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  1. #1

    Hip Pocket - Brent Mason. Notation help

    Thought I would do some transcribing this morning. I’ve hit this hurdle on it’s A section before and canned it, so I’m giving it another attempt. It’s easy to play, just confusing to notate!

    This one is off of the Smokin Section album.

    It’s a simple enough 4 bar repeating blues line in Am.

    I’m having trouble notating it because of the way it alternates (to my understanding) between 7/8 and 4/4 for 4 bars. I’m not sure if this is the correct way to think on it, but it seems to look a lot cleaner on a page, rather than 4/4 with lots of syncopation until it syncs up after 4 bars.

    If you know this tune, I hope you can shed some light on it for me.

    Many thanks






    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Does the rhythm section also sit in the 7/8 4/4 alternation scheme.
    One important goal of notating is for it to be easily readable.
    You can also organize beams that support the grouping, including ones that cross bar lines if you stayed in 4/4.

  3. #3

    Hip Pocket - Brent Mason. Notation help

    Quote Originally Posted by bako View Post
    Does the rhythm section also sit in the 7/8 4/4 alternation scheme.
    One important goal of notating is for it to be easily readable.
    You can also organize beams that support the grouping, including ones that cross bar lines if you stayed in 4/4.

    I would not be surprised if I was over complicating things for myself!

    Yes, it adds up, the rhythm section sits....as I listen more critically....an 1/8th beat chopped off the first bar, or starting the 2nd bar on the ‘and’ of 4.

    A-7

    1 + 2 + 3 + 4 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + ... etc

    It’s only the head of the tune that does this, the rest is 4/4


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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  5. #5

    Hip Pocket - Brent Mason. Notation help

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    I was unfamiliar with this track.
    I take it this is the version you're working on?

    That’s the one.

    Here’s where I’m at, for you to play along. I’ll update it as I go...



    A section

    A-7 Dorian.............A#-7................



    Bridge


    Fmaj9 / E7b9 / A-7 / D9 /

    Fmaj9 / E7b9 / A-7 / Abdim / G11 Gbm7b5 / Fmaj7 E7#9 / G11 Gbm7b5/

    Fmaj7 E7#9 / E7#9 /


    My harmonic analysis....please correct me if I’m wrong


    From C / Am...

    IV / III7 / vi / II7.

    The descending chords from Abdim...

    V7b9 / V bVm7b5 / IV III7 /




    Love the feel with this section, grooovy!


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by likeshisjazz134679; 06-03-2018 at 06:33 AM.

  6. #6
    I would write the 4 bar phrases of the A section in this scheme:

    4/4 | 3/4 | 4/4 | 4/4

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by bako View Post
    You can also organize beams that support the grouping, including ones that cross bar lines if you stayed in 4/4.

    This might be the answer for me in this situation. If you’re saying I can break the rules! (I don’t know them well enough to break them myself!Hip Pocket - Brent Mason.  Notation help) I’ll try it out and see how it looks.

    Many thanks Bako.



    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    No rule breaking, that's the way it sounds to me.
    Rhythm section and melody are in sync with the meter change.
    Counting a fast quarter note and writing the line in 8th notes is the way I'm conceiving it.
    If not for the meter shift, I would likely write this with 16th notes and a slower quarter note.

  9. #9
    Brent Mason. Today's Hank Garland.

  10. #10
    I've seen this before.

    There's a lick. You sort of expect the last note to be held so that the lick starts again on the one.

    But, instead, the lick repeats starting earlier, in this case a beat early.

    If you notate as a bar of 7, or cross a bar line, it's confusing. Easy to hear, but it may be hard to read.

    So, I think I'd find it easiest to read (as someone else already said) if the lick is 7 beats long, a bar of 4 and a bar of 3. Then it starts again at the beginning of the third bar.

    If you're tapping your foot in half notes, there's a double tap.

    Some things like this end up being notated partly in 7/8 but that seems to confuse people. The first time I saw this I had to remind myself that 3.5/4 is the same as 7/8. So it was really three and a half beats in the original time signature. Better readers realize instantly that the quarter note pulse is now written as an eighth note pulse. So, one way to count it would be to suddenly start tapping your foot twice as fast. I think it's easier to tap at the original speed and double tap at the end of the bar, or don't tap.

    Theoretically, it might make sense to write it in 7/4 or 7/8, but what a lot of players will do is draw a vertical line on the chart in the middle of the bar. You even sometimes see them printed that way by the publisher.

  11. #11
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    7/8 to 4/4 is the way I hear it.

    Hip Pocket - Brent Mason.  Notation help-mason-jpg
    Last edited by Dana; 06-08-2018 at 01:48 PM.
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