1. #1

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    I seem to recall someone being interested in Counterpoint in the Baroque style etc., but being frustrated by the materials found on the market toay because they're more focused on contemporary periods/practices.

    Then I thought, well it's still taught in music colleges and they have textbooks, so I checked Amazon in the textbook category - not regular books. There's a fair amount of material out there. One only needs to search on music counterpoint, two-part inventions, fugue, etc.

    Cheers.

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    https://www.amazon.com/Counterpoint-...s=books&sr=1-3

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    There is nothing like music itslef in concern of baroque style.

    There is a lot of music composed for melodic instument and basso continuo in two voices.
    It is often playable on guitar - especially whent it is for flute or oboe (violine can be more challenging due to specific violine techniques and textures).

    I think it teaches the best of all...

    There is a trend in historically informed performance to use 'partimenti' as supposedly historical methodical tool.
    But to be honest I do not support it and find it to be rather a modern interpretation of historical information.
    I think partimenti existed more like a material for amateurs, or reflected a spirit of epoch with its tendency for teh puzzles, labyriths, games... they can be of a help for modern musician for sure. But they mean nothing without overall inderstanding of music whic was in the blood of the musicians and amateurs of the period (and which often is absent in modern people).

    I am more than sure that professional students of the period started mostly at a very early age and there were basically two major dsiciplines:
    - practical music, playing the instruments, and mostly masters works, and basso continuo, including solfege
    - theoretic polyphonic counterpoint of the 'old school' (meaning 'pre-baroque' renaissance counterpoint which was considered more strict and fundamental, playing a role of 'Latin of music'.

  4. #3

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    I never really studied counterpoint like I should have---regrettable since I take composing quite seriously, and always describe myself as player-composer.

    Outside of the obvious, like using contrary motion when called for, and having analyzed a scant few Bach chorales and preludes with composition teachers and on my own, I am remiss.

    Can someone recommend a good beginning method book?