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  1. #1
    Hey all. This is my first post here! If this belongs somewhere else, please let me know. If this was made against the rules of the forum, please please please let me know.

    I've recently invented(?) a new method for notating stringed instrument music, basically blending tablature and the staff, but doing a little more than that. I'm just going to post the pictures of prototypings I've made so far, with no explanation, and some links to posts elsewhere with brief text explanations. I'm interested in gauging people's responses to this thing I've come up with. What do y'all think?

    Cheers!

    New Guitar Notation Method-fring-guide-using-c-major-triad-quarter-notes-fring-position-1-png
    New Guitar Notation Method-c-major-triad-quarter-notes-fring-position-2-png
    New Guitar Notation Method-6-string-c-major-chord-first-position-fring-notation-png
    New Guitar Notation Method-middle-c-5th-string-half-note-jpg
    New Guitar Notation Method-c-major-triad-first-position-fring-indicators-png

    Links to other posts I've made about this with some text explanations:
    https://instagram.com/p/BxNbzDTnUoY/
    https://instagram.com/p/BxaRZl2ncSq/
    https://instagram.com/p/BxuwXlunLav/
    https://instagram.com/p/Bx_UYCFHoE0/
    https://instagram.com/p/ByeL28Fniov/
    https://instagram.com/p/BzJtcWinGE7/
    Last edited by tyler.billman.guitar; 06-26-2019 at 11:44 PM. Reason: Forgot to add links I said I would add!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Looks like a good idea but I'm afraid that it would be quite hard to read when you print this in a size that would fit a printed page properly...
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A long journey starts with the first step...and although I have long forgotten about my destination I'm still enjoying the journey.

  4. #3

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    What if my fingering preference is not the same as yours? Call me a curmudgeon, but I prefer just standard notation, which is hard enough without trying to read something so tiny. Two numbers inside a note, at the size necessary, is nearly impossible to read. You cannot expect to use music printed at the size you have in your post. Even on a computer, tablet, or phone, it's not likely to be usable. But maybe it will catch on with someone.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Looks like it might be useful for people learning to read music
    White belt
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  6. #5

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    How do you indicate what finger to use, when to barre, when to hold onto and release a fretted note?

    I also think the notation is unwieldy.
    Build bridges, not walls.

  7. #6

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    and where does it tell me how to sit and what strings to use?
    White belt
    My Youtube

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Good idea ,but it might be too small for so many informations.
    Maybe you can improve it from our comments...
    Uffe Steen Music: http://www.uffe-steen.dk

  9. #8

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    I first learned how to read music from studying the piano as an 8 year old. As you already know, there's a lot of reading between the upper G clef and the lower Bass clef, plus learning what register to begin the piece in. Then there was the trumpet, trombone, bugle, all before starting the guitar. There is no TAB for any of those instruments. Learning to read music notation is way easier than learning to read and understand TAB. It takes a little time and effort, but it's not the big bad monster that some want to believe. I commend you on your efforts to make learning to read easier for those looking to learn, but, I don't think it gets any easier than the Mel Bay series, or the William Levitt Berklee books etc. Like combining Notation with Tab, I feel your method would be just as slow and confusing to learn at a reasonable rate. I took 10 years off from playing. When I picked up the guitar again for the first time, I opened up my Real Book to Alice in Wonderland and started playing again. I remembered how to read. After, I looked at TAB in a guitar magazine and I was like, wtf is this? I couldn't remember what most of it was. Just like learning to master a song. Learn to read notation and you'll never forget it.

  10. #9

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    Clever idea, but as others said, those numbers would have to be so small.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  11. #10
    Woah! So this is cool, seeing all these replies... I tried replying to each topic that y'all have brought up so far...



    Quote Originally Posted by TOMMO View Post
    Looks like a good idea but I'm afraid that it would be quite hard to read when you print this in a size that would fit a printed page properly...
    This is not really a problem, if you ask me. The standards for printing size need not be standards. You and others stating this are right, given the most commonly used sizes for stave-systems and noteheads. I don't believe this is a serious roadblock though!


    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell View Post
    What if my fingering preference is not the same as yours? Call me a curmudgeon, but I prefer just standard notation, which is hard enough without trying to read something so tiny. Two numbers inside a note, at the size necessary, is nearly impossible to read. You cannot expect to use music printed at the size you have in your post. Even on a computer, tablet, or phone, it's not likely to be usable. But maybe it will catch on with someone.
    This notation does not indicate fingering preference! It is open to interpretation. It is meant to be used to communicate specific fretting information, which is very important for guitar. If you prefer to fret certain chords in certain ways, then there's no reason you can't do that on your own! No piece of sheet music is law or unchangeable.

    And as I'm sure most of you know, some notes are playable in 5+ different locations, and for a learning sight-reader/guitarist, this can present a serious challenge. I believe this notation method presents a significant solution to that challenge! I also believe there are people out there that will love to use this. Especially guitarists who understand tablature very well, but who are intimidated by or do not understand learning to read the classical staff. Notating specifically where to play what notes can help smooth out the process of learning to read the staff, according to my theories at least.


    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Looks like it might be useful for people learning to read music
    This is where I think this method can excel. It reminds me of a guitar/stringed instrument specific "EZ Play Today" notation.


    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles View Post
    How do you indicate what finger to use, when to barre, when to hold onto and release a fretted note?

    I also think the notation is unwieldy.
    One of the interesting things about this method is that it augments the existing field of guitar notation without making prior innovations unuseable. For those who want such specific and precise information as which finger to use where, barring, etc., the classical fingering notation may be employed together with this! Thence making it possible now to indicate the fret, string, fingers to use, plectrum to use, and all other manner of musical instructions, without printing both a classical staff-system AND and tablature staff-system on the same page. And because of this, I believe it wouldn't be too unwieldy to print the new method at a slightly larger size, to make reading the numbering system (when needed) easier.


    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    and where does it tell me how to sit and what strings to use?
    Now that's some avant-garde music notation!


    Quote Originally Posted by Strbender View Post
    I first learned how to read music from studying the piano as an 8 year old. As you already know, there's a lot of reading between the upper G clef and the lower Bass clef, plus learning what register to begin the piece in. Then there was the trumpet, trombone, bugle, all before starting the guitar. There is no TAB for any of those instruments. Learning to read music notation is way easier than learning to read and understand TAB. It takes a little time and effort, but it's not the big bad monster that some want to believe. I commend you on your efforts to make learning to read easier for those looking to learn, but, I don't think it gets any easier than the Mel Bay series, or the William Levitt Berklee books etc. Like combining Notation with Tab, I feel your method would be just as slow and confusing to learn at a reasonable rate. I took 10 years off from playing. When I picked up the guitar again for the first time, I opened up my Real Book to Alice in Wonderland and started playing again. I remembered how to read. After, I looked at TAB in a guitar magazine and I was like, wtf is this? I couldn't remember what most of it was. Just like learning to master a song. Learn to read notation and you'll never forget it.
    Thanks for sharing your perspective! If you feel like there's a "truth" in your post here that applies to "all" guitarists, I would recommend you check out how many guitarists across all skill levels and levels of dedication, professionalism, etc. read the staff exclusively versus tablature exclusively. There's a reason most guitar magazines use it to show their readers riffs... And a reason Ultimate-guitar.com is so huge... And a reason that people all over the Internet and elsewhere are constantly asking for tabs of songs...

    ...Not to imply that this is good for guitarists wishing to be more complete musicians. Which is why I think bringing these things together onto the page as I have shown is possible could really help a lot of folks who are feeling stuck!