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  1. #1

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    I'm really digging Conti's series. There are a bunch of good study groups going on here, so I am not alone. What I think really makes them great is that RC basicly does a guided "transcription". He leads you through his solo bar for bar demonstrating it, talking about what he was thinking, showing the triads and scalar runs, etc.

    Yes, yes. There is someone reading this right now vein bulging on forehead, eyes twitching, fingers practically vibrating over the keyboard to tell me that "real" jazz players don't need no friggin "guided" transcription. They learned solos walking chest deep in snow uphill --both ways!!!-- while playing an old stump strung with razor wire they stole from the neighbors feedlot. Duly noted, and I am truly humbled.

    Now, back to the point....

    I've learned a lot from doing Conti's solos. But I don't love them as music. Sorry Bob. I know your assistant monitors this forum. You are a monster player, and even better teacher. But the solo's are just not what I would want to play.

    So, is there another enterprising player who does a similar video lesson on a solo, breaking it down bar for bar? Jens Larson, maybe? I'm ready to start on something new, but I just don't want another Conti solo. I know the Rayney/Abersold books do solos, but they lack that guided aspect that makes Conti so special.

    Any suggestions for other DVD's or online courses that do something similar?

    Thanks!

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    You might want to check out "The Jazz Science Series" by Warren Nunes and Steven Crowell.

    Each volume is a book with a DVD and a play-along CD that has a unique approach to soloing that combines arpeggios and scales into one thought.

    Here's the link to the Steven Crowell page on the Chord Melody Guitar Music website that has lots of video clips from the series.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    The Jazz Science Series

  4. #3

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    Thanks! I’ll check those out.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  5. #4

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    Sheryl Bailey has some good courses through Truefire. She performs a solo over the changes to a well-known standard and then breaks it down for you.

    Bebop Etudes:
    Essentials: Bebop Etudes - Sheryl Bailey - TrueFire

    Bebop Blues Etudes:
    Bebop Blues Etudes - Guitar Lessons - Sheryl Bailey - TrueFire

    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  6. #5

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    Here's an example:




    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  7. #6

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    London Jazz Guitar Society:
    www.meetup.com/londonjazzguitarsociety
    LJGS on Twitter: www.twitter.com/LDNJazzGuitar

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by David B View Post
    Sheryl Bailey has some good courses through Truefire. She performs a solo over the changes to a well-known standard and then breaks it down for you.

    Bebop Etudes:
    Essentials: Bebop Etudes - Sheryl Bailey - TrueFire

    Bebop Blues Etudes:
    Bebop Blues Etudes - Guitar Lessons - Sheryl Bailey - TrueFire
    Those are great! Don’t know how I missed them. For some reason I thought she was just teaching comping over those progressions.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

  9. #8

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    Interesting thread. Seems like many folks are looking for the one ultimate source for learning jazz and improvising their own jazz lines. Because everyone tends to learn in their own unique way, the absolute source doesn't exist. That said, here's my own reflection on using the Conti solos effectively.

    The first point is that Conti teaches jazz by having the students get right to playing jazz "lines" (his Source Code book on Jazz Lines) and his Solos. Here he employs lines that conceptually come from the same sources as Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery, Charlie Parker, Pat Martino, George Benson, etc. used. So, the pedigree of his materials is great. In presenting the material, a teacher can approach it one of two ways - either "talk" about or "play" and demonstrate. My experience has shown me that the sooner that you get to "playing" the material the better - because you are simultaneously developing aural recognition, technical fluency, and vocabulary development. This holistic approach is very effective.

    The second point (that is often overlooked) with Conti's materials are that they provide lines that are "seeds" for further development. When I have students learn a Conti line or solo, they play it "just as is" for quite a while and learn to insert these phrases, verbatim, into standard repertoire. Sort of like cut and paste. But, what happens next is the key here: the students unconsciously start to modify these lines, and their own "take" on the lines become "their" vocabulary. This is very exciting to witness because it is the "birth" of an individual voice and style. I have literally seen this with hundreds of students that have faithfully followed this path

    Point three - Conti's TTI solos are very basic and accessible, yet cover the foundational aspects of his approach. It is REALLY difficult for a teacher to "write/improvise" entry-level lines that a) accomplish the task, and b) sound relatively hip. I believe that Conti's TTI lines do that. Students could be pretty intimidated by trying to learn some of his "Smoking Lineman®" solos right off the bat - that's why he developed the TTI series (I think). So, in response to the comment, about not exactly digging the early Conti solos, I would suggest that it is time to graduate to his Smoking Lineman series. Sounds like you are ready.

    I am not dissing anybody else's approach (Sheryl's is really good although it deals with a lot of theory information). I am encouraging folks to dig a little deeper into Conti's stuff. There is more there than you might realize! Just sayin'.

  10. #9

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    Thanks, y'all.
    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  11. #10

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    Frank Vignola's TrueFire channel is fantastic. I've have gotten rid of many of my jazz theory type books and instead I am concentrating on learning actual lines from great players. To that end I recently re-discovered these two books on my library shelf. Both chock full of great jazz lines:

    https://www.amazon.com/Best-Jazz-Gui...s=books&sr=1-1

    https://www.amazon.com/Jazz-Guitar-Etudes-Greg-Fishman/dp/0976615371









  12. #11

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    Gotta check out Frank Vignola's Truefire courses....
    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mjirish View Post
    The first point is that Conti teaches jazz by having the students get right to playing jazz "lines" (his Source Code book on Jazz Lines) and his Solos. Here he employs lines that conceptually come from the same sources as Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery, Charlie Parker, Pat Martino, George Benson, etc. used. So, the pedigree of his materials is great.
    I think this is right.
    I've noticed something else recently while reviewing Pat Martino's "Linear Expressions" material. Martino and Conti don't play the same lines but there is a sense in which they're doing the same thing: they have lines they favor for how they lay out on the guitar (-one could take a step back and say they have shapes they favor for the way they lay out on the guitar). Then, and this is the heart of the good stuff, they leared how to move those lines around so that they're not always in the same relationship to the chord of the moment. In other words, they can put the same line into several different places. A great advantage of this is that it allows them to play the same lines or activities over and over, thus getting them down for ease of execution at even the brightest tempos. This is crucial for guitar because as we all know, there are lots of ways to play the same succession of pitches on the guitar.

    Now, some teachers want students to be equally adept at all possible ways to play something. (Or at least they seem to.)
    Others do not. Conti (and Martino) seem to me to be in the "do not" camp. They can play whatever they want, they are both masters, but I think a key to their mastery lies in learning what they can effortlessly execute and then getting the most possible mileage out of those lines (or "activities", as Martino calls them).

    (My thoughts on this are still taking shape.)
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  14. #13

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    [QUOTE=mjirish;943283 The second point (that is often overlooked) with Conti's materials are that they provide lines that are "seeds" for further development. When I have students learn a Conti line or solo, they play it "just as is" for quite a while and learn to insert these phrases, verbatim, into standard repertoire. Sort of like cut and paste. But, what happens next is the key here: the students unconsciously start to modify these lines, and their own "take" on the lines become "their" vocabulary. This is very exciting to witness because it is the "birth" of an individual voice and style. I have literally seen this with hundreds of students that have faithfully followed this path.[/QUOTE]

    And the above point in my opinion is perhaps the most important one of all.

    This is ideally how it works - this is how players start to become their own unique guitarist!

    Regards,
    Steven Herron
    The Ticket To Improv Jazz Guitar Course

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by rlrhett View Post
    I'm really digging Conti's series. There are a bunch of good study groups going on here, so I am not alone. What I think really makes them great is that RC basicly does a guided "transcription". He leads you through his solo bar for bar demonstrating it, talking about what he was thinking, showing the triads and scalar runs, etc.

    Yes, yes. There is someone reading this right now vein bulging on forehead, eyes twitching, fingers practically vibrating over the keyboard to tell me that "real" jazz players don't need no friggin "guided" transcription. They learned solos walking chest deep in snow uphill --both ways!!!-- while playing an old stump strung with razor wire they stole from the neighbors feedlot. Duly noted, and I am truly humbled.

    Now, back to the point....

    I've learned a lot from doing Conti's solos. But I don't love them as music. Sorry Bob. I know your assistant monitors this forum. You are a monster player, and even better teacher. But the solo's are just not what I would want to play.

    So, is there another enterprising player who does a similar video lesson on a solo, breaking it down bar for bar? Jens Larson, maybe? I'm ready to start on something new, but I just don't want another Conti solo. I know the Rayney/Abersold books do solos, but they lack that guided aspect that makes Conti so special.

    Any suggestions for other DVD's or online courses that do something similar?

    Thanks!
    As someone working through the Conti material I have been following this thread with interest, I have like you done the TTI lessons, I was in the study group and I have really enjoyed the process.
    I am now just starting on "The Jazz Lines" where Mr Conti goes in to the nuts and bolts of the lines.


    I wonder if your desire to jump ship now is perhaps not the best thing to do, it sounds like you have done a lot of hard work already. Remember the TTI solos are not the finished article, they are there to get you started and moving your fingers in the right way.

    I was thinking that one thing you could do is have a Skype lesson with Mr Conti. Its not cheap but I am sure it would be great. After receiving a call from him last year while doing the TTI study group, it really inspired me to keep going. I intend to organise a Skype lesson myself later this year, when I am deeper into the Jazz Lines, perhaps a birthday present to myself.

    The other thing is a study group for the Jazz lines would be great, I know from experience that it helps to work through this stuff with others. If you or anyone else, want to do that I am just starting so now is the time.

    andyb

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by andyb View Post
    The other thing is a study group for the Jazz lines would be great, I know from experience that it helps to work through this stuff with others. If you or anyone else, want to do that I am just starting so now is the time.

    andyb
    I have "The Jazz Lines" and have worked at them from time to time. I'd be interested in a study group.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  17. #16

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    Great, PM sent.