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  1. #1

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    A moment worth pondering.


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  3. #2

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    I have always liked and respected Springsteen. Not fanboy level though. For as great as he is about being introspective I find it a little ironic that he isn't as good about editing out his work that seems far inferior to his better stuff. Everyone has a ratio of good-to-bad. Just my opinion and not worth much at that.

  4. #3

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    I've never been a fan of Springsteen's, though enough of my friends (plus my older brother) have been that I have heard many of his records many times.

    But I find this "desperate man" idea interesting. Also the idea that the best songs have some spark, some bit, some something that makes "1 and 1 make 3." Randy Newman is great at that. Dylan too. Robbie Roberston comes to mind. Joni Mitchell. Johnny Mercer too.

  5. #4

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    I can’t agree with you more. Sometimes what he refers to as a spark seems more like a misfire to me though.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    I can’t agree with you more. Sometimes what he refers to as a spark seems more like a misfire to me though.
    Ha! Well, I'm not his biggest fan but he definitely has a wealth of material to his credit, even if most of it isn't to my taste. And he has his own way with a song----he's not a carbon copy of some other songwriter. He's giving his best, which is all one can ask.

    My favorite song of his is the one he wrote for Dave Edmunds:


  7. #6

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    I thought Nebraska was a great album. My favourite Springsteen by a mile. His auto-biography was a good read, too, irrespective of whether you're fan of his music. Really shows the commitment that he (and I guess anyone who make is) had to succeed. Assuming he wrote it, he has a fine way with words as well as music.

  8. #7

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    I have it but I haven't read it yet. It is about time I do I suppose. I did see the video special on the Broadway show. I enjoyed it. The thing that I appreciated the most was him saying how he was actually pretty far removed from the characters in his work. He wasn't really "a saint in the city." He was just a disillusioned kid in NJ with an imagination.

  9. #8

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    Early stuff is pretty damn great...

    Since say, "The River?" Zzzzzz.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Early stuff is pretty damn great...

    Since say, "The River?" Zzzzzz.
    Yeah, my favorite Springsteen song is still "Blinded By The Light" which is the first song on his first record. Things seemed to lose their luster for me after The River, but I like Nebraska, and bits of Human Touch and Lucky Town. Could even stand Tunnel of Love. Beyond that I have some cringe worthy moments when I hear a Springsteen song.

  11. #10

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    I'm not a fan of his, but I think he's right about this. I'd go further and say that that third element is passion -- you've got to not only deliver the song with passion; when you write it, you must put passion into its bones.

    I guess his passions and mine are just a little different, is all. He's obviously really good at connecting with his audience, so they're hearing something I'm not, I guess.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thumpalumpacus
    I'm not a fan of his, but I think he's right about this. I'd go further and say that that third element is passion -- you've got to not only deliver the song with passion, when you write it, you must put passion into its bones.

    I guess his passions and mine are just a little different, is all. He's obviously really good at connecting with his audience, so they're hearing something I'm not, I guess.
    Even though I'm not wild about many of his songs, I do think he brings his passion to them. When he says you have to be irritated by something All The Time, weill, I think a lot of good songs come when something that gets under our skin finds its voice. It could be a big thing---war---or a small one (stuck in traffic, waiting in line, too many rainy days in a row, a neighbor's barking dog) but as John Lee Hooker's dad said about the boogie, "It's in him and it's got to come out."