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  1. #1

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    3:22

    I got F - Cdim - C6

    Am I right?

    Thanks in advance.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Yes.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by M-ster View Post
    Yes.
    It's not a C dim...It's a G9b13 with the root and 5th omitted.

  5. #4

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    It's three triads - F, Ebo** and C. The top notes go F - Eb - E.

    So an octave down (on a guitar, no doubled notes):

    xx756x
    xx424x
    xx555x

    ** or F#, A, C dim, at least technically. I don't hear the bass C when she plays it.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1 View Post
    It's three triads - F, Ebo** and C. The top notes go F - Eb - E.

    So an octave down (on a guitar, no doubled notes):

    xx756x
    xx424x
    xx555x

    ** or F#, A, C dim, at least technically. I don't hear the bass C when she plays it.
    I don't hear the C bass either. Also I don't hear the Gb of the Eb dim, I am hearing more of the the 7th or F of G9b13. I take jazz piano lessons. It's common for jazz pianists to play a dominant chord using only the 3rd and 7th with alterations of the 9th and 13th and the root and 5th omitted.

  7. #6

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    ... or maybe F - G#7 - C and a C6(add9) based. This was maybe a more common notation in pop music than in jazz.

  8. #7

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    "I think she's only playing two notes in octaves. The original hasn't got any other notes in it. That becomes more obvious in the last clip. " ragman

    Yes, R. That ending is a tired cliche in Jazz Music. . . it is ubiquitous. Good playing . . . Marinero

  9. #8

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    The first chord is an F7

    RH notes played:

    The top note is C, played with the RH pinkie, and this identical note is repeated throughout all 3 chords.

    The note beneath this C, an F, creates a perfect 5th interval with the C above it.

    This right hand thumb is the only note of the right hand that moves for each of the 3 chords.

    Left hand notes:

    Like the top note C in the right hand, another constant note struck in all 3 chords is the note A played in the thumb of the left hand. Forming a b6 interval beneath the right hand F above it. Typically for an F7 chord an Eb would be played in the left hand pinkie as the bottom note ( forming a tritone) and a left hand rootless voicing.

    Even without any chord embellishments this first chord still sounds fine because this F will step down the interval of a 2nd to the D# of the next chord.

    The second chord is a B7b9

    Pianists often slide up to the black keys using their thumb. Notice on the second chord she's sliding up to catch the D# with her right hand thumb.

    With repeating the top note, C in her right hand, the D# forms a 6th interval beneath the top note C of the right hand. This repeated C becomes the b9 of the second chord B7b9.

    Hear how the note A, repeated now for a second time, played in the left hand thumb forms a tritone with the D# above it.

    The third chord is a CMaj6

    The top note C, struck now for a third time, the D# beneath this C comes forward a half step and strikes the E, the third of the CMaj chord. The repeated note A in the left hand, now struck for a 3rd time, becomes the 6th of the CMaj.

    Like guitarists, pianists also strive for economy of movement and solid voice leading. And yes, this is an old cliche ending with the typical C Octaves played as the end notes of the right hand..

    And yes, if you ever want a long winded answer, ask a piano player, for they don't know when to stop soloing.
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  10. #9

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    reading your our pno description I just found this

    xxx10 10 8
    xxx 8 10 8
    xxx 9 10 8

    only one note moves , nice
    many thanks 2bop

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    The first chord is an F7

    RH notes played:

    The top note is C, played with the RH pinkie, and this identical note is repeated throughout all 3 chords.

    The note beneath this C, an F, creates a perfect 5th interval with the C above it.

    This right hand thumb is the only note of the right hand that moves for each of the 3 chords.

    Left hand notes:

    Like the top note C in the right hand, another constant note struck in all 3 chords is the note A played in the thumb of the left hand. Forming a b6 interval beneath the right hand F above it. Typically for an F7 chord an Eb would be played in the left hand pinkie as the bottom note ( forming a tritone) and a left hand rootless voicing.

    Even without any chord embellishments this first chord still sounds fine because this F will step down the interval of a 2nd to the D# of the next chord.

    The second chord is a B7b9

    Pianists often slide up to the black keys using their thumb. Notice on the second chord she's sliding up to catch the D# with her right hand thumb.

    With repeating the top note, C in her right hand, the D# forms a 6th interval beneath the top note C of the right hand. This repeated C becomes the b9 of the second chord B7b9.

    Hear how the note A, repeated now for a second time, played in the left hand thumb forms a tritone with the D# above it.

    The third chord is a CMaj6

    The top note C, struck now for a third time, the D# beneath this C comes forward a half step and strikes the E, the third of the CMaj chord. The repeated note A in the left hand, now struck for a 3rd time, becomes the 6th of the CMaj.

    Like guitarists, pianists also strive for economy of movement and solid voice leading. And yes, this is an old cliche ending with the typical C Octaves played as the end notes of the right hand..

    And yes, if you ever want a long winded answer, ask a piano player, for they don't know when to stop soloing.

    Hi, B,
    You're making it more difficult than it is. This was a standard big band ending for greats like Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, etc. It's also used widely in Classical music. In key of B flat it would be played: 1st position F chord(octaves only-4th and 1st string) then, 5th position A(octaves only-4th and 1st string), then 6th position B flat(octaves only-4th and 1st string). When I use this cliche, I usually give it a little more interest by ending it in the first position with B flat 1st finger 5th string/F natural 4th string 3rd position and B flat 3rd string 3rd position--Root and Major 5th. So, its: B flat/F natural/B flat. Try it. It works. Good playing . . . Marinero

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Hi, B,
    You're making it more difficult than it is. This was a standard big band ending for greats like Count Basie, Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, etc. It's also used widely in Classical music. In key of B flat it would be played: 1st position F chord(octaves only-4th and 1st string) then, 5th position A(octaves only-4th and 1st string), then 6th position B flat(octaves only-4th and 1st string). When I use this cliche, I usually give it a little more interest by ending it in the first position with B flat 1st finger 5th string/F natural 4th string 3rd position and B flat 3rd string 3rd position--Root and Major 5th. So, its: B flat/F natural/B flat. Try it. It works. Good playing . . . Marinero
    Hi Marinero! So you're suggesting the 3 chords are? Bb F Bb?
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    Hi Marinero! So you're suggesting the 3 chords are? Bb F Bb?
    Hi, B,
    They would be F major-1st position/A major-5th position/B flat Major-6th position and then to B flat major-1st position played on strings 5, 4 and 3. I hope this helps. Good playing . . . Marinero

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero View Post
    Hi, B,
    They would be F major-1st position/A major-5th position/B flat Major-6th position and then to B flat major-1st position played on strings 5, 4 and 3. I hope this helps. Good playing . . . Marinero
    How are you Marinero!

    So you're hearing the band playing the above tune in Bb?
    They're actually playing the tune in C Major, or A minor if you wish.
    This is the most common key for the tune. Frank Sinatra and Basie also did it in the same key, C Major.
    Hear how Basie, backing Frank, ends the tune with the same CMaj 6.

    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    How are you Marinero!

    So you're hearing the band playing the above tune in Bb?
    They're actually playing the tune in C Major, or A minor if you wish.
    This is the most common key for the tune. Frank Sinatra and Basie also did it in the same key, C Major.
    Hear how Basie, backing Frank, ends the tune with the same CMaj 6.

    No, I didnt pay attention to the key . . . only the sequence: I/V/VI/VI Sorry! Good playing . . Marinero

  16. #15

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    No problem Marinero. So to the OP, this ending is commonly known as the "Count Basie ending."

    As played by the piano in the above video:

    an A pedal is played repeatedly beneath 3 chords.

    First we have F/A. Over that A pedal tone the piano is playing notes FC, in that order.

    Next is Adim7. Notes A C Eb Gb. The piano right hand slides to Eb Gb C in the right hand.

    The final chord is C6/A. On the piano the right hand slides down to EC, or notes E G C if you prefer, over the A pedal.

    See minute 4:30 of this video

    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  17. #16

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    So in essence the OP's original suggestion in the form of F/A Cdim7/A CMaj6/A works!
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    So in essence the OP's original suggestion in the form of F/A Cdim7/A CMaj6/A works!
    Hi, B,
    I like simple. Beginning with C, the sequence is C/E/F played in octaves for the guitar. Then, if you want, follow F on the next beat with with F octave chord played an octave down. This is where some sheet music would make it very simple. Or, starting with F, the sequence is F/A/B flat then the B flat octave chord played an octave down for the ending as I described in detail. You get the sound you want with very simple playing. Good playing . . . Marinero

  19. #18

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    It's such a Basie cliche, that it's known as the Basie ending.




  20. #19

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    Hi, B,
    Do you think the Count knew Matteo Carcassi(1792-1853)? Here's Edson Lopes playing Estudio No. 14, Opus 60 from Carcassi's "The Essential Studies." In measure 32, Carcassi plays the Count's ending at .51 minutes. Maybe we can have a contest and see how far back in musical history this goes? Enjoy.
    Good playing . . . Marinero

  21. #20

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    Hi Marinero! There's no contest. Basie's sounds way cooler!

    Me, I'm just happy that at my age my ear can still pick out the proper notes. Having a digital piano helped, even though the piano in the video was tuned a half step higher.
    "You've got to be in the sun to feel the sun. It's that way with music too." - Sidney Bechet