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  1. #1

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    Some ridiculously cool stuff here.

    Limehouse Blues - Cannonball and Coltrane Shred-limehouse-blues-cannonball-trane-solos-full-score-page-001-jpgLimehouse Blues - Cannonball and Coltrane Shred-limehouse-blues-cannonball-trane-solos-full-score-page-002-jpgLimehouse Blues - Cannonball and Coltrane Shred-limehouse-blues-cannonball-trane-solos-full-score-page-003-jpg

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Thanks much!
    Paolo

  4. #3

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    Paging Dick Onstenk (Dutch Bopper). He'll work on this stuff and post a vid of him playing it w/the recording. Great guy...

  5. #4

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    That'll do for reading practice tomorrow

  6. #5

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    I love the tempo marking "stupid tempo". LOL


    Cool thanks, already grabbed a cool II-V to mess with tonight.

    Update:

    I just picked up the album it's only $5 on Amazon download: Cannonball Adderley Quintet in Chicago.
    Last edited by docbop; 09-05-2017 at 07:10 PM.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  7. #6

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    Not sure if the rhythms in bar 41 are accurate - it sounds to me like Cannonball basically stays on the upbeats - am I hearing that right?

  8. #7

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    Coltrane's line are bizarre lol. Sound great though. I can't see much connection to the underlying chords! Some tetrachord stuff... Anyone?

    Cannonball's lines do reference the lydian dominant sound a lot, which is interesting given my historical musings re: the melodic minor modes.... So Cannonball was using that sound heavily by 1958. Not so much on the D7 perhaps.
    Last edited by christianm77; 09-06-2017 at 11:24 AM.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Coltrane's line are bizarre lol. Sound great though. I can't see much connection to the underlying chords! Some tetrachord stuff... Anyone?

    Cannonball's lines do reference the lydian dominant sound a lot, which is interesting given my historical musings re: the melodic minor modes.... So Cannonball was using that sound heavily by 1958. Not so much on the D7 perhaps.
    He is 'kind of' playing the Giants Steps cycle downwards (if I remember correctly) on top of F7. It is strange. Cm-Db7-Gb-A7-D-F7. Go figure.

    I think Cannoball is thinking Lydian dominant also. Those lines are pure minor.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Not sure if the rhythms in bar 41 are accurate - it sounds to me like Cannonball basically stays on the upbeats - am I hearing that right?
    I think he comes back on the beat. Maybe not. This solo was quite tricky to transcribe.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by kekkuli View Post
    He is 'kind of' playing the Giants Steps cycle downwards (if I remember correctly) on top of F7. It is strange. Cm-Db7-Gb-A7-D-F7. Go figure.

    I think Cannoball is thinking Lydian dominant also. Those lines are pure minor.
    Yeah I think I heard a bit of the GS cycle in there, but it's not obviously used.

  12. #11

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    Had another look at this today. I think Cannonball is think C minor over F7#11, not necessarily F lydian dom, or even C melodic minor on F7.

    You might say 'who cares' or 'what's the difference?' but I'm purely interested here in how the melodic minor mode concept developed.

    The use of ascending C melodic minor (more or less) in bars 19-20 is pretty much how you would use the scale melodically if you coming from a classical scales background. He doesn't lean heavily in the note B, you'll notice.

    Also, he plays a C blues phrase later on F7, which kind of says to me he's playing his usual C minor bag on F7.

    This both a venerable technique (it's what Django and Grappelli seem to do a couple of times on their version of this tune)



    and also organically moves into the melodic minor modal world. I honestly think players of this period freely use minor scales on the fifth of a dominant without focussing on the melodic minor tonality but sometimes it comes out. In general they tend to highlight the 3rd (in Cannonball's case to A on F7#11) rather than the B (#11.) There are some interesting exceptions though.