Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Posts 1 to 25 of 71
  1. #1

    User Info Menu


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    hah...emotions are completely subjective...but have to hand it to the guy for his presentation..well done

    i was expecting pachelbels canon

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 07-23-2020 at 05:15 PM. Reason: sp-

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    nope

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Beethoven was pretty good with chords.

    Saddest, this is what came to mind.


  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Saddest, my ass :-)

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    People confuse sadness with sentimentality or depressing melancholy. It's neither. Sadness is usually characterised by simplicity and is never sentimental.

    This is fairly sad. The pianist is blind and it's an elegy for the victims of the tsunami of 2011 in Japan. He composed it himself. It's entirely derivative, of course, but the thing is that it's genuine, and that's what one feels. Dammit, even the major section is sad!


  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    hah...emotions are completely subjective...but have to hand it to the guy for his presenation..well done

    i was expecting pachelbels canon

    cheers
    Of course things like 'saddest... blablabla... ever' are exeggerations...

    Every experience is subjective (especially perceptio of arts).. not only emotional.

    but there are lots of conventional things in culture which form quite distinctive musical languages...
    Classical musci has lots of idioms that have very clear meaning and emotions... the simples is the 'sigh motive' for example (suspension - resolution) and there are lots of thing slike that of different levels that allow to express very complex things through music.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    By the way, you should check Nobuyuki Tsujii out. He's no popular player but a renowned concert pianist. Worth knowing about.

    Nobuyuki Tsujii - Wikipedia

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    but there are lots of conventional things in culture which form quite distinctive musical languages... Classical music has lots of idioms that have very clear meaning and emotions... the simples is the 'sigh motive' for example (suspension - resolution) and there are lots of thing slike that of different levels that allow to express very complex things through music.
    I agree.
    It is easy to say it's all subjective yet I think if someone said, for example, "Build Me Up Buttercup" was the saddest song of all we would think they didn't understand the meaning of sad.

    We could, of course, understand someone crying when they heard that song---say, in a drugstore--and when we asked why they were crying they said something like, "That was 'our' song. She died so young...." We would understand that emotion. But if someone said, "Those chords, that beat, that is the sound of grief!" I think we would be at a loss. And if they persisted and said, "That is what sadness means to me", well, we probably would shake our heads and mutter, "Alrighty then."



  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    the thing described in an article to me is basically plagal turnaround with minor IV preceded by major IV (or IVhalf dim or D7/9 (usually with F# in the base)

    It is common for late romantic music as it had a bit of a folky colour which was in trend...

    There is The Beartles 'If I Fell' - But John Lennon especially liked the turnaround: Nowhere Man, In My Life are things that come to my mind immidiately...


    As for semantics (it is semantics!) to me unprepared change from major to minor (which we basically have here) is always connected with some 'misericordia' effect.. like an expression of a very human compassion... or self-ditraction, humility...

    I remember my childhood impression of Moolight Sonata... I imagined some kind of figure solwly moving that at first seems to raise his spirits with challenge (modulation to E major at 0:40) but then keeps going but suddenly drops the head down. (E minor at 0:45)


  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    People confuse sadness with sentimentality or depressing melancholy. It's neither. Sadness is usually characterised by simplicity and is never sentimental.

    This is fairly sad. The pianist is blind and it's an elegy for the victims of the tsunami of 2011 in Japan. He composed it himself. It's entirely derivative, of course, but the thing is that it's genuine, and that's what one feels. Dammit, even the major section is sad!

    By the way this is exactly what Marc described in his post about a person who suddenly cries on an unexpected song...

    here the guy plays totally corny pop tune - as sentimental and primitive in means as one can be that would fit some Hollywood melodrama... and the effect comes from teh reference to the victims of tsunami (which seems either manipulative trick here or stupidity to me - sorry for being rough...)

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    I'm moved by songs like
    - Goin' home, sung by Paul Robeson
    - Don't forget, by Pat Metheny
    - I loves you Porgy, Keith Jarrett
    - and many, many sung by Billie Holiday, played by Bill Evans, ......

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Sad songs say so much....


  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    By the way this is exactly what Marc described in his post about a person who suddenly cries on an unexpected song...

    here the guy plays totally corny pop tune - as sentimental and primitive in means as one can be that would fit some Hollywood melodrama... and the effect comes from teh reference to the victims of tsunami (which seems either manipulative trick here or stupidity to me - sorry for being rough...)
    You're not rough, you're uninformed.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    You're not rough, you're uninformed.
    Oh... then try to inform me.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Saddest? FWIW, my money is on:


  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    By the way this is exactly what Marc described in his post about a person who suddenly cries on an unexpected song...

    here the guy plays totally corny pop tune - as sentimental and primitive in means as one can be that would fit some Hollywood melodrama... and the effect comes from teh reference to the victims of tsunami (which seems either manipulative trick here or stupidity to me - sorry for being rough...)
    As a long-time American admirer of pianist Nobuyuki Tsujii (Nobu) I feel compelled to put in a word here.

    This performance is an elegy to the victims of Japan's earthquake/tsunami in March 2011, an original composition by the pianist when he made his debut recital in Carnegie Hall in November of that year. Tsujii is not a sentimental person and is very popular in classical piano, especially in his native Japan. Born blind, he is unpretentious and widely admired for his musical finesse and sincerity.

    Nobuyuki Tsujii International Fans

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    A.................................A+
    It's my party and I'll cry if I want to

    D .........................Dm
    cry if I want to cry if I want to

    Now that's sad. Note how the changes all hit on the word "cry"--how deep is that?

    Danny W.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    A.................................A+
    It's my party and I'll cry if I want to

    D .........................Dm
    cry if I want to cry if I want to

    Now that's sad. Note how the changes all hit on the word "cry"--how deep is that?

    Danny W.
    I love that song!

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    https://blog.landr.com/emotional-chord-progressions/


    I must admit, as a songwriter I am fascinated by chord progressions. Or sometimes just a particular change. What I know best can sometimes feel "old hat", so I sometimes try something different just to see what it's like.
    Articles like this are worth it to me if they give me one idea that may turn out to be one bit of one song. ;o)

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    There is wealth of beautiful and really unique (in lack of a better word) harmonies in the music of Edu Lobo (Pra dizer adeus....) , Jobim, Guinga, Ivan Lins -
    Saudade is the word.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Saudade is often translated as nostalgia.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    Oh... then try to inform me.
    I could inform you, in gruesome detail, but it's not for me to do your homework.

    The word sad is related to sorrow and grief. Sentimentality, on the other hand, is about nostalgia, romanticism, idealism, and so on. They are completely different. If you said to parents who were upset because they had lost a child that they were merely being 'sentimental' god knows what would happen.

    Then consider this piano player. Obviously you don't know who he is. He's a world renowned classical concert pianist who can play the deepest and most difficult pieces flawlessly by ear. If you think such a mind would then descend into mawkish sentimentality at the loss of so many of his people in the tsunami, including those he knew, then I have nothing to say. It's not a 'pop song' and it's only a gross uncomprehending ignorance that would suggest it.

    Enough? No doubt you'll have some clever answer but it doesn't really bother me. For those who have ears to hear, let them hear.


  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    You want sad, yet beautiful?

    Greg Brown -- Who Killed Cock Robin


  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by WorldNobuyukiTsujiiFans
    As a long-time American admirer of pianist Nobuyuki Tsujii (Nobu) I feel compelled to put in a word here.

    This performance is an elegy to the victims of Japan's earthquake/tsunami in March 2011, an original composition by the pianist when he made his debut recital in Carnegie Hall in November of that year. Tsujii is not a sentimental person and is very popular in classical piano, especially in his native Japan. Born blind, he is unpretentious and widely admired for his musical finesse and sincerity.

    Nobuyuki Tsujii International Fans
    It is all great information and probably he is a great unpretentious personality but that does not make that music any better.