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  1. #51

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    Except Willie thinks he playing Fmaj, Emaj7, Ebmaj, not Fmaj, Abmin, Ebmaj. The bass is moving down in half steps because Willie Learned from jazz masters.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    People confuse sadness with sentimentality or depressing melancholy. It's neither. Sadness is usually characterised by simplicity and is never sentimental.
    Ragman, can you explain a bit more? I'm not quite following your connection.

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Beethoven was pretty good with chords.

    Saddest, this is what came to mind.

    Beethoven wrote the sonata for a younger student who he was attracted to. But being from different social classes there was no hope of a relationship. Also near this time Beethoven’s hearing loss had become more serious. Yes, I’m certain these facts combined to echo a melancholy spirit within the sonata. It is but the first of three movements of a sonata that is the most well known.

    Btw, it’s Piano Sonata No. 14 in C sharp minor. It’s suggested that 5 years after his death that a critic dubbed the tune Moonlight Sonata, and it stuck.

    Me, I think it’s 69 measures of pure joy which has lived on for a couple centuries. But it didn’t define Beethoven. I believe Symphony 7, or 5, or 9 did.

  5. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep
    Beethoven was pretty good with chords.

    Saddest, this is what came to mind.

    this is sadder, give it about a minute to kick in


  6. #55

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    Sadness is certainly not just a one-dimensional aural emotion. A harmonious progression or a melody that is perceived as particularly sad is therefore not decisive. Nonetheless, there are clichés - not only in film music - that can invoke a sad mood among many listeners.
    YMMV, but for my "own" sadness, musically seen, a reflective, contemplative and repetitive manner is necessary. II-V-I in minor can be ok, like in Grant Green's 'Idle Moments'. Grant's guitar voice, IMO, isn't so much emotionally moving - sometimes a guitar is not sufficient enough - as is Joe Henderson's subtle subtone tenor sax playing (7:42f - note that the rhythm section immediately slows down in tempo when Joe starts):



    Another nice example is Manuel de Falla's 'Nana', a lullaby. Similar to Gershwins' 'Summertime', there's not just a feeling of sadness, but also of solice and expected joy. Likewise, good humor is always linked to tragedy. Sadness is not only an emotion reactively triggered by past or present conditions, but also by the thought of the future with all its imponderables and upcoming happy and sad events, ultimately our own mortality.
    My favorite 'Nana' version is not on YT, so just this:


  7. #56

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    Sorry for coming with something obvious, but this is really sad:

    (... and I also would like to seize the opportunity, to say Michelangeli is the greatest. I can not say he is little known, but surely ten times less known than others. )


  8. #57

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    Does this match your definition of sadness :

  9. #58

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    I thought this was supposed to be about chord progressions, not sad tunes!

  10. #59

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    "D minor is the saddest key."


  11. #60

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  12. #61

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  13. #62

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  14. #63

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  15. #64

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    Not sure there is a "saddest" chord progression, but if we're allowed to post songs that we personally feel to be the saddest we've experienced, well then, there's a few such songs on Lou's "Berlin" album! ... Take this cheerful little ditty for example:


  16. #65

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    In a sense that a harmonic progression/bass line has a historical connection with grief, we can talk about the lamento bass

    Alex Ross: The Rest Is Noise: chacona

  17. #66

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    A nice TED talk by Zander:

    ”the job of the C is to make the B sad”

  18. #67

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  19. #68

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    Certain tunes are like a call and response to our emotional reservoir. The tune calls and we respond with memories and feelings attached to them.
    That is what certain songs do to me..
    This one “Tears” by Django Reinhardt and Stephan Grappelli brings out a certain sadness..

  20. #69

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    There is this


  21. #70

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    Quote Originally Posted by rintincop
    this is more like sentimenthal and pathetic than sad. I also sense some ambigous self-pity in the music, which is the most inapprpriate expression in art for me. Sadness should express also pain over a loss and this is missing here.

    Regarding Karajan, he was the ultimate star of DG, shadowing many way more talented artists over decades. He was a terrible narcissist, always standing on others head and back, and priorizing his personal ego over human values, with way less contribution than was attributed to him by DG, and snoobs. Nowadays fortunatelly his "legacy" are in more appropriate lower valued, hopefully the time when he will be forgetted will come. If one is into Mahler, I recommend Abbado's recordings, but there are least a dozen what could be picked over Karajan, which is especially unapproiate in case of Mahler.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor

    Regarding? Karajan, he was the ultimate star of DG, shadowing many way more talented artists over decades. He was a terrible narcissist, always standing on others head and back, and priorizing his personal ego over human values, with way less contribution than was attributed to him by DG, and snoobs. Nowadays fortunatelly his "legacy" are in more appropriate lower valued, hopefully the time when he will be forgetted will come. If one is into Mahler, I recommend Abbado's recordings, but there are least a dozen what could be picked over Karajan, which is especially unapproiate in case of Mahler.
    not to mention he was a Nazi, either by conviction or careerism

    there is this version