recommend it (not as diligent in using it as I should be, but finding it really valuable).
    Should You Buy Tom Quayle's Solo App? - Fretboard Anatomy
    As a struggling and failing improviser, I do need this supplementary drill/app that gives me a break from actual jamming and allow me to explore chord tones and scales in a logical manner that’s fun and engaging.

  7. #6

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    Functional Ear training app is great

  8. #7

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    I don't want to go the ear training rabbit hole or get myself in trouble talking too much ear training as... I promised I wouldn't.

    Ear training should be contextual. Ear training should go well beyond naked intervals. Ear training should involve singing... A LOT of singing. Ear training should loop in with what you are practicing on the guitar--they are NOT separate studies.

    I love the stuff over at Muse-eek dot com. Bruce Arnold was a star disciple of Charlie Banacos. Honestly, the ONLY name you really have to know for all things musicianship--including ear training-- is Charlie Banacos.

    But... you don't need to download or purchase programs to get actual FUNCTIONAL ear training. Nope.

    All you need is an intune guitar or piano, and your voice.

    Here's an ear training exercise that will give you LOADS more use than identifying intervals or sight singing randomly.

    Take a song that you are learning on the guitar.

    Sing the melody. Play the root movement of the guitar.

    Now... change registers if you need/ maybe move the key signature up or down and...

    Sing the root movement and play the melody on the guitar.

    Next up. Practicing vocabulary.

    Sing the root movement and play your favorite ii V lick.

    Next, SLOWLY but IN TIME sing the lick and play the root movement on your guitar.

    Ear training should work with your instrument. Wholistically. Ear training is NOT just notes. It's harmony. It's rhythm and groove. It's getting a feel for meter. You should always use your ears no matter what you are learning or doing on your instrument. Ear training is not a separate entity. That's the trick that many programs fail to share.

    You play a scale on your guitar -- you are ear training

    You play a rhythm and work it into your comping -- you are training your ears

    You practice arpeggios on the guitar -- you are ear training

    You practice solo'ing and targeting certain colors -- you are training your ears

    Never shut off your ears. If you shut off your ears, than what ever you pluck outta your guitar isn't worth the air that it pushes.

    There. Done. No more posting about ear training from me. But that's the truth. You play music, you play sound, you use your ears in varying capacities.

    I love ear training, but I know it all has to work together--or it's ain't doing me any good. Ear training shouldn't be seen as a parlor trick. I mean... a parlor room is just for sitting around and talking--and being passive. Ear training is for the office--it's where you do the all the work. I think I lost the analogy here, but I think I got the point across.
    Last edited by PickingMyEars; 02-28-2021 at 11:58 PM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    I don't want to go the ear training rabbit hole or get myself in trouble talking too much ear training as... I promised I wouldn't.

    Ear training should be contextual. Ear training should go well beyond naked intervals. Ear training should involve singing... A LOT of singing. Ear training should loop in with what you are practicing on the guitar--they are NOT separate studies.

    I love the stuff over at Muse-eek dot com. Bruce Arnold was a star disciple of Charlie Banacos. Honestly, the ONLY name you really have to know for all things musicianship--including ear training-- is Charlie Banacos.

    But... you don't need to download or purchase programs to get actual FUNCTIONAL ear training. Nope.

    All you need is an intune guitar or piano, and your voice.

    Here's an ear training exercise that will give you LOADS more use than identifying intervals or sight singing randomly.

    Take a song that you are learning on the guitar.

    Sing the melody. Play the root movement of the guitar.

    Now... change registers if you need/ maybe move the key signature up or down and...

    Sing the root movement and play the melody on the guitar.

    Next up. Practicing vocabulary.

    Sing the root movement and play your favorite ii V lick.

    Next, SLOWLY but IN TIME sing the lick and play the root movement on your guitar.

    Ear training should work with your instrument. Wholistically. Ear training is NOT just notes. It's harmony. It's rhythm and groove. It's getting a feel for meter. You should always use your ears no matter what you are learning or doing on your instrument. Ear training is not a separate entity. That's the trick that many programs fail to share.

    You play a scale on your guitar -- you are ear training

    You play a rhythm and work it into your comping -- you are training your ears

    You practice arpeggios on the guitar -- you are ear training

    You practice solo'ing and targeting certain colors -- you are training your ears

    Never shut off your ears. If you shut off your ears, than what ever you pluck outta your guitar isn't worth the air that it pushes.

    There. Done. No more posting about ear training from me. But that's the truth. You play music, you play sound, you use your ears in varying capacities.

    I love ear training, but I know it all has to work together--or it's ain't doing me any good. Ear training shouldn't be seen as a parlor trick. I mean... a parlor room is just for sitting around and talking--and being passive. Ear training is for the office--it's where you do the all the work. I think I lost the analogy here, but I think I got the point across.
    Having been a student of Charlie Banacos for three years, what you suggest is nothing like how he taught me. He would play II V I in the key of C on his piano then strike a note. I would have to name that note. This would progress over the years to include intervals all the way through 4 note chords. I never got beyond intervals. There was a student that I witnessed name a god awful chord voicing by note. It was like a D7 built as 3 b7 #13 b15 something crazy like one of his famous voicings with no root, 7th, etc. The student didn't even have to think first, he just rattled of the notes. Charlie turns and says to me, see I told you it wasn't that hard Man, you just need to practice Man, I miss CB

  10. #9

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    What I suggested wasn't a Charlie Banacos exercise, exactly.

    I was trying to make a point about ear training being more holistic and applied to what you are currently studying on the guitar. That ear training goes well beyond identifying naked intervals out of context.

    I know those exercises you mentioned well. Bruce Arnold took me through them when I studied with him in NYC. Still wish I could have even done a cassette tape correspondence with Charlie but I was born a wee bit too late Bruce is a nice guy, and I like how he digitized Charlie's pedagogy.

    I do have friends that studied with Charlie in person. We have a couple here on the forum that knew Charlie quite well--like you (I'm honestly jealous). Wish I met him, but the legacy Charlie Banacos left... that's what ear training SHOULD be. Not this instant gratification type stuff that passes for ear training these days

    Okay, no more ear training posts from me. I want to show what ear training DID for me. What it continues to add to my studies. But I want to show that through the actual playing I post on the forum. I did the essay route years ago... that doesn't work

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by PickingMyEars
    What I suggested wasn't a Charlie Banacos exercise, exactly.

    I was trying to make a point about ear training being more holistic and applied to what you are currently studying on the guitar. That ear training goes well beyond identifying naked intervals out of context.

    I know those exercises you mentioned well. Bruce Arnold took me through them when I studied with him in NYC. Still wish I could have even done a cassette tape correspondence with Charlie but I was born a wee bit too late Bruce is a nice guy, and I like how he digitized Charlie's pedagogy.

    I do have friends that studied with Charlie in person. We have a couple here on the forum that knew Charlie quite well--like you (I'm honestly jealous). Wish I met him, but the legacy Charlie Banacos left... that's what ear training SHOULD be. Not this instant gratification type stuff that passes for ear training these days

    Okay, no more ear training posts from me. I want to show what ear training DID for me. What it continues to add to my studies. But I want to show that through the actual playing I post on the forum. I did the essay route years ago... that doesn't work
    I apologize if I said anything wrong. My intention wasn't to discredit your method. I do understand what you were saying and at first I didn't think of it as Ear Training. My Bad. After I posted my last response I remembered how CB would have me learn a tune. All root notes then 3rd, 5th, 7th, and all extensions. It really did help you to Hear the Harmony/Melody, not to mention learning all the notes that make up a chord. That's also ear training. If it was easy, everyone could do it!

    If you or anyone else is interested, Garry Dial is doing Charlies correspondence lessons with the Blessings of the Banacos family.

    Charlie Banacos Online jazz correspondence Lessons

  12. #11

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    I know nothing of this course.

    A couple years ago I took a Ear training / Sight Singing course at out local community college. It was very good.

    There was a young girl ( there all young cause I'm old ) in the class that couldn't sing the pitch played on the piano, and couldn't tell if a note was higher or lower when we started. By the time the course was over she could sing and recognize intervals, not great mind you but a huge improvement.

    Nothing beats in person training. Check out your nearest community college that offers music you won't be sorry.

  13. #12

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    Anything with 'Effortless' in the name instantly makes me suspicious.